concerns logical fallacies, which are errors in the logic or reasoning of an argument that result in a misconception or presumption

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name this fallacy: A was P in the past -> A must be P now

I've been seeing arguments of this form for awhile: (agreed true premise) Some predicate P was applicable to behavior/event/thing A in the past. Variations: P(A) may have been true at some ...
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“I have X in my blood” arguments

Lately, I have been hearing the argument "Oh, well I have Indian(Native American) in my blood, and 'redskin' does not offend me so why change the name?" coming from people who claim their ...
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Identify the fallacy: moral source states X is necessary. X is about Y. Ergo, it is really Y that is necessary

This is a quote from a church website. Is there a particular logical fallacy being employed in the last paragraph (last two sentences)? The first paragraph is provided for context: Next, as a ...
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What is the logical fallacy that transforms an argument to an extreme case, then rejects it?

I'm looking for the name of a logical fallacy in which person #1 makes a statement, and person #2 misinterprets it as a far more extreme statement, then rejects the extreme version. Example (simple ...
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Any video course on Logic & Logical fallacies?

After discovering this site and spending some time going through questions, I'm amazed by the answers and comments on Is 'guns don't kill people people kill people' a good argument?. Even though I'm ...
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Fallacious appeals to unreliability or madness

Is there a fallacy which claims Mr Smith claims X Mr Smith is clearly irrational about some things X isn't true. I suppose a kind of appeal to not being an authority - but I mean specifically an ...
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Is there a term for the absence of evidence fallacy with regard to scientific falsification?

If one looks at the roots of science, it is not founded on being right, but on being easy to prove wrong. Popper's concept of falsification puts this in words. I see many who see the absence of ...
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Is there a name for the fallacy of not doing something because something bad happens anyway?

The idea goes something like this: We can't do something good to try to stop something bad because something else bad, that is independent of the first, still might happen. (Key word still). Is there ...
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1. “X is a subset or part of y. x is true. so, y is true.” 2. “x came from y. y is true. so x is true”. Which fallacy are they?

example of the second argument. 'ad-duniya' (an arabic word) means 'nearer'. the word is denoted 115 times in Quran. In some cases the word 'ad-duniya' has been used for the meaning 'this world'. So ...
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Can the “accident” fallacy be applied to religious laws?

I need help understanding a discussion of the accident fallacy from the following site: http://www.logicallyfallacious.com/index.php/logical-fallacies/2-accident-fallacy It describes the following as ...
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When a fallacy actually occurs

Assume a debate has occurred and a result ended the debate, but in this result a slippery slope is coming true - more specifically the contrapositive used as a basis for argument that relied on a ...
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Diminishing problems by presenting “bigger” problems- a fallacy?

Wasn't really sure how to phrase this, but I'm thinking of an instance in which someone diminishes a problem by presenting one of larger scope- as a rather shoddy example, "x political problem in ...
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What logical fallacies exist in David Lewis and Stephanie Lewis' article called “holes”?

In David & Stephanie Lewis' Article "Holes" the nominalist/realist debate gets taken to a phenomena that all of us are likely directly aware of at one point in our lives. Holes. The absent ...
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Does “the experience of transition requires negotiation between sacrifice and opportunity” make sense logically? [closed]

I've thought about this statement enough to know it doesn't make logical sense, but I've not thought hard enough to determine why it doesn't make logical sense. The word 'and' conceptually links two ...
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How to avoid the slippery slope fallacy in arguments and discussions? [closed]

I´m looking for advice on how to argue better. Sometimes, in a discussion, I have the bad habit of generating strong examples, that are near to violating Godwin's law or invoking the slippery slope. ...
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Is there a name for the fallacy whereby complex phenomena are believed to require an equally complex explanation?

The term "the ontological-epistemological identity fallacy" has been suggested to me in private correspondence as a name for this fallacy. However, that term receives no hits on google. An example ...
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A form of appealing to nature?

