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Kant is famous for subordinating reality in one aspect (the phenomenal) to consciousness via his Copernican Revolution of subordinating objects to the ground of intuition. Husserl, in his theory of Phenomenology, is famous for pointing out that a marker for consciousness is Intentionality; this in fact was reintroduced into philosophy by his mentor, Bretano:

Every mental phenomenon is characterized by what the Scholastics of the Middle Ages called the intentional (or mental) inexistence of an object, and what we might call, though not wholly unambiguously, reference to a content, direction towards an object (which is not to be understood here as meaning a thing), or immanent objectivity...We could, therefore, define mental phenomena by saying that they are those phenomena which contain an object intentionally within themselves.

Bretano, Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint

Can one, by putting these two pictures together, return teleology to the world?

Kant is famous for subordinating reality in one aspect (the phenomenal) to consciousness via his Copernican Revolution of subordinating objects to the ground of intuition. Husserl, in his theory of Phenomenology, is famous for pointing out that a marker for consciousness is Intentionality; this in fact was reintroduced into philosophy by Bretano:

Every mental phenomenon is characterized by what the Scholastics of the Middle Ages called the intentional (or mental) inexistence of an object, and what we might call, though not wholly unambiguously, reference to a content, direction towards an object (which is not to be understood here as meaning a thing), or immanent objectivity...We could, therefore, define mental phenomena by saying that they are those phenomena which contain an object intentionally within themselves.

Bretano, Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint

Can one, by putting these two pictures together, return teleology to the world?

Kant is famous for subordinating reality in one aspect (the phenomenal) to consciousness via his Copernican Revolution of subordinating objects to the ground of intuition. Husserl, in his theory of Phenomenology, is famous for pointing out that a marker for consciousness is Intentionality; this in fact was reintroduced into philosophy by his mentor, Bretano:

Every mental phenomenon is characterized by what the Scholastics of the Middle Ages called the intentional (or mental) inexistence of an object, and what we might call, though not wholly unambiguously, reference to a content, direction towards an object (which is not to be understood here as meaning a thing), or immanent objectivity...We could, therefore, define mental phenomena by saying that they are those phenomena which contain an object intentionally within themselves.

Bretano, Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint

Can one, by putting these two pictures together, return teleology to the world?

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Kant & Intentionality

Kant is famous for subordinating reality in one aspect (the phenomenal) to consciousness via his Copernican Revolution of subordinating objects to the ground of intuition. Husserl, in his theory of Phenomenology, is famous for pointing out that a marker for consciousness is Intentionality; this in fact was reintroduced into philosophy by Bretano:

Every mental phenomenon is characterized by what the Scholastics of the Middle Ages called the intentional (or mental) inexistence of an object, and what we might call, though not wholly unambiguously, reference to a content, direction towards an object (which is not to be understood here as meaning a thing), or immanent objectivity...We could, therefore, define mental phenomena by saying that they are those phenomena which contain an object intentionally within themselves.

Bretano, Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint

Can one, by putting these two pictures together, return teleology to the world?