for applied philosophical questions about the study of science, the pursuit of scientific knowledge, and the scientific method

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Does fallibilism carry an ontological commitment?

When I was a grad student in psychology, I audited a 20th century philosophy of science course. I did my best to absorb all the great discussions, but one remark the professor made continues to bother ...
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2answers
70 views

What do you think? A blogger's thought and Mine : Falsifying Test

When I was googling with word "Marx, Wittegenstein", I encountered an very interesting site. The site owner ( the blogger ) asks, "Popper is not conducting his own theory, Falsifying test. Is it not ...
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6answers
234 views

Is atheism or agnosticism more rational?

While there is still widespread disagreement regarding the existing definition of atheism, it is normally considered as the "Rejection of belief in the existence of deities". One accepted definition ...
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0answers
38 views

Elizabeth Lloyd [closed]

I loved the paper by Elizabeth Lloyd. It was interesting and I laughed several times while reading it. Although I enjoyed it, I wonder if I got the point. While reading it I kept thinking that it ...
2
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2answers
47 views

“The Logic of Emotion” by Robert C. Solomon

What is this essay talking about? Did anyone read this before? Solomon thinks that emotions can be logical and he talks a lot about many kinds of emotional theories. If you have read it, would you be ...
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1answer
37 views

Is Platonism a “religion”?

Having some general knowledge of Platon, and his ideas about the world of Ideas, could we consider his world of Ideas a divine world? Isn't that the same as the world of God? What makes religion ...
2
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3answers
74 views

If mathematics is the language of quantitative thinking, what exactly is the language of qualitative thinking? Please read

I always try to classify disciplines into three groups; the qualitative, the quantitative, and amalgam of the two. Whenever I think of qualitative disciplines, or those that involve value-judgments, ...
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0answers
18 views

Reward system of recognition

As I was reading about Merton's idea of the reward system a few questions came to me. Godfrey Smith states that the idea of the reward system comes from Merton, and the basic currency for scientific ...
3
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2answers
47 views

Norms of Merton

I had some trouble understanding two of the norms held by Merton. The first norm that I had trouble understanding is universalism. Godfrey Smith describes this as the idea that scientists should ...
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1answer
43 views

Understanding symmetry

having a hard time understanding the “symmetry principle.” For the most part I understand it on a sentence to sentence level, but can’t seem to put it together. In Godfrey Smith he states that ...
7
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1answer
824 views

Does the recent “uproar” against Philosophy have any historical roots?

For instance, Stephen Hawking once claimed: Philosophy is dead Figures such as Einstein were quite interested in the Philosophy of science. In addition to this, a fair amount of Philosophers ...
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1answer
42 views

How objective can morality be? [closed]

We all make assumptions, but there are assumptions that we are forced to make if we want to interact with any part of reality. The first is that the universe exists. The second is that the universe is ...
6
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4answers
229 views

Theories in science that make claims that are not empirical in nature

Does it make sense in science to have theories that make claims that are not empirical? By a non-empirical claim, I mean something that cannot be tested by means of observation or experimentation. I ...
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2answers
147 views

A Kantian view on modern physics

According to the Encyclopedia Britannica article on Immanuel Kant, in the section discussing the Critique of pure reason: In the Transcendental Analytic, the most crucial as well as the most ...
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1answer
40 views

Are ceteris paribus laws of nature tautologies?

A traditional conception of a law of nature views a hypothesis holds necessarily when it takes the logical form: (P1) All A's are B's (P2) O is an A (C) Therefore O is a B. The large number of ...
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7answers
241 views

How Does Modern Science 'Know' there is no God? [duplicate]

As pointed out in this question, there is no hard scientific evidence of the existence of an existentially all-powerful being. As there is no direct evidence that there is a God, there is also no ...
3
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10answers
305 views

Belief in God in the context of modern science

My question is this: How can someone living in such a world and age possibly believe in God? To elaborate, I think I understand where religion and the belief in supernatural stems from. It was our ...
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4answers
147 views

Causation, Correlation, and the Scientific Method

It is widely known that correlation does not necessarily imply causation. However, after recognizing that the correlation alone doesn't prove causation, what needs to happen in order to evaluate ...
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0answers
37 views

Philosophically (through logic and reason) how does one get to liberty, freedom, destiny from positivism--raw science?

Auguste Comte was so 'positive' that there could be no metaphysical system, no explanation of essences (no need for such in an 'enlightened' age). He thought citizens should be trained only to look ...
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3answers
83 views

What can science assert

According to Lawrence Krauss, science cannot not exactly say 'always' or 'never'. We all know that's for sure because most of science theories relies on inductive arguments. But then he adds: 'What ...
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3answers
76 views

Philosophical bravado in science

[TLDR: is the argument in the last quotation a fallacy?] I'm an (academic) engineer, and I've been reading some papers on cybernetics from the 1950s and 60s. I found it striking how often the authors ...
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16answers
10k views

Why aren't creationism and natural science on the same level? (Or are they?)

In the infamous creation museum a strategically very shrewd exhibit, where a scientist and a biblical scholar both study the same fossils, is being presented: The sign says “different ...
3
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2answers
81 views

Can science remain objective when it is embedded in a world of politics? [closed]

Is science objective or, like other social creations, fundamentally tied to politics? First, science is operated by humans and its data and interpretations come from a political human who must always ...
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2answers
54 views

How do social sciences today tend to see the contributions of biology and other natural sciences? [closed]

The old debate "nature" vs. "nurture" has given space to a new debate between "natural sciences" vs. "postmodernism" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science_wars, ...
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1answer
70 views

Problem of old evidence

I've come across the so-called "problem of old evidence" in Bayesian statistics/epistemology. First, let me summarize the problem as I see it so we're on the same page. Suppose I have a theory ...
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2answers
70 views

Holism, reductionism and emergence

I try to understand the difference between holism and reductionism and I wonder whether the concept of emergence belongs to the first one or whether it is just "holism through the eyes of a ...
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4answers
125 views

What is the opposite of the reductionist approach?