I'm wondering if you could say that this is a from of the Natural fallacy: Example 1: Evolution has made us omnivorous, therefore eating meat is correct. Example 2: Animals eat animals, I'm an ...
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Are there Decision Trees for Identifying Fallacies?

Question 1: What is the recommended methodology for identifying specific fallacies? Is there a "Decision Tree", or some other helpful approach? Question 2: Or, at the very least, are there ...
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Name of Formal Fallacy? Probability does not entail Certainty

Question 1: What is the name of the Formal Fallacy wherein a Deductive Conclusion is arrived at via the course of an Inductive Argument--which reduces the certainty of its own conclusion? ...
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Fallacy: Some things exist though no one thinks of them. So reality exceeds the mind's reach

Source: 6 minutes 4 seconds juncture, Lecture 12-4 (transcription), ... How to Reason and Argue, by Prof Ram Neta PhD (U Pittsbugh; in Philosophy) But not every attempt at reductio ad absurdum ...
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Fallacy: L is almost always wrong. D is L. So D is almost always wrong

Source: 7 minutes 22 seconds juncture, Lecture 12-3 (transcription), ... How to Reason and Argue, by Prof Ram Neta PhD (U Pittsbugh; in Philosophy) For want of brevity, I rewrite the noun phrase ...
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What's fallacious about 4 consecutive uses of modus pollens?

Source: 8 minutes 56 seconds juncture, Lecture 12-2 (transcription), ... How to Reason and Argue, by Prof Ram Neta PhD (U Pittsbugh; in Philosophy) Okay, now refutation by parallel reasoning ...
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Fallacy: Most E are I. Most I are S. So most E are S [closed]

Source: 6 minutes 8 seconds juncture, Lecture 12-2 (transcription), ... How to Reason and Argue, by Prof Ram Neta (PhD in Philosophy) [Premise 1:] Most people who start business[es] (Abbreviate as ...
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Asymmetries in two opposite arguments from ignorance

Joe claims: "There is no proof that unicorn exist, therefore unicorns do not exist". Alice claims: "There is no proof that unicorns do not exist, therefore unicorns exist". Bob claims: "There is no ...
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How do we know something is a “category mistake”?

I believe that Gilbert Ryle introduced the term "category mistake", but I am struggling to apply the term. Could you please give me an obvious and less obvious instance of a category-mistake? And if ...
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Is there a name for the fallacy to appeal to connotation of an ambiguous term?

Consider the following argument We all agree that sexism is bad. Sexism is the discrimination based on sex or gender. Discrimination is 1) the practice of unfairly treating a person or group of ...
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fallacy of equating terms based on shared properties

I've recently come across a particular errant pattern of argument a couple of times, and I'm wondering if there is a name for this fallacy. The form of the argument is: A has property X B has ...
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The fallacy of proving correctness by claiming opposing arguments as predictions under one's paradigm?

My religion foresees that you will deny the truth at first, but will eventually accept it. Correct me if I'm wrong, but there are two fallacies here: The argument above tries to subsume ...
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Is there a logical fallacy for “ignoring the specifics, over-applying the general”?

I haven't found a name for this fallacy, and perhaps it isn't one, but I would describe it as over-application of a general rule while disregarding specific information to the contrary. but here are ...
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55 views

What do we call this fallacy?

I was trying to answer the question on skeptics.se of whether hitler said that or not: “Who today still speaks of the massacre of the Armenians”? I quoted a research from Ataa.org, the assembly of ...
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What is the name given to a false comparison

Necessary background information I have recently started going back to the gym. Myself and my friend have both been suffering from muscle soreness. I decided to take a supplement known as creatine ...
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Fallacious: “God does not exist. Therefore, the argument for God's existence is not sound”?

