concerns logical fallacies, which are errors in the logic or reasoning of an argument that result in a misconception or presumption

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Is one commiting the “argument from authority” fallacy and/or the “consensus fallacy” when one refers to a scientific consensus when asserting truth?

Bob and Alice disagree regarding subject X. Alice holds view A regarding subject X. Bob holds view B regarding subject X. View A and view B are quite contradictory views. Both can not be true at ...
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Name of fallacy when one says he used to have the same views

I was arguing with a friend (we were at loggerheads with respect to our views) and in the middle of the argument he refuted my claims by saying that even he used to have the same views (as I do now) a ...
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Is, “it won't make any different but I'm still choosing”, a logical fallacy?

If I make a non-random choice between two options and I claim my choice doesn't make a difference to the outcome, is this a logical fallacy? Or is it merely a lie in order to hide the underlying ...
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'proving prestige' vs 'asserting that purchasing those items will automatically bestow on us the glamor and prestige'

Source: pp 243-244, With Good Reason, An Introduction to Informal Fallacies (2000 6 ed) by York U. Prof. S. Morris Engel Just as we should guard against being taken in by an appeal to the ...
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Avis Rent-a-Car's slogan 'We're #2' : This is an Appeal to Pity?

Source: p 238, With Good Reason, An Introduction to Informal Fallacies (2000 6 ed) by York U. Prof. S. Morris Engel. Disclosure: I do not benefit or gain from, and am in no wise connected to, Avis. ...
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28 views

Why is it an Appeal to Pity if a defense attorney evidences misfortune of the defendant?

Source: p 236-237, With Good Reason, An Introduction to Informal Fallacies (2000 6 ed) by York U. Prof. S. Morris Engel   The trouble with such appeals [to Pity] is that, however are, they may ...
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24 views

Did Clarence Darrow really Appeal to Pity?

Source: p 236, With Good Reason, An Introduction to Informal Fallacies (2000 6 ed) by York U. Prof. S. Morris Engel A more straightforward example would be this statement to a jury by the renowned ...
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39 views

Please expose how Socrates subtly Appeals to Pity

Source: pp 235-236, With Good Reason, An Introduction to Informal Fallacies (2000 6 ed) by York U. Prof. S. Morris Engel   This fallacy [Appeal to Pity, abbreviated to AtP] is very common. It is ...
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Appeal to Pity? 'don't give me a ticket. My parents will take the car away from me and my life will be miserable.'

Source: p 214, With Good Reason, An Introduction to Informal Fallacies (2000 6 ed) by York U. Prof. S. Morris Engel Fallacy: Appeal to Pity Definition/Hints: Seeking to persuade not by ...
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Someone abandoning his own arguments

Is there a name for a fallacy when someone used an argument against his opponent, but abandoned that argument as "unimportant", "invalid" or "irrelevant" when it was turned against him?
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Claiming misrepresentation as a rhetorical device

Most of us are familiar with the Straw Man fallacy, and its sister the Principle of Charity. There's a rhetorical device which runs the opposite way, though, where (e.g.) Alice may claim that ...
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“The very fact you're asking means you know it's wrong” - which fallacy is it?

Does A possess property B? You asked -> you already know it does This tends to appear as responses to questions about fitness, law, morality, etc. This post does not quite cover it, and makes no ...
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31 views

Did Aristotle really apply the term 'accent'?

Source: p 114, With Good Reason, An Introduction to Informal Fallacies (6 ed, 2000) by York U. Prof. S. Morris Engel Unintended meanings can arise not only from faulty sentence, structure, as ...
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24 views

What underlying semantic notions connect the notion of 'thrown or hitting on both sides' to 'Amphiboly'?

Source: p 108, With Good Reason, An Introduction to Informal Fallacies (6 ed, 2000) by York U. Prof. S. Morris Engel The fallacy of amphiboly* is the product of poor sentence structure. It results ...
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40 views

Is there a name for the following gambling fallacy?

