4 Tiny typo
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I believe there is one additional point that some secular pro-life proponents would argue, namely that there is no intrinsic reason why the mother would have any absolute rights over the life (assuming premise #2) of the foetus. Even if premise #1 does not hold, the new life would have just as much right to request the maternal life to be sacrificed for it's sake as the pro-choice proponents argue that the mater has the right to abort the baby's life, thus creating the following two possible reasonings:

The first:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human wants to liveplive/is intrinsically egoistic.
  3. The wishes of both humans in question are equal, thus taking the wishes of one over the other is 'unethical'.

The second:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human has the right to make it's own choices (which in some way relies on premise #1 from the OP)
  3. A new life can not be asked to make these choices, so it should be protected till the age it can (at which point a secular view still leaves the debate open whether euthanasia/suicide is allowed).

I believe there is one additional point that some secular pro-life proponents would argue, namely that there is no intrinsic reason why the mother would have any absolute rights over the life (assuming premise #2) of the foetus. Even if premise #1 does not hold, the new life would have just as much right to request the maternal life to be sacrificed for it's sake as the pro-choice proponents argue that the mater has the right to abort the baby's life, thus creating the following two possible reasonings:

The first:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human wants to livep/is intrinsically egoistic.
  3. The wishes of both humans in question are equal, thus taking the wishes of one over the other is 'unethical'.

The second:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human has the right to make it's own choices (which in some way relies on premise #1 from the OP)
  3. A new life can not be asked to make these choices, so it should be protected till the age it can (at which point a secular view still leaves the debate open whether euthanasia/suicide is allowed).

I believe there is one additional point that some secular pro-life proponents would argue, namely that there is no intrinsic reason why the mother would have any absolute rights over the life (assuming premise #2) of the foetus. Even if premise #1 does not hold, the new life would have just as much right to request the maternal life to be sacrificed for it's sake as the pro-choice proponents argue that the mater has the right to abort the baby's life, thus creating the following two possible reasonings:

The first:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human wants to live/is intrinsically egoistic.
  3. The wishes of both humans in question are equal, thus taking the wishes of one over the other is 'unethical'.

The second:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human has the right to make it's own choices (which in some way relies on premise #1 from the OP)
  3. A new life can not be asked to make these choices, so it should be protected till the age it can (at which point a secular view still leaves the debate open whether euthanasia/suicide is allowed).
3 added 1 character in body
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I believe there is one additional point that some secular pro-life proponents would argue, namely that there is no intrinsic reason why the mother would have any absolute rights over the life (assuming premise #2) of the foetus. Even if premise #1 does not hold, the new life would have just as much right to request the maternal life to be sacrificed for it's sake as the pro-choice proponents argue that the mater has the right to abort the baby's life, thus creating the following two possible reasonings:

The first:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human wants to lifelivep/is intrinsically egoistic.
  3. The wishes of both humans in question are equal, thus taking the wishes of one over the other is 'unethical'.

The second:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human has the right to make it's own choices (which in some way relies on premise #1 from the OP)
  3. A new life can not be asked to make these choices, so it should be protected till the age it can (at which point a secular view still leaves the debate open whether euthanasia/suicide is allowed).

I believe there is one additional point that some secular pro-life proponents would argue, namely that there is no intrinsic reason why the mother would have any absolute rights over the life (assuming premise #2) of the foetus. Even if premise #1 does not hold, the new life would have just as much right to request the maternal life to be sacrificed for it's sake as the pro-choice proponents argue that the mater has the right to abort the baby's life, thus creating the following two possible reasonings:

The first:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human wants to life/is intrinsically egoistic.
  3. The wishes of both humans in question are equal, thus taking the wishes of one over the other is 'unethical'.

The second:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human has the right to make it's own choices (which in some way relies on premise #1 from the OP)
  3. A new life can not be asked to make these choices, so it should be protected till the age it can (at which point a secular view still leaves the debate open whether euthanasia/suicide is allowed).

I believe there is one additional point that some secular pro-life proponents would argue, namely that there is no intrinsic reason why the mother would have any absolute rights over the life (assuming premise #2) of the foetus. Even if premise #1 does not hold, the new life would have just as much right to request the maternal life to be sacrificed for it's sake as the pro-choice proponents argue that the mater has the right to abort the baby's life, thus creating the following two possible reasonings:

The first:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human wants to livep/is intrinsically egoistic.
  3. The wishes of both humans in question are equal, thus taking the wishes of one over the other is 'unethical'.

The second:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human has the right to make it's own choices (which in some way relies on premise #1 from the OP)
  3. A new life can not be asked to make these choices, so it should be protected till the age it can (at which point a secular view still leaves the debate open whether euthanasia/suicide is allowed).
2 added 1 character in body
source | link

I believe there is one additional point that some secular pro-life proponents would argue, namely that there is no intrinsic reason why the mother would have any absolute rights over the life (assuming premise #2) of the foetus. Even if premise #1 does not hold, the new life would have just as much liferight to request the maternal life to be sacrificed for it's sake as the pro-choice proponents argue that the mater has the right to abort the baby's life, thus creating the following two possible reasonings:

The first:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human wants to life/is intrinsically egoistic.
  3. The wishes of both humans in question are equal, thus taking the wishes of one over the other is 'unethical'.

The second:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human has the right to make it's own choices (which in some way relies on premise #1 from the OP)
  3. A new life can not be asked to make these choices, so it should be protected till the age it can (at which point a secular view still leaves the debate open whether euthanasia/suicide is allowed).

I believe there is one additional point that some secular pro-life proponents would argue, namely that there is no intrinsic reason why the mother would have any absolute rights over the life (assuming premise #2) of the foetus. Even if premise #1 does not hold, the new life would have just as much life to request the maternal life to be sacrificed for it's sake as the pro-choice proponents argue that the mater has the right to abort the baby's life, thus creating the following two possible reasonings:

The first:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human wants to life/is intrinsically egoistic.
  3. The wishes of both humans in question are equal, thus taking the wishes of one over the other is 'unethical'.

The second:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human has the right to make it's own choices (which in some way relies on premise #1 from the OP)
  3. A new life can not be asked to make these choices, so it should be protected till the age it can (at which point a secular view still leaves the debate open whether euthanasia/suicide is allowed).

I believe there is one additional point that some secular pro-life proponents would argue, namely that there is no intrinsic reason why the mother would have any absolute rights over the life (assuming premise #2) of the foetus. Even if premise #1 does not hold, the new life would have just as much right to request the maternal life to be sacrificed for it's sake as the pro-choice proponents argue that the mater has the right to abort the baby's life, thus creating the following two possible reasonings:

The first:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human wants to life/is intrinsically egoistic.
  3. The wishes of both humans in question are equal, thus taking the wishes of one over the other is 'unethical'.

The second:

  1. A human exists at the point of conception, i.e. that is when her DNA first began to exist.
  2. A human has the right to make it's own choices (which in some way relies on premise #1 from the OP)
  3. A new life can not be asked to make these choices, so it should be protected till the age it can (at which point a secular view still leaves the debate open whether euthanasia/suicide is allowed).
1
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