The study of terms and their use.

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What do you call the output of a truth table?

I know that the value of said output can be either True of False, but what is the actual output called? Another way of phrasing the question is, is what do you call the resolution of a complex ...
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108 views

What does the term “mathematical logic” mean?

What is "mathematical logic"? Is it the logic of mathematical reasoning, or is it the claim that mathematics and logic are identical? Also, is "quantificational logic" a particular type of ...
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The definition of a possible world

I have a two-part question about the definition of a possible world. I will make the assumption that time is tensed. First of all, is a possible world a complete list of all propositions that are ...
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Difference between classification and prioritization

What is the difference between classification and prioritization in a depth way? What are the steps requiered in each one?
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What do you call a statement that is accepted as true but has never been proved?

What do you call a statement P which has never been formally proved but all the observations so far verify it? This question comes from this scenario: some people use a software for work. They often ...
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50 views

What is the definition of love according to Nietzsche?

I just read Thus Spoke Zarathustra, and the word love is mentioned many times in the book. Nonetheless, I don't recall an exact definition of what love is, according to the author. Did I miss it, or ...
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Could relativity have been proven without classical physics? [closed]

Could relativity have been proven without classical physics? What is the term for this, in the philosophy of science?
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Sartre's use of the word “Transcendence” and its meaning

I have been looking into some resources explaining Husserl's idea of transcendence and they point out that Sartre's idea of transcendence is based on Husserl's. Here are the different aspects/ideas of ...
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Can I say that extension is a synonym for isomorphism?

I read in Necessity and Sufficiency that For example, in graph theory a graph G is called bipartite if it is possible to assign to each of its vertices the color black or white in such a way ...
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63 views

Is there such thing as a fully secular writing?

This started as what was thought to be a simple English usage question to help me with a presentation. I wanted an umbrella term for writing that has no intrinsic or explicit connection to religion ...
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Can I use “nomothetic” to refer to the calculus correctness perspective in the Tractatus?

I'm doing a comparison between the Tractatus Logico Philosophicus and the Philosophical Investications. I want to remark the difference between the solid formal edifice built in the former, in ...
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39 views

A form of Presentism [closed]

I don't know much about philosophical terms or movements, so I am curious as to whether there is a movement or term for non-conditional decision making. That isn't a formal term that I used above and ...
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Why did Kant import the Greek 'nooúmenon' for describing his noumenon?

Source: p 216, Philosophy: The Classics (4 ed, 2014) by Nigel Warburton PhD in Philosophy (Cambridge) Kant distinguishes between the world we experience (the world of phenomena), and the ...
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What is a mental state?

A great deal of the theory of mind is based upon supposedly obvious observations about our mental states. E.g. that they are immediately available, or that they are introspectable, at least in ...
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54 views

Meaning of Being in 'Being and Nothingness'?

I just started reading Sartre's magnum opus and right on page two he begins to mention that being and appearance dualism is no longer entitled to any "legal status within philosophy". What is the ...
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38 views

What's the difference between a philosophical ontology and a computational ontology?

A computational ontology is supposed to be decidable and tractable, how else is it different from a philosophical ontology? Is there a peer-reviewed explanation of the similarities and differences ...
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What is 'major' about the major term in logic? [closed]

Source: p 264, A Concise Introduction to Logic (12 Ed, 2014), by Patrick J. Hurley Each of the three terms in a categorical syllogism has its own name depending on its position in the argument. ...
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What does Russell mean by “term” in Principles of Mathematics?

Bertrand Russell in Principles of Mathematics defines a term as "Whatever may be an object of thought, or may occur in any true or false proposition or can be counted as one." Can someone elaborate on ...
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Where can I learn the etymology behind the terminology of philosophy?

Though language can be illogical and irrational, this question presupposes against randomness (ie: the following also applies to terminology in philosophy): Source: p 381, An Introduction to ...
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72 views

What are the etymologies of 'subcontrary' and 'subalternation'?

Below are some examples of terms in philosophy with Latin etymons, whose semantic changes elude me. For example, how does adding the prefix 'sub-' to 'contrary' motivate the definition of ...
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55 views

What is the philosophical definition for Agnosticism (compared to Atheism/Theism)? [closed]

Is there an agreed upon definition for Agnosticism from a philosophical perspective? Is there a proper philosophical categorization of it compared to theism/atheim? Looking through the literature I ...
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How was 'Argumentum ad Verecundiam' adopted to mean 'Appeal to Unqualified Authority'?

Source: p 143, A Concise Introduction to Logic (12 Ed, 2014) by Patrick J. Hurley We saw in Chapter 1 that an argument from authority is an inductive argument in which an arguer cites the ...
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How does philosophy categorize practical advice on how to live?

I am reading a book on productivity. "Getting Results the Agile Way" (J.D. Meier) is the specific book, but substitute your favorite "pop psychology" book on anything from productivity to parenting ...
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What is the difference between Philosophy and Theology?

In attempting to wrap my mind around the basic vocabulary, concepts, and methods of philosophy, I find myself wondering what the difference is between a philosopher and a theologian. Theology (link ...
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What is the philosophical doctrine that most closely corresponds to the listed positions? [closed]

I would like to ask for a possible classification of the following philosophical positions: Everything is a simple result of natural occurances and as such lacks any objective value. Even if a god ...
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What is the philosophical difference between “Reality” and “Truth”? [closed]

While talking philosophically, I want to know the difference between Reality and Truth. Especially while Asking this question, I've used Reality/Truth because I don't know How they are different in ...
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Can analytic philosophy today be divided into a given number of basic, contending positions?

