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4
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2answers
115 views

How are empirical concepts acquired according to Kant?

In Critique of Pure Reason Kant describes in detail what aspects of our knowledge are a priori, and how they function, but on the empirical aspects he is sketchy and cryptic. Very briefly, our ...
4
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2answers
119 views

How empiricism and positivism is distinguished? What's their differences?

According to Wikipedia, Empiricism is a theory that states that knowledge comes only or primarily from sensory experience. One of several views of epistemology, the study of human knowledge, along ...
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5answers
179 views

Empiricism in Eastern Philosophy?

Some definitions: Empiricism: Sensory/Empirical data is the only or best source of knowledge. Eastern philosophy: Philosophical traditions that grew independently of the Greco-Roman philosophical ...
3
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1answer
94 views

What is the difference between Aristotle and Locke's empiricism?

Both Aristotle and Locke are commonly viewed as empiricists. Indeed, both state roughly that "there is nothing in the intellect that is not first in the senses" and that "the mind is a blank slate". ...
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1answer
19 views

What is it mean by “to be meet with in space” by Moore?

I was reading the Moore's proof of external world, and I am completely stuck with an idea/phrase of "to be meet with in space." It is on page 130 on the following pdf philosophical papers, collier ...
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1answer
48 views

Evidence for beliefs

If someone believes a certain set of ideas and/or principles is true, is it true this person will had to have had some 'real' (empirical, 'non-a-priori-established') evidence of some information in ...
5
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1answer
60 views

How does the modern notion of 'empiricism' stack up against the Platonist and Neoplatonist concept of mind and understanding above sense and opinion?

That is to say, the interpretation of visual-auditory-tactile-kinesthetic (VATK) perception (the empiric)--usually translated, in modern gestalt theory, as form or shape--should take a more holistic ...
2
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2answers
52 views

In regards to Hume, do geometry, algebra and arithmetic form ideas that do not come from sense perceptions?

"The less forcible and lively are commonly denominated Thoughts or Ideas. The other species want a name in our language, and in most others; I suppose, because it was not requisite for any, but ...
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4answers
623 views

Kant's refutation of empiricism

I have been told from numerous sources that Kant's arguments against empiricism basically "refuted" it, specifically the ones found in his "Critique of Pure Reason". Unfortunately, for me, reading ...
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2answers
120 views

Help me understand Logical Positivists points

I am studying Logical Positivism on my own, and though I get the most of it, I am confused about some points, and I will be really grateful if you can help me here. I am studying it from here. In the ...
0
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5answers
334 views

What empirical evidence would exclude the Intelligent Designer hypothesis?

While there aren't indisputable (to say the least) arguments supporting the Intelligent Designer thesis, I had never seen (or imagined myself) an argument that could definitively debunk this ...
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2answers
487 views

Ought we only form beliefs based on sufficient empirical evidence?

In The Outsider Test for Faith, John Loftus often makes statements like: Faith, as I argue, is an irrational leap over the probabilities. Probabilities about such a matter are all that matter. We ...
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1answer
1k views

Is Hume's Fork self-refuting?

David Hume wrote: If we take in our hand any volume; of divinity or school metaphysics, for instance; let us ask, Does it contain any abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number? No. Does it ...
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4answers
3k views

What are the most basic assumptions one has to make in order to conduct science?

I often wondered: What are the most basic assumptions I have to make before I can even start thinking about life, universe and the rest? So far I have boiled them down to three: There is a world, a ...
8
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1answer
1k views

What did Wittgenstein mean by saying that the belief in the causal nexus is a superstition?

In the Tractatus-Logicus Wittenstein says: 5.1361 The events of the future cannot be inferred from those of the present. Superstition is the belief in the causal nexus. I'm not quite ...
3
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1answer
193 views

What did Hume and Russell have to say about atheists and morality?

I have heard Christian apologists argue that, since atheists view humans the same as other animals, they can therefore have no more of a moral compass than do animals. E.g., Greg Bahnsen argues this ...
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2answers
147 views

What is the all (sabba) in the buddhist suttas and philosophical context?

What does the Buddha mean by 'the all' (sabba) as found in the suttas? How is this perspective categorized philosophically and how does this perspective compare with other modern philosophies? I have ...
10
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1answer
675 views

How is Bonjour's coherence theory of justification not just a version of foundationalism?

In presenting his coherence theory of justification BonJour appeals to what he calls the “Observation Requirement.” Bonjour’s observation requirement is the notion that there are some kinds of ...
3
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1answer
152 views

What is a mathematical or logical name for the process of proving a statement by exhausting the domain?

I am trying to understand logic and I came across a set of actions that I describe below that I can't get my head around. Suppose you have a bag of multiple colored balls. Situation 1. Argument: ...
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2answers
2k views

Was Aristotle an Empiricist?

When I was taught about Aristotle and Plato, the picture I got was very much like this image from a Raphael fresco: Usually Plato is said to be pointing to the heavens, which represent abstract ...
5
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1answer
219 views

Are there any responses to Penelope Maddy's “Second Philosophy”?

I am finishing up reading Penelopy Maddy's [2007] "Second Philosophy". I really enjoy her flavor of naturalism. Like Quine, she justifies parts of mathematics because of its application. Unlike Quine, ...
3
votes
1answer
380 views

Contradiction between belief in cause and effect & belief in the continued existence of matter

In A Treatise of Human Nature, section 1.4.7 (the conclusion of part 1), Hume states that there are some circumstances in which belief in the continued existence of matter and the belief in cause and ...
3
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0answers
610 views

how are rationalism and empiricism related to modern epistemology? Should epistemology be seen as incorporating both? [closed]

Epistemology by simplest definition is the theory of knowledge and one of the things it addresses is the source of knowledge. On the other hand we know that rationalism (deduction) and empiricism ...
9
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10answers
3k views

Does philosophy belong to empirical science or formal science?

According to Wikipedia, science can be divided into empirical science (such as natural science and social science) and formal science (such as mathematics, logic, statistics). I was wondering if ...
7
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3answers
373 views

Who said they were hiding in the woods?

In my undergraduate days, I remember reading someone occupying roughly a mental and historical space as David Hume (originally my thought was between Hume and Kuhn), and have a vaguely recalled ...
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7answers
26k views

What did David Hume mean when he said that “reason is a slave to the passions”?

I don't understand the meaning of this oft-quoted quotation of Hume's in On Reason, namely his saying that "reason is a slave to the passions." What exactly does he mean by that ? Is it simply that ...