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0answers
27 views

Mill's methods of agreement

I am reading a book on logic. I came across Mill's methods of agreement, which I don't fully understand. I understand that if something is the cause, then it is either a necessary/sufficient condition ...
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5answers
97 views

Is this a fallacy: no argument against X, therefore X?

Recently I was talking to a friend of mine, a vegan. Here's what she said: "I was talking to a vegan philosopher once, and he said that he is a vegan because there is no good argument against ...
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2answers
56 views

Is this type of induction a problem?

I can understand how the verification of hypotheseses based on inductive reasoning can be problematic, and I understand that a lot of prominent figures in philosophy are in opposition to this (Popper, ...
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4answers
74 views

How does a mechanism reduce 'the number of independent assumptions we need to make'?

The book only italicised; I added the majuscules. Source: pp 226-227, Think: A Compelling Introduction to Philosophy (1 ed, 1999) by Simon Blackburn  [...] As with Boyle's law, we can say that ...
6
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2answers
292 views

How can a false premise still produce a Strong Inductive Argument?

For brevity, I abbreviate: FP = False Premise, SIA = Strong Inductive Argument. Source: A Concise Introduction to Logic (12 Ed, 2014) by Patrick J. Hurley [p 46:] These four examples show that ...
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3answers
58 views

What aspects of the problem of induction are simplified if you employ the B-theory of time?

What aspects of the problem of induction are simplified if you consider the problem using the B-theory of time? A rough idea why this might be relevant: First consider an urn with a finite number of ...
4
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2answers
85 views

Bayesian statistics versus inductive skepticism

This is a question replicated here as advised by the statisticians' StackExchanged - see also http://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/178857/bayesians-positions-on-inductive-skepticism Philosopher ...
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1answer
33 views

Does induction presuppose simpler and more necessary inferences into the events in question, and if so, does this render the Humean analysis wounded?

Induction here is considered in light of the modern view, which is the practice of inferring from particulars to generals. Hume believes that such inference is very problematic since it holds two ...
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6answers
2k views

What is the difference between deductive and inductive reasoning?

I have been scouring over the internet in pursuit of a valid elaboration as to the difference between deductive and inductive reasoning, especially when explained using examples. The content that has ...
2
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3answers
220 views

Argument against democracy/socialism as an ethical system [closed]

If n=4 people showed up and told you, "we're going to take our combined wages and vote about what to do with half of it", most people would consider it theft at best. Even in theory, I can't imagine ...
2
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1answer
69 views

The relation between abduction and induction

This I hope is the last question I have, I am serious about researching this one! Is abduction a specie of induction? By which I mean to ask if we can adbuce what we could never know by induction. ...
4
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2answers
301 views

How does abstraction/generalization in mathematics fit into inductive reasoning?

I have a question about the nature of generalization and abstraction. Human reasoning is commonly split up into two categories: deductive and inductive reasoning. Are all instances of generalization ...
3
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3answers
225 views

What must nature's uniformity be like in order for scientific induction to be (non-deductively) valid?

I was thinking about one of the points made about induction, that it assumes that nature is uniform. So this leads me to the question about what this uniformity must be like in order for induction to ...
3
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4answers
1k views

Why is argument by analogy invalid?

There is a well known fallacy called the "argument by analogy" fallacy. As I understand it, the fallacy occurs in a situation where someone makes a reasonable comparison between two situations and ...
6
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6answers
441 views

What is the fallacy in this inductive argument for an infinite number of cities?

Think of a city, say the capital of Germany, Berlin. Now I can easily come up with another city, like San Fransisco. Now with two cities in mind, I can still come up with another city (Stockholm, for ...
2
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3answers
210 views

Has the Problem of Induction been solved?

The problem as to acquiring knowledge about times where we cannot experiment/observe. For e.g, you haven't seen the future, so you cannot make any definitive statements, or rather, scientifically ...
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1answer
88 views

What does Samir Okasha mean in this quote about converting invalid to valid argument?

I'm reading Samir Okasha's article "Does Hume’s argument against induction rest on a quantifier-shift fallacy?" and in page 240 there is this: Consider a typical inductive inference of the sort ...
6
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1answer
3k views

Is Poppers Solution to the Problem of Induction still valid?

Popper (negativly) solved the problem of induction by showing that there is no class of sentences (analytic/synthetic, a priori/a posteriori) in which a principle of induction can be phrased without ...
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1answer
1k views

What did Wittgenstein mean by saying that the belief in the causal nexus is a superstition?

In the Tractatus-Logicus Wittenstein says: 5.1361 The events of the future cannot be inferred from those of the present. Superstition is the belief in the causal nexus. I'm not quite ...
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2answers
1k views

Inductive reasoning and justification

Most people agree that knowing something one acquired from inductive reasoning is knowledge, that is justified true belief. For example we observed for years, that Sun rises from the East, we still ...
5
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1answer
233 views

Recursive definitions. Am I sane?

"The difference between me and a madman is the madman thinks that he is sane. I know that I am mad." ~ Salvador Dalí There are many terms defined in a recursive manner, e.g.: A person A is sane ...
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7answers
822 views

Why do we need a reason for believing that inductive method is necessarily true?

I've been a bit perplexed about the "problem" of induction. Hume challenges other philosophers to come up with a deductive reason for the inductive connection. If the justification of induction ...
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1answer
107 views

Popular exposition of the problem of induction

Is there a good survey article for lay readers (imagine an intelligent secondary-school pupil who may later do graduate work in philosophy but doesn't yet know much) of the philosophical difficulties ...
4
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5answers
659 views

How does induction relate to falsifiability?

I was thinking about the question How can I know that I am not immortal? and started wondering about the relation between induction and falsifiability. Regarding the cited question, one thinks: well, ...
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8answers
1k views

How can I know that I am not immortal? [closed]

You think that you will die just because everyone dies. And you would like to know if you are immortal. How can you know if you are immortal or not?
4
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1answer
188 views

Isnt induction just deduction with an implicit premise?

I have a problem with the distinction between induction and deduction. To me it does not make sense to talk about induction at all. People argue that the following is induction: A_1 is x A_2 is x ...
2
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1answer
197 views

Problem of induction without i.i.d

In this paper of Aaronson's, a proof is given of Occam's razor by appealing to PAC learning. My understanding of Valiant's bounds for PAC learners is that it requires i.i.d. This is often a ...
4
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1answer
673 views

What is the difference between the old problem of induction and Goodman's new problem of induction?

I just do not understand how he claims to have defeated the old problem.
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6answers
752 views

Does Karl Popper's work address the Principle of Uniformity of Nature?

It seems to me that Popper's solution does not address the more difficult problem of induction that Hume calls the Principle of Uniformity of Nature. In other words, we might find evidence against a ...
10
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2answers
824 views

What's the relevance of falsifiability in regards to logical arguments?

Is it reasonable to classify logical propositions that rely on deduction and are non-falsifiable as being inherently not worthy pursuing or does this just applies to inductive reasoning?