This question is asked out of a relative ignorance of "analytic" or "Anglo-American" proceedings, so broad, simplified answers are quite welcome. A slew of terms may be used to characterize the ...
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Is it possible to define “the supernatural”?

From a naturalistic perspective, it is possible to argue that the supernatural not only doesn't exist, but cannot even be defined. The reasoning goes that anything which "appears" to be supernatural, ...
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What is the name of the position which claims that “everything that is possible, exists”?

Question. What is the name of the following position? Everything that is possible, exists. Thus, in particular, every possible universe actually exists, as a concrete reality. I don't mean ...
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How does strong evidence imply truth?

I have seen a great number of individuals who take a step from "There is overwhelming evidence to suggest theory X is true" to "Theory X is true." (I think I misworded the former sentence ...
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Definitions of: Fact, Theory, Hypothesis, Evidence and prediction [closed]

Motivations I recently answered to this question on Biology.SE. The question asks: Is evolution a fact? Is it true that human and chimpanzee evolved from ape? In my answer I started with a tiny ...
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What is the definition of truth-preservation?

To my knowledge truth preservation is a property of a valid deductive argument, but I can't really find a definition of it. I feel like mine is lacking, but here is my tentative definition: "Truth ...
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107 views

Is religion a kind of mythology, or the opposite?

Can we define religion as "the mythologies that don't assume they are mythologies"? First, mythology is the oldest way of describing Nature. Polytheisms, extant or extinct, usually know|knew their ...
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Is this a transcendental philosophical question?

If I ask the question: "Is it possible to define knowledge by proving that there exists something that can't be known?" to which branch of philosophy does this question belong? Is it transcendental ...
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What minimally counts as “neo-Kantian”?

The term neoKantian gets applied to a wide range of philosophers, from Helmholtz and Cassirer to Kuhn and even, I have heard, Foucault. I presume that most versions of neo-Kantianism today take on a ...
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What do we call one's personal circle of knowledge and who wrote about it?

Somebody reached out to me with the following funny phrase: If you ever laugh at a person telling you a joke in your dreams you’re laughing at your own joke (Source) I'd like to elaborate on ...
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Where does Wilfred Sellars stand in current curricula?

I realize this is more of a question about "culture" of philosophy and answers will be relative. As an autodidact, beginning largely in the Continental tradition, it is sometimes hard for me to know ...
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Thin conceptions of time

WIkipedia says: In philosophy, a thick concept (sometimes: thick normative concept, or thick evaluative concept) is a kind of concept that both has a significant degree of descriptive content ...
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What is the difference between a probability and a possibility?

I ask this in a fairly naive way. I understand that "probabilities" can be quantified in frequencies, degrees of belief, etc. with some defined "space" of probability.But I know little about modal ...
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Is there a school of thought that considers human less significant than other beings?

When discussing animal rights with friends, we talked about Anthropocentrism, Biocentrism and Ecocentrism. We were wondering if there is a school of thought that is the opposite of Anthropocentrism, ...
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Newtons law saved by ad-hoc hypothesis?

In the early 1800’s it was found that the observed orbit of Uranus deviated from the theoretical predictions (based on Newton’s theory of gravity and a seven planet model of the solar system). Instead ...
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Name for the “cut” between an agent and its environment

This question broadly regards the Denettian "intentional stance" to agency, which says that on the most fundamental level there are only physical things in the world, but nevertheless for certain ...
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Is there a term for the absence of evidence fallacy with regard to scientific falsification?

If one looks at the roots of science, it is not founded on being right, but on being easy to prove wrong. Popper's concept of falsification puts this in words. I see many who see the absence of ...
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What does Bachelard mean by “Applied Rationalism”?

I've heard this term many times. I've tried to google it but there is a very little about it. There is no online resource which explains the term and what is this position. So my question is, What ...
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370 views

Is philosophy meaningless?

*By meaningless I mean undefined, and by meaning I mean definition. As a student of philosophy, I, like the general public, thought that my difficulty in understanding the concepts of philosophy is ...
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Finding a clear difference between truth and fact [duplicate]

I have been starting back in school after a long hiatus. In one of my classes, a discussion of Truth began. The problem I have had is that no one seems to have a solid definition between the two. ...
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Is philosophy the quest of the answer, or the thrive of the process? [closed]

I thought about "the medium is the message", and kind of transposed the similar thought-pattern to philosophy. Finding answers often seems to be at the very core of the subject: people fight with ...
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How to define a number [closed]

What is the positive real number (say less than one) that is not a rational nor an irrational number? I have encountered a mathematical problem that confused me about the definition of real ...
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The Opposite Point of Positivist Epistemology

In the philosophy of science, I wanted to know what is the exact opposite point of the positivist epistemology? Actually I'm not from the philosophy area and thus not familiar with different ...
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Do linguists call human language “natural”? [closed]

From a recent question (Could a programming language be considered as a language?), it came to me the impression that there may be some confusion about the terminology professional linguists use, when ...