I am searching for two opposite words in philosophy of science to describe two opposite approaches in physics. To illustrate what I am searching for I will use statistical physics and particle physics ...
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3answers
111 views

Speculative realism: Does changing law of nature collapse the ancestral argument? [closed]

Lets say, I am an astronomer, Bob Down jr. When I was twelve years old I was a perfect naive realist. I did know nature as something bigger and more powerful than me. Not that I had no power. No ...
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2answers
52 views

Human belief systems and reason [closed]

Belief puts people into action, but often action is needed before belief to develop something in order to be able to believe in it in the first place, or at least so it seems. It seems to me that ...
3
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1answer
61 views

Bayesian Confirmation - Justifying Bayes's Rule

I'm reading through these notes I found online, and I'm having a bit of trouble distinguishing Bayes's Theorem and Bayes's Rule. The central idea of Bayesian Confirmation Theory is that the our ...
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0answers
26 views

field concept - historical and contemporay perspectives?

Can someone give me some reference (or insight) on the development of the field concept in physics. In particularly, the period between 17th century Newton/Leibniz notion of force/action-at-distance ...
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2answers
49 views

Are “intelligent systems” really intelligent? [closed]

For the scope of this question, let's consider an intelligent system as something with the properties of accomplishing some kind of goal(s). By this definition, all people are technically intelligent ...
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2answers
55 views

In a way, isn't everyone biased somehow? [closed]

You hear people say that you ought to see an "expert" to get unbiased viewpoints. Isn't that largely based on the assumption that experts are unbiased? Or is it believed that smarter people in, say, ...
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0answers
58 views

Hegel's measure as gauge

In Book I, third section, first chapter of Science of Logic, Hegel makes it rather clear, I find, that the measure that he is talking about -- at least in its aspect as specifying measure -- is a ...
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5answers
100 views

Must consciousness display intentionality?

Husserl affirmed intentionality as characteristic of consciousness. If matter can be conscious, as in Lucretious atoms of anima, and in Tegmarks baroque but physicalist constructions; must matter, to ...
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4answers
378 views

What is the intersection of Physics & Philosophy?

(I've already asked this question on Meta, but as one answer (by Joseph Weissman) pointed out this is already a philosophical question; so I thought it worth asking here). I've asked a number of ...
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1answer
39 views

wavefunction and contextuality

According to the French philosopher Michel Bitbol, the "deep-lying connection between the contextual character of observables, and the wave-like form of probability distributions was demonstrated ...
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3answers
101 views

On the foundations of physics

Scientific theories in physics have to be validated by experiments. But experiments are to be interpreted in the context of scientific theories. Isn'it like a snake biting its own tail? For example, ...
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10answers
445 views

Is there any reason to believe that there are things which science cannot tell us?

Science can only tell us a posteriori synthetic truths, can this category extend to all propositions about the world. Surely the only things which can by known ONLY by a priori analytic are ...
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3answers
124 views

How do laws of nature enforce themselves?

The Humean view prevailing today is that laws of nature are mere regularities of the empirical events. However, there seems to be a difference between post factum regularities, like the Titius-Bode ...
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3answers
103 views

Is the science Physics allowed to ignore the rules of Philosophy of Science resp. the Scientific Method [closed]

The Scientific Method in Science determines that premises, on which a theory is based, must be experimental verified, when possible. It is however possible that theories of the past are based on ...
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3answers
149 views

Can definitions be experimentally tested?

The present Wikipedia article on the Scientific method, section "Elements of the scientific method" states: Four essential elements of the scientific method are iterations, recursions, ...
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1answer
75 views

Kuhn's demarcation criterion

What was Kuhn's demarcation criterion to determine whether something is or is not science? I know that he spoke about paradigms, but do those define what is or is not science? Or is it about puzzle ...
3
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3answers
406 views

Is homeopathy verifiable?

Would homeopathy be verifiable according to the logic positivists (and thus science)? On the one hand, one could, in principle, observe patients recovering after being given a homeopathic medicine. ...
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4answers
347 views

Is Galileo's argument about falling bodies logically flawed?

Galileo's famous argument against the Aristotle's theory of falling bodies goes like this. "Let's say heavy objects do fall faster than light ones. Then it seems the heavier weight will fall with the ...
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2answers
62 views

Is medicine falsifiable?

Would modern medicine be falsifiable according to Popper? What about alternative medicine, such as homeopathy? My problem with this, is that I imagine such falsification depends on double blind ...
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1answer
42 views

An article by Jacob Pandian [closed]

There is an article named "The Dangerous Quest for Cooperation Between Science and Religion" by Jacob Pandian. I could not find it online. The article is also in a book Science and religion: Are they ...
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5answers
696 views

What is the philosophy behind the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics?

Perhaps it is a stereotype, but I assumed that most physicists are empirical realists (external reality affects our senses, and science infers a representation of it from sensory data). At the same ...
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5answers
121 views

Would this morality be truly objective?

I'll be working on the assumption that the general scientific consensus is correct and that the evidence does, indeed, point inescapably towards the fact that we are primates with a well-developed ...
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3answers
127 views

Dark Forest Postulate used to explain the fermi paradox?

This is the founding premise of science fiction "The Three Body Problem" It starts with two axioms Survival is the most important goal of every civilization Every civilization will continue to ...