Ontology is the study of the nature of being, existence or reality as such, as well as the basic categories of being and their relations.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
1answer
23 views

When Heidegger talks about “Being” is it related to the totality of all entities in a unity “Being”?

When Heidegger talks about "Being" is it related to the totality of all entities in a unity "Being"? That is, by analogy, is the Being in Heidegger something like "Para Brahman" (in Hindu Philosophy) ...
-2
votes
0answers
29 views

How do I figure out how to program a program that will figure out how nothingness couldn't exist and thus created the first event? [closed]

Assume that there was a first event and before the first event there was nothingness. I already have an idea of how it would work and proof that there was nothing before the first event here
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Superposition principle: how additivity, linearity and orthogonality are related? [closed]

Suppose I throw in a blue color into the water. It becomes blue. It then also throw some salt into it, it becomes salty. The color and taste seem to be additive. But they also seem to be orthogonal -- ...
12
votes
10answers
1k views

How can something non-physical exist?

One sees arguments for the existence of non-physical entities such as God, qualia, Plato's forms, objective ethical truths, etc... But what does it mean for something non-physical to exist? It ...
0
votes
0answers
52 views

Derrida's “Strategic Bet”

I was wondering if anyone could help me understand what Derrida's "Strategic Bet” is? (from his “Ends of Man”). And also, how do the alternatives in the bet define deconstruction?
3
votes
2answers
97 views

Are normal numbers evidence true randomness exists?

Is the existence of normal numbers evidence true randomness exists, and in every possible world at that? Another mind blowing fact is that most of real numbers are normal, so the normal numbers is not ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

According to modal realism, how many possible worlds are there?

Modal realism tells us there is an infinity of possible worlds, but how many are there exactly? Is it countable infinity ℵ₀, uncountable infinity 𝖈, or some other, bigger uncountable infinity?
5
votes
1answer
69 views

Sartre's use of the word “Transcendence” and its meaning

I have been looking into some resources explaining Husserl's idea of transcendence and they point out that Sartre's idea of transcendence is based on Husserl's. Here are the different aspects/ideas of ...
8
votes
5answers
205 views

Something that has an end must have a beginning?

In ancient Hebrew book (http://dafyomireview.com/article.php?docid=398#ch5) dealing with logical proof of creation of the world. The following premise is established PROOF OF SECOND PREMISE - ...
6
votes
1answer
114 views

How does a realist account for causation between universals and particulars?

With respect to universals nominalists maintain that there are no universals and only particulars exists. Conversely, realists says that there are universals. Here is a sketch of an argument against ...
3
votes
2answers
97 views

Can the correspondence theory of truth really be completely avoided?

Let us assume that 'truth' is a construct of the human mind. In this case truth is defined as some product of the mind's 'verification', and nothing else. What 'makes' a statement true is simply the ...
4
votes
3answers
188 views

Is it possible to have faith in science while espousing anti-realism?

Realism is the theory that there is a mind-independent reality which we can know and interact with. Anti-realism holds, in general, either that there is no such mind-independent reality or that if ...
4
votes
3answers
54 views

What distinctions does Quine draw between ontological and ideological commitments?

Quine held in "On What There Is" the following: "A theory is commited to those and those entities to which the bound variables of the theory must be capable of referring in order that the ...
3
votes
4answers
94 views

Metaphysically, what comes before the cognitive ability to make distinctions?

Descartes, for example, makes the distinction between body and mind by recognizing the body as an idea born from 'extension' and the mind as an idea born from 'consciousness'. He further recognizes ...
7
votes
5answers
474 views

Are there philosophies that call for things which are not mind nor matter?

Physicalism is the idea that everything is matter. Idealism is the idea that everything is made up of a mental substance. Dualism claims that there are both matter and mind in the universe. It ...
2
votes
2answers
62 views

How does 'having an idea of something' differ from 'mental existence'?

