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I'm have a question that I don't think is on topic over on Christianity.SEChristianity.SE even though it is the exchanges in chat there constantly raise the issue. This is a kind of thought experiment.

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -- Aristotle

Without judging whether the premise is true, I would like to know what logic and Philosophy alone would deduce as a rational world view if the nature of man was inherently evil or corrupt. The premise is that neither man's will nor his consciousness can be trusted to be either good or pure.

Obvious this comes up mostly in the context of the subset of Christianity that believes in total depravity, but I'd like to hear answers that do not cite Biblical references or reason from Scripture. Stripped of the framework where this view is usually fitted, what are the logical consequences of such a system? Where do they lead? What results would we expect to find?

I'm have a question that I don't think is on topic over on Christianity.SE even though it is the exchanges in chat there constantly raise the issue. This is a kind of thought experiment.

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -- Aristotle

Without judging whether the premise is true, I would like to know what logic and Philosophy alone would deduce as a rational world view if the nature of man was inherently evil or corrupt. The premise is that neither man's will nor his consciousness can be trusted to be either good or pure.

Obvious this comes up mostly in the context of the subset of Christianity that believes in total depravity, but I'd like to hear answers that do not cite Biblical references or reason from Scripture. Stripped of the framework where this view is usually fitted, what are the logical consequences of such a system? Where do they lead? What results would we expect to find?

I'm have a question that I don't think is on topic over on Christianity.SE even though it is the exchanges in chat there constantly raise the issue. This is a kind of thought experiment.

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -- Aristotle

Without judging whether the premise is true, I would like to know what logic and Philosophy alone would deduce as a rational world view if the nature of man was inherently evil or corrupt. The premise is that neither man's will nor his consciousness can be trusted to be either good or pure.

Obvious this comes up mostly in the context of the subset of Christianity that believes in total depravity, but I'd like to hear answers that do not cite Biblical references or reason from Scripture. Stripped of the framework where this view is usually fitted, what are the logical consequences of such a system? Where do they lead? What results would we expect to find?

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I'm have a question that I don't think is on topic over on Christianity.SE even though it is the exchanges in chat there constantly raise the issue. This is a kind of thought experiment.

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -- Aristotle

Without judging whether the premise is true, I would like to know what logic and Philosophy alone would deduce as a rational world view if the nature of man was inherently evil or corrupt. The premise is that neither man's will nor his consciousness can be trusted to be either good or pure.

Obvious this comes up mostly in the context of the subset of Christianity that believes in total depravity, but I'd like to hear answers that do not cite Biblical references or reason from Scripture. Stripped of the framework where this view is usually fitted, what are the logical consequences of such a system.? Where do they lead? What results would we expect to find?

I'm have a question that I don't think is on topic over on Christianity.SE even though it is the exchanges in chat there constantly raise the issue. This is a kind of thought experiment.

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -- Aristotle

Without judging whether the premise is true, I would like to know what logic and Philosophy alone would deduce as a rational world view if the nature of man was inherently evil or corrupt. The premise is that neither man's will nor his consciousness can be trusted to be either good or pure.

Obvious this comes up mostly in the context of the subset of Christianity that believes in total depravity, but I'd like to hear answers that do not cite Biblical references or reason from Scripture. Stripped of the framework where this view is usually fitted, what are the logical consequences of such a system. Where do they lead? What results would we expect to find?

I'm have a question that I don't think is on topic over on Christianity.SE even though it is the exchanges in chat there constantly raise the issue. This is a kind of thought experiment.

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -- Aristotle

Without judging whether the premise is true, I would like to know what