Physics is the natural science that involves the study of matter and its motion through space and time, along with related concepts such as energy and force. More broadly, it is the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the universe behaves.

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Precedent for the idea of superluminal choice

What might happen were the speed of light to be exceeded is a subject of hot debate in the philosophy of modern physics. Therefore, this is of interest to philosophy. The most straight-forward way I ...
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77 views

Holism, reductionism and emergence

I try to understand the difference between holism and reductionism and I wonder whether the concept of emergence belongs to the first one or whether it is just "holism through the eyes of a ...
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131 views

What is the opposite of the reductionist approach?

I am searching for two opposite words in philosophy of science to describe two opposite approaches in physics. To illustrate what I am searching for I will use statistical physics and particle physics ...
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26 views

field concept - historical and contemporay perspectives?

Can someone give me some reference (or insight) on the development of the field concept in physics. In particularly, the period between 17th century Newton/Leibniz notion of force/action-at-distance ...
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141 views

Quantum Mechanics and Radical Constructivism

Is there an interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM) based on radical constructivism? If yes, what construction of QM does it suggest? If no, can you speculate on such interpretation? So far my ...
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39 views

wavefunction and contextuality

According to the French philosopher Michel Bitbol, the "deep-lying connection between the contextual character of observables, and the wave-like form of probability distributions was demonstrated ...
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102 views

On the foundations of physics

Scientific theories in physics have to be validated by experiments. But experiments are to be interpreted in the context of scientific theories. Isn'it like a snake biting its own tail? For example, ...
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88 views

What is the entropy of the universe at the time of the Big Bang? [closed]

High entropy generally means high disorder; and low entropy low disorder; the two paradigmatic cases that illustrate these two possibilities is a gas, for the first, and a crystal for the second. ...
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133 views

Is the science Physics allowed to ignore the rules of Philosophy of Science resp. the Scientific Method [closed]

The Scientific Method in Science determines that premises, on which a theory is based, must be experimental verified, when possible. It is however possible that theories of the past are based on ...
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72 views

Should the easiness with which math is applied to the world be a surprise?

I study physics at an undergraduate level. Since early on, I've was a person who thought math was 'logical' and as such, its applications to the world aren't really a surprise since math is so ...
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3answers
101 views

Which physical phenomena are not objects?

I come from the world of OOP programming and I find OOP terms convenient to describe everything that has properties or fields and possibly some actions that may be applied to its properties/fields. ...
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436 views

How could our universe suddenly appear out of nothingness?

How could our universe suddenly appear out of nothingness? I understand that the big bang created all things but how could it when nothingness is purely the absence of everything?
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127 views

Does mathematics apply to physics in one way or multiple ways?

Does mathematics apply to physics in one way or multiple ways? What do Aristotle and Plato think? It would seem that Aristotle thinks mathematics can be applied to physics in one way only because, ...
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5answers
302 views

Is it theoretically possible for a bottomless pits to exist in a finite universe?

Assuming that our universe is finite, is it still theoretically possible to have a bottomless pit? This all really depends on the definition of bottomless pit. I don't know that I can accurately ...
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77 views

Can anyone explain the very beginning of The Analysis of Matter to me?

Can anyone explain the very beginning of The Analysis of Matter to me? What exactly is it that he is saying is an aesthetic choice with respect to physics? I just opened up the book and can't get ...
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98 views

Is the Kuhnian paradigm shift (or sublation) materialistic or idealistic?

Kuhns book The Structure of scientific revolution is based on Hegels philosophy of history and uses, as Hegel did, the dialectic as the motor of history. What Kuhn terms paradigm shifts, in Hegelian ...
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65 views

Epicureanism and speed of light

I have heard that Epicurus stated that light has the speed of thought. What did he mean by this? My hypothesis is he intended to say, in a way, that the speed of light is infinite. But then, why was ...
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118 views

Discovering inter-atomic forces or taking Newtons law seriously

I've already asked this question on Physics.SE, but it got no response; its not a conventional physics question, but really on how to interpret physical equations and physics. Newtons law of gravity ...
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158 views

Illogical part of universe

This question is based on many assumptions: That since universe could not appear out of itself and could not be created by someone there has to be a other part of 'universe' (I am not sure if ...
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3answers
102 views

Name of approaches of physics in terms of laws vs in terms of correlations?

I am not an expert in epistemology and I am currently searching for the name of a particular approach in physics (an historical one). Since Galileo, the role of the physicist is to simplify the ...
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111 views

What is the difference between determinism and superdeterminism?

I know I need to add some body to the question, so I'll give you some links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Determinism and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superdeterminism. I have seen some comments that ...
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182 views

Could our universe simply be abstract mathematical existence?

Say we imagined a mathematical model so detailed that it completely describes a universe like our own. Now if we simulated such a universe on a futuristic supercomputer then obviously the beings ...
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323 views

Nothing, God & Physical law

Mary-Jane Rubenstein writes in Cosmic Singularities At first blush, Hawking’s and Mlodinow’s “nothing” seems even more of a nothing than the church fathers’ nothing. For whereas Irenaeus’ and ...
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118 views

infinite times zero and smallest division of space? [closed]

What will happen if you add zero infinite times?Take a scale of any length say 'x' metre and divide it infinite times.Two coincidence facts should be noted here. First we will never reach the infinith ...
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324 views

What empirical evidence would exclude the Intelligent Designer hypothesis?

