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Yes, Einstein was a philosopher, as well as a scientist. My entire answerMy entire answer to Physics, Theoretical Understanding and the Limits of Human Knowledge/UnderstandingPhysics, Theoretical Understanding and the Limits of Human Knowledge/Understanding is relevant here, so I will simply list the lines of evidence:

  1. Michael Friedman in Dynamics of Reason notes the existence of the book Albert Einstein: Philosopher-scientist.
  2. Massimo Pigliucci, in his blog post Lawrence Krauss: another physicist with an anti-philosophy complex, argues for the importance of philosophy in physics, citing Lee Smolin and his The Trouble with Physics, and also quoting Einstein himself being intensely philosophical.
  3. Michael Polanyi in Personal Knowledge argues that Einstein's discovery of special relativity was a philosophical act. This is obscured by several historical fictions which Polanyi dispels with evidence.
    I want to recall how scientific theory came to be reduced in the modern mind to the rank of a convenient contrivance, a device for recording events and computing their future course, and I wish to suggest then that twentieth-century physics, and Einstein's discovery of relativity in particular, which are usually regarded as the fruits and illustrations of this positivistic conception of science, demonstrate on the contrary the power of science to make contact with reality in nature by recognizing what is rational in nature. (6)

In case the impact of 3 is not clear, I quote from William James' Pragmatism, where he describes two ways of thinking about reality:

THE TENDER-MINDED
Rationalistic (going by 'principles'), Intellectualistic, Idealistic, Optimistic, Religious, Free-willist, Monistic, Dogmatical.

THE TOUGH-MINDED
Empiricist (going by 'facts'), Sensationalistic, Materialistic, Pessimistic, Irreligious, Fatalistic, Pluralistic, Sceptical.

From this, we can see that Einstein knew the importance of being "tender-minded", which is traditionally a very philosophical stance: seeing the forest in the trees.

Yes, Einstein was a philosopher, as well as a scientist. My entire answer to Physics, Theoretical Understanding and the Limits of Human Knowledge/Understanding is relevant here, so I will simply list the lines of evidence:

  1. Michael Friedman in Dynamics of Reason notes the existence of the book Albert Einstein: Philosopher-scientist.
  2. Massimo Pigliucci, in his blog post Lawrence Krauss: another physicist with an anti-philosophy complex, argues for the importance of philosophy in physics, citing Lee Smolin and his The Trouble with Physics, and also quoting Einstein himself being intensely philosophical.
  3. Michael Polanyi in Personal Knowledge argues that Einstein's discovery of special relativity was a philosophical act. This is obscured by several historical fictions which Polanyi dispels with evidence.
    I want to recall how scientific theory came to be reduced in the modern mind to the rank of a convenient contrivance, a device for recording events and computing their future course, and I wish to suggest then that twentieth-century physics, and Einstein's discovery of relativity in particular, which are usually regarded as the fruits and illustrations of this positivistic conception of science, demonstrate on the contrary the power of science to make contact with reality in nature by recognizing what is rational in nature. (6)

In case the impact of 3 is not clear, I quote from William James' Pragmatism, where he describes two ways of thinking about reality:

THE TENDER-MINDED
Rationalistic (going by 'principles'), Intellectualistic, Idealistic, Optimistic, Religious, Free-willist, Monistic, Dogmatical.

THE TOUGH-MINDED
Empiricist (going by 'facts'), Sensationalistic, Materialistic, Pessimistic, Irreligious, Fatalistic, Pluralistic, Sceptical.

From this, we can see that Einstein knew the importance of being "tender-minded", which is traditionally a very philosophical stance: seeing the forest in the trees.

Yes, Einstein was a philosopher, as well as a scientist. My entire answer to Physics, Theoretical Understanding and the Limits of Human Knowledge/Understanding is relevant here, so I will simply list the lines of evidence:

  1. Michael Friedman in Dynamics of Reason notes the existence of the book Albert Einstein: Philosopher-scientist.
  2. Massimo Pigliucci, in his blog post Lawrence Krauss: another physicist with an anti-philosophy complex, argues for the importance of philosophy in physics, citing Lee Smolin and his The Trouble with Physics, and also quoting Einstein himself being intensely philosophical.
  3. Michael Polanyi in Personal Knowledge argues that Einstein's discovery of special relativity was a philosophical act. This is obscured by several historical fictions which Polanyi dispels with evidence.
    I want to recall how scientific theory came to be reduced in the modern mind to the rank of a convenient contrivance, a device for recording events and computing their future course, and I wish to suggest then that twentieth-century physics, and Einstein's discovery of relativity in particular, which are usually regarded as the fruits and illustrations of this positivistic conception of science, demonstrate on the contrary the power of science to make contact with reality in nature by recognizing what is rational in nature. (6)

In case the impact of 3 is not clear, I quote from William James' Pragmatism, where he describes two ways of thinking about reality:

THE TENDER-MINDED
Rationalistic (going by 'principles'), Intellectualistic, Idealistic, Optimistic, Religious, Free-willist, Monistic, Dogmatical.

THE TOUGH-MINDED
Empiricist (going by 'facts'), Sensationalistic, Materialistic, Pessimistic, Irreligious, Fatalistic, Pluralistic, Sceptical.

From this, we can see that Einstein knew the importance of being "tender-minded", which is traditionally a very philosophical stance: seeing the forest in the trees.

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Yes, Einstein was a philosopher, as well as a scientist. My entire answer to Physics, Theoretical Understanding and the Limits of Human Knowledge/Understanding is relevant here, so I will simply list the lines of evidence:

  1. Michael Friedman in Dynamics of Reason notes the existence of the book Albert Einstein: Philosopher-scientist.
  2. Massimo Pigliucci, in his blog post Lawrence Krauss: another physicist with an anti-philosophy complex, argues for the importance of philosophy in physics, citing Lee Smolin and his The Trouble with Physics, and also quoting Einstein himself being intensely philosophical.
  3. Michael Polanyi in Personal Knowledge argues that Einstein's discovery of special relativity was a philosophical act. This is obscured by several historical fictions which Polanyi dispels with evidence.
    I want to recall how scientific theory came to be reduced in the modern mind to the rank of a convenient contrivance, a device for recording events and computing their future course, and I wish to suggest then that twentieth-century physics, and Einstein's discovery of relativity in particular, which are usually regarded as the fruits and illustrations of this positivistic conception of science, demonstrate on the contrary the power of science to make contact with reality in nature by recognizing what is rational in nature. (6)

In case the impact of 3 is not clear, I quote from William James' Pragmatism, where he describes two ways of thinking about reality:

THE TENDER-MINDED
Rationalistic (going by 'principles'), Intellectualistic, Idealistic, Optimistic, Religious, Free-willist, Monistic, Dogmatical.

THE TOUGH-MINDED
Empiricist (going by 'facts'), Sensationalistic, Materialistic, Pessimistic, Irreligious, Fatalistic, Pluralistic, Sceptical.

From this, we can see that Einstein knew the importance of being "tender-minded", which is traditionally a very philosophical stance: seeing the forest in the trees.