Source: pp 38-39, Philosophy: A Complete Introduction (2012) by Prof Sharon Kaye (MA PhD in Philosophy, U. Toronto) Perhaps the problem lies in Anselm's twofold conception of existence. Anselm ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Philosophy term for “variation”

Thinking from a fundamental or foundational ontology perspective ... I want to read what philosophers have written about a concept which in my own mind I have been calling "variation". I am thinking ...
6
votes
1answer
131 views

What is Kant's view of a mathematical object?

I wonder what are mathematical objects - say, the number 1, a circle etc. - for Kant? Do they have some kind of special status for him compared to ordinary (empirical) objects? Where exactly he talks ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Meaning of Being in 'Being and Nothingness'?

I just started reading Sartre's magnum opus and right on page two he begins to mention that being and appearance dualism is no longer entitled to any "legal status within philosophy". What is the ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Question About The Purpose of Life [closed]

I’m not well read on philosophy, but often think about what you could call philosophical issues, such as the purpose of life and what it means to be good etc. I’ve been pondering one idea around the ...
13
votes
4answers
267 views

How can the physical world be an abstract mathematical structure?

This is Tegmark's short formulation of the "mathematical universe" (paraphrased by detractors as "reality made of math"), and he goes out of his way to stress that he means the "is" literally:"Whereas ...
3
votes
1answer
38 views

What's the difference between a philosophical ontology and a computational ontology?

A computational ontology is supposed to be decidable and tractable, how else is it different from a philosophical ontology? Is there a peer-reviewed explanation of the similarities and differences ...
2
votes
2answers
35 views

What would be the difference between property and kind?

Philosopher E.J. Lowe states that There is a clear difference between saying something like ‘Rover is a dog’, in which we assign Rover, a particular animal, to a certain natural kind or species, ...
5
votes
2answers
161 views

Did Kant come to believe that we have access to things-in-themselves after all?

Kant's position on things-in-themselves is often described Socratically, of them we know only one thing, that they are. However, in an old but apparently still popular history of philosophy book I ...
3
votes
5answers
292 views

What actually are meaningless symbols?

Some days ago our professor during the course of his lecture wrote the following definition of a polynomial. We say that an expression of the form a0 + a1x + a2x2 + ... + anxn is a polynomial of ...
1
vote
2answers
232 views

What is the difference between essential and existential ontology?

What are the differences between essential ontology and existential ontology? Does existential Ontology start with Heidegger. Is there any definition of both?
1
vote
2answers
94 views

How is conceptual irreducibility of the mental possible given a physicalist ontology?

In 'Mental Events' Davidson wrote "...mental events are mental only as described". Many have taken this and other of his remarks as showing that he holds that the anomalousness and irreducibility of ...
5
votes
3answers
130 views

Why did pre-Socratic philosophers take on the concept of 'being'?

Why did philosophers (starting from pre-Socratic f.e. Tales) take on the concept of 'being'? I see a chair and ... nothing. I do understand why they started to observe nature but why did they need to ...
7
votes
3answers
750 views

How many angels can dance on the head of a pin?

This question became a symbol for the silly and pointless sophistry of medieval scholastics. But as modern scholarship has shown scholastics was not such a thoughtless desert as some of its ...
3
votes
1answer
65 views

Does a rejection of the principle of sufficient reason result in blurring the distinction between being and non-being?

Celestine Bittle in 'Reality and the Mind' holds that if we do not grant that there is a reason for being rather than non-being, then there is no actual distinction between being and non-being since ...
6
votes
4answers
284 views

How are epistemological and ontological realism related?

The SEP article on idealism begins: ... [this article] examines the relationship between epistemological idealism (the view that the contents of human knowledge are ineluctably determined by ...
5
votes
1answer
88 views

Is there a word for the idea that the world is “a collection of collections”?

I'm looking for a (possibly ontological) recognised term for a theory that acknowledges that things can be broken down into smaller things - essentially components, parts and eventually atoms, quarks ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Can the principle of indiscernibility of identicals be restated as “I am what I think”? [closed]

I was reading Leibniz recently and had this epiphany, and thought why not see if any others out there might share a similar intuition. Concerning Leibniz's two principles of identity The ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Would truly random events be strictly equivalent to events without a cause?