The apologetic claims the argument is logically valid by modus tollens. The somewhat detailed version is: Premise 1. If Argument A for God's existence is sound, then God exists. Premise 2. But ...
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Faulty analogy and/or guilt by association

Suppose someone would argue that there is no difference between an anti-abortion display and a Ku Klux Klan display, because it offends women in the same way that a Ku Klux Klan stand would offend ...
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Fallacious Argument Name

Alice does something controversial for a particular reason. Her actions have bad and controversial consequences, but also have an outcome that she did not intend, which nearly everyone finds extremely ...
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Is there an onus on the critic to povide an alternative solution?

In many situations, when someone criticises a procedure, or a policy, a common response is something like "yeah, we know it's crap, but you're not presenting an alternative solution, so shut up". ...
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Doubting media accusations is 'Genetic Fallacy'?

[Source:] Example: Accused on the 6 0'clock news of corruption and taking bribes, the senator said that we should all be very wary of the things we hear in the media, because we all know how ...
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Cherry Picking Fallacy (In a Social Media Debate)

CONTEXT Hello, I'm an engineer with some introductory level studies in philosophy. I need help (or at least a sanity check) from this group in an argument about cherry picking. I'm having an argument ...
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Do malformed propositions have True/False values?

Many people are familiar with the malformed questions that, no matter which way they are answered, reflect poorly on the person to whom they were asked. For example: Have you stopped beating your ...
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How fallacious is tu quoque or look-who's-talking fallacy?

It is a very common fallacy that I've seen in many circles - In the world of media and in everyday life. In some cases it doesn't feel like a fallacy, but seems to make a point in that particular ...
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If you invalidate evidence based on where it came from is that the genetic fallacy?

For example if a group of Creationist Scientists presented evidence for their world view, would it be the genetic fallacy to invalidate their evidence because they are Creationists? Edit: there are ...
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Doesn't the upvote/downvote system just encourage the use of the “ad populum” fallacy?

I know that this would also depend on the integrity of the community, but I notice this happening a lot on Quora, and Yahoo answers. A lot of the time, the "best" answers aren't even structured ...
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Is this a fallacy: “You only X because you Y”

You only X because you Y. (with Y being true!) Example: Paul only defends the drug decriminalization because he has never been aggressed by a drug addict. Is this a fallacy? If not, how can we ...
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Is it an ad hominem attack to call somebody a troll?

Case 1: Person A criticizes person B. Person B says "We shouldn't feed the trolls. Best not to engage." Case 2: Person A voices their opinion on an issue being discussed on the forum. Person B says ...
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Philosophical bravado in science

[TLDR: is the argument in the last quotation a fallacy?] I'm an (academic) engineer, and I've been reading some papers on cybernetics from the 1950s and 60s. I found it striking how often the authors ...
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Problem of old evidence

I've come across the so-called "problem of old evidence" in Bayesian statistics/epistemology. First, let me summarize the problem as I see it so we're on the same page. Suppose I have a theory ...
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How's 'Is Tom Brady a cheater?' a 'straw-man expression…'?

Source, penultimate para: 'The Humiliation of Tom Brady', by Ian Crouch, 2015 Jan 23 ♦ “This has raised a lot of uncomfortable conversations from people around this country who view you, a ...
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Is it a fallacy to claim someone is committing a fallacy without explaining why?

Making use of an argument about a subject X, Person 1 presents his view to Person 2. Then Person 2, who is against that position, simply makes the following claim: "Hey dude, you have committed the ...
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Is it possible to appeal to emotion without commiting a fallacy?

People often make arguments from authority, and not all of them are fallacious. If the given authority is an expert on the discussed field, if there is a consensus among the experts of that field, and ...
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Common fallacy of everything being its worst form [closed]

What is the fallacy of equating everything with its worst example? Slippery slope argument I guess, but I"m looking for something more specific.
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Is it possible to make non-fallacious argument?

This is a list of fallacies: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fallacies Looking at this list, I can't imagine any non-trivial, non-mathematical (i.e., not a mathematical proof) argument that ...