While there aren't indisputable (to say the least) arguments supporting the Intelligent Designer thesis, I had never seen (or imagined myself) an argument that could definitively debunk this ...
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208 views

What is the ontological status of information that is permanently inaccessible to any conceivable observer?

Rovelli & others, in Relational Quantum Mechanics (RQM) take the simple ontological picture of the Copenhagen Picture and relativise it. This is what I was suggesting in this question, though I ...
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621 views

Can 'Nothing Exist before we measure it'?

Bohr famously said in relation to quantum systems: Nothing exists until we measure it This can't be right, for how can we measure Nothing, something that doesn't exist. It seems it must come ...
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543 views

Physics, Theoretical Understanding and the Limits of Human Knowledge/Understanding

During an interview with Discover magazine, Roger Penrose makes the claim that a lot of the most theoretical physics, a la the physical theories that try to account for the discrepancies and ...
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256 views

Quantum Mechanics and Free Will

From my understanding, a Mixed Quantum State defines the set of all probable outcomes for a system, but isn't there still only one outcome determined through the succession of factors leading up to it ...
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357 views

“Why” vs. “How” in the Experimental Sciences

Based on the lively discussion of this question over at physics.stackexchange, I thought it might be useful to ask it here as well. The kernel of the debate is whether or not "why" questions are ...
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61 views

Objective qualia definition

I thought of an, as I think, objective definition of qualia which is this: In any material (= physical) system a quale is defined by a boundary from the containing universe and with a negative ...
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71 views

Logics Epistemology: Can Maths and physics meet in one point

Is logics (logic rules, arithmetic and logic inference) universe-dependent or not. In other words: are logic rules ultimately physical laws of the universe (as gravity, quantum laws and ...
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2k views

How can I develop my critical thinking skills?

I am a freshmen engineering student going to college. I want to learn how to think critically and become a critical thinker and a sharp arguer. I am interested in philosophy, because I am curious ...
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159 views

Was Newtons corpuscular theory of light influenced by that of Democritus?

Democritus theory of perception hypothesised that eidola were atom-thin images of an object carried into the eye. Of course Newton was a prominent defender of a corpuscular theory of light, as first ...
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236 views

Can the observer be the observed?

As a supplement to this question as to whether particles can be observers, supposing that the answer is yes. One could suppose a setup where particle A is observing particle B, but what to stop us ...
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98 views

Should turbulence be thought of as a saturated phenomenon?

Turbulence appears in many ways, independently of the system that supports its manifestations. In all cases, it can be seen that: a) Its manifestations are irreversible, in the sense that one cannot ...
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136 views

Why do all consciousnesses seem to be in the present?

We exist across time, but have this special place in time called the present. In my naive thinking about the present, it doesn't seem to have any special significance except that all consciousnesses ...
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332 views

Why can the human mind perceive things that are not reality, despite being born from it?

If man is born from the universe, we are a product of the universe. This much is certain. However we as people have the ability to fabricate thoughts and ideas that are completely fictional and ...
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232 views

Are electron fields physically real?

Although atoms had been discussed since antiquity as a theory of matter it was only at the beginning of the 20th century that convincing evidence was found, through brownian motion - in fact this was ...
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154 views

What are the philosophical implications of the fact that Rule 110 is universal?

I just read the Wikipedia article on Rule 110 and there was a short remark that the simplicity of that rule might imply that it can exist in physical systems in nature. "Physical systems may also be ...
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140 views

Physics and Nozick's explanatory self-subsumption

What happened with Nozick's idea of the self-subsuming explanation after his Philosophical Explanations? In particular and actually only, I'm interested to learn about published attempts to use or ...
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188 views

Is time “Unreal”? [closed]

In 5th century BC Greece, Antiphon the Sophist, in a fragment preserved from his chief work On Truth, held that: "Time is not a reality (hypostasis), but a concept (noêma) or a measure ...
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5k views

What does Einstein's quote “If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts” mean? [closed]

What did Einstein really mean by saying: If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts.
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151 views

How would you describe the relationship of science and philosophy of science?

How would you describe the relationship of science and philosophy of science? Is it a worldview that sets a tone to scientific jargon? I mean that statements of eg. physics are under submission of the ...
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386 views

Can anything truly be simultaneous?

I was looking at a discussion about simultaneous causation and something that came up was that all physical processes take time. So nothing can truly be simultaneous. And yet, we have philosophers ...
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281 views

Materialism and magnetism

Going by its Wikipedia page, materialism has been largely discredited due to advances in physics as it cannot explain phenomena such as gravity which apparently exist without the connivance of matter. ...
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334 views

Regarding platonism, and the absurd applicability of mathematics to physics

I am much interested in discussions such as Wigner's "The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences". It's quite amazing that mathematics so well applies to our universe, and ...
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101 views

Does the Weak Anthropic Principle make certain assumptions about the nature of sentient biological organisms?

There are various forms of the Anthropic Principle, and the Weak Anthropic Principle in the version stated by Barrow and Tipler roughly says that the observed values of the physical and cosmological ...
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874 views

How to understand numbers that become really large?

If we begin with a notion of number N that we denote F(N) as a function of time, can a decidable procedure exist on definability of the growth of numbers? Inspired by Tipler's Omega point and ...
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367 views

What is the “New Essentialism”?

Is the "New Essentialism" simply a return to Aristotelianism masked in new terminology, or is it a novel contribution to modern philosophy? See: Brian Ellis's Philosophy of Nature: A Guide to the ...