There are a couple of questions (one, another) about this topic, and as I was thinking about this for a while, I started wondering whether there has been any systematic research into this that raises ...
6
votes
3answers
157 views

Does one have to become a Platonist to refuse to be a Platonist?

I believe the answer is no, but Scott Aaronson on his blog just gave in interesting argument to the contrary. This is in connection with the now famous paper Undecidability of the Spectral Gap, and ...
8
votes
2answers
130 views

Why do modern materialists tend to favor determinism?

There seems to be no logical link between matter and determinism (or ideal and indeterminism for that matter). And libertarian free will was first articulated by a materialist, Epicurus, and is ...
6
votes
2answers
166 views

Are arguments based on conceivability refuted by ideas from fantasy and sci-fi?

There are several arguments in metaphysics which are based on "conceivability": The ontological argument for God's existence. Hilary Putnam's Twin Earth argument for semantic externalism (the idea ...
4
votes
1answer
46 views

Are particulars knowable?

In the 13th thesis of the Incoherence, Al-Ghazali refutes the claim of the falsafa (peripatetic) philosophers that particulars aren't knowable by the First. Is this claim made on the basis that ...
4
votes
1answer
57 views

Can a materialist accept indeterminism? Can a reductionist?

The usual argument against it is that if behavior of matter is not fully determined by its state then it has to be determined by something else, ergo dualism. This begs the question however, unless we ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Is Socrates a substance?

Consider the following from Aristotles Categories: Substance, in the truest, primary and most definite sense of the word, is that which is neither predicable of a subject nor present in a subject. ...
4
votes
1answer
58 views

What distinguishes species from genus?

In Categories, Aristotle claims that all things that exist are either complex or simple; and the simple things can be classified into ten categories. The first and most basic category includes ...
5
votes
5answers
313 views

Does wave-particle duality pose a challenge to ontology?

Quantum mechanics poses a challenge to epistemology in terms of what is measurable, what is observable, and realism in general. But does it pose a challenge to ontology as well? Ontology is the ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

Does Aristotle have anything to say about the interpretative paradoxes of QM?

This follows this question The same question, angled a little differently suggests a family resemblence with the measurement paradox in QM: First and most broadly, QM is standardly said to have an ...
7
votes
2answers
161 views

Is Aristotle's resolution of Zeno's paradoxes vindicated by motion in the intuitionistic continuum?

In Physics VIII.8, Aristotle refers to his usual resolution of Zeno's paradox of motion: We should make the same response to anyone who uses Zeno's argument to ask whether it is always necessary ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

What does it mean to say that Kant has a twofold ontology?

What does it mean to say that Kant has a twofold ontology? If indeed he does have a twofold ontology. Is that like Descartes' res extensa and res cogitans?
5
votes
3answers
107 views

What are some good introductions to analytic ontology?

What is/are the best introduction(s) of analytic ontology? I know about a book written by Edmund Runggaldier ‎and Christian Kanzian but still I don't have it. I would like to read clear, simple ...
2
votes
0answers
46 views

On travelling through a void, constantly [closed]

I posted a question some time ago on how SR conceptualised space in the 'frame' of a photon - which appears as a kind of void - even though admittedly standardly its a move not allowed; but it was a ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Should it be the String Hypothesis rather than String Theory?

The question here is what is signified by the lexical token 'theory' in String Theory. It's something of a rhetorical question because it is, I think, used in a special sense by physicists; for ...
4
votes
2answers
76 views

Does definition of Fact in philosophy have any relation with time and place?

Does definition of Fact in philosophy have any relation with time and place? If yes, then is it justified to say that "Fact is a Fact irrespective of one's awareness of it being true"? For example: ...
2
votes
4answers
136 views

What is the name of the position which claims that “everything that is possible, exists”?

Question. What is the name of the following position? Everything that is possible, exists. Thus, in particular, every possible universe actually exists, as a concrete reality. I don't mean ...