I'm writing a paper on the game of blackjack and I'm trying to make a point about how a common player's attitude is a logical/statistical fallacy in the following situation: When any common person ...
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Is there a name for the “A implies B, therefore not A implies not B” fallacy

A thumb & finger example: "If it's thumb, it's a finger. Therefore, if it's not a thumb, it's not a finger." Edit: There have been some answers rightfully pointing out that the example given ...
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What is the name of this fallacy: “You don't have an explanation for x but I do, so I'm correct and you are wrong”?

I hope this is the most correct stack exchange to ask this question. What is the name of the logical fallacy that follows: "You don't have an explanation for x but I do, so I'm correct and you are ...
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Logical fallacies made by philosophers

I'm looking for historical examples of logical fallacies (may be formal or informal) made by philosophers. Preferably as uncontroversial as possible.
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What's this logical fallacy?

Someone goes to the garage and says, "This car you sold me doesn't start." And the reply is, "Well, all machines have some problems." Where you attempt to invalidate a problem by putting it into a ...
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Something in Common, but Unequal

It is true that if two things---call them A and B---have something in common, it doesn't necessarily mean that A and B have everything in common. This is obvious. However, many people today reason in ...
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Logical fallacy of assuming people are stupid

I don't know if there's a specific name for this particular logical fallacy, but I see this rather often: An organization (government, corporation, etc.) announces some policy. The policy is irksome ...
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What is the fallacy where you completely discredit someone because of a single mistake?

Someone recently told me he felt that an entire scientific field's consensus is invalid because some of its scientists had come to what he believes were incorrect conclusions in the past. For example,...
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Is there a term for this logical fallacy: it rains because plants need water?

Is there a term for this kind of logical fallacy? Example: Q: Why does it rain? A: Because plants get thirsty and need water. The beneficiary of the effect is mistaken as the cause of the ...
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If metaphysical grounding of beliefs is not necessary what is to logically compel one to believe anything?

'Grounding' is the notion that 'because of X, Y', X being the reason one can accept Y beyond pragmatic considerations. In this way, X and Y are analogous to cause and effect respectively. If it is ...
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Is this a fallacy: no argument against X, therefore X?

Recently I was talking to a friend of mine, a vegan. Here's what she said: "I was talking to a vegan philosopher once, and he said that he is a vegan because there is no good argument against veganism"...
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Is there a term for this poor idealist argument?

I am engaged in the neverending disagreement with someone who argues, based on theory-ladenness, that there are no facts. Seems like they implicitly make the following moves, without explicitly ...
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Determining Fallacies

I am not very particular with the fallacy committed by each of the 2 statements: Many parents today believe that youth of today are very liberal and curious. Even though some of them are Catholics,...
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Logical fallacy classification: comparing the best from one group with the worst in another

I am looking for the name for the logical fallacy that compares the best samples from one group with the worst samples from the second group and concludes that the first group is better than the ...
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Can these examples alleging the Sunk Cost Fallacy really not be fallacies?

Sunk costs are costs that can not be recovered when new planning decision is made. Taking them into account is therefore characterized as a fallacy. But are the examples below really fallacies? [ ...
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Is “you're part of the problem” a logical fallacy?

I've heard many people say if you X, then you're part of the problem. I'm not a logic or philosophy expert so I was wondering if this is a logical fallacy (or something along those lines)? If so, what ...
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Repeatedly asking for definitions of common terms. Is this a fallacy?

Let's say that you provide the definition of a term to someone, and that person asks you to then define terms within that definition. When you do that, then this person asks you to keep defining other ...
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Where can I find logical fallacies in action?

Im looking for a website that gives logical fallacies in action. Not a video that explains logical fallacies, A video, say a debate between 2 people where one of the debators use a logical fallacy....
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What is the name of the following fallacy?

"You are worried about what person Y is saying. Therefore, Y is saying the truth." Context: A person X argues that Y is wrong about his view (let's suppose that X used arguments to support his ...
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Bias of conflating judgement with preference

Is there an established bias or possibly logical fallacy to describe a case when someone allows their personal strong preference for a particular outcome to fully cloud their judgement as to its ...
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Is there a logical fallacy for confusing a word's definition with it's connotation

I had originally asked this at English.SE, but a quick disagreement with some of the users, including a high-reputation user caused me to lose faith in the English.SE community to even Identify the ...
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35 views

If one is coerced into believing something that is actually true, have they truly been deceived?

Here, coercion is taken to be the method of persuasion which encompasses all logical fallacies; lying, lying by omission, or embellishment; emotional and otherwise logically unsound arguments; and ...
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Why do “mudslinging” arguments about opponents morality create a regress?

Consider this situation: Politician A "slings mud" at Politician B. Politician B accuses Politician A of being a mudslinger Politician A accuses B of being a hypocrite since accusing someone of ...
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Have any philosophers argued that ad hominems are sometimes valid?

As far as I can tell, the position that ad hominem attacks are always invalid seems to be widespread within the philosophical community. I'm not entirely convinced that this is a reasonable position, ...
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At which point is an insult no longer ad hominem?

During an argument with some people, I come to the conclusion that they are either stupid, ignorant or liars. Let's imagine that we have 2 guys discussing what color they should be painting a room. ...
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What fallacy dismisses a conclusion because supporters give invalid arguments for it?

A person dismisses an otherwise valid argument, because some of its proponents support it for the wrong reason. How is this fallacy called? EDIT: Here is an example. A person defends the idea that ...
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Whats the fallacy of diminishing one's faults by pointing that others are worse?

If someone responds with criticism of his country by pointing to some other less tolerant country and saying that 'See that country. That's called intolerance. And here's you criticizing us', what is ...
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Reverse tautologies in rhetorics

Recently I came across the following line of reasoning. The reason is because it is COMMON SENSE, which many do not have. Obviously something goes wrong here as per definition of common sense ...
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How to counter argument from silence?

When I argue with someone whether something is true, I often have to counter an argument like "If that were true, somebody would have proven it.". The premise of the other side is that there are ...
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Is there a logical fallacy in “dropping down” to a different level of abstraction?

Is there a logical fallacy for differing abstractive levels. As in, you start talking on the level of demographics until someone counters with verifiable data on the same level of abstraction, at ...
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35 views

Is there a name for the fallacy of “hypocrisy of a group”?

I feel like there has to be just because I see it so often. The statement is usually phrased as a question: "Why does group X believe thing Y but also contradictory thing Z?"—the mistake being that ...
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What makes the “lazy arguments” (you have no chance, so don't bother) valid or invalid?

What I am thinking of is not exactly like the Lazy argument described in Wikipedia. I am thinking of a general argument where a normative conclusion towards inaction is drawn from the knowledge of the ...
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What is the formal name for the desert island fallacy?

In my regular discussions with people, as people run out of logical approaches to an argument, I frequently come across the argument: ...but if you were stuck on a desert island, would you... ...
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Why cannot the Fallacy of Composition be combined with from Hasty Generalisation, and Division with Accident?

Abbreviate the Fallacy of: Hasty Generalization to HG, Composition to CMP, Division to DVN, and Accident to ACT. Source: A Concise Introduction to Logic (12 Ed, 2014) by Patrick Hurley [p 172:] ...
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Since ad hominem arguments affect credibility, how are they still fallacious?

Abbreviate Argumentum ad Hominem to AAH. For consistency, I use 'credibility' to mean both believability and credibility. Source: p 133, A Concise Introduction to Logic (12 Ed, 2014) by Patrick Hurley ...
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Why is there no fallacy, if an Argumentum ad Hominem attacks someone who is not arguing?

Abbreviate Argumentum ad Hominem to AAH and ad Hominem Abusive to AAHA. Source: p 132, A Concise Introduction to Logic (12 Ed, 2014) by Patrick Hurley Keep in mind that the purpose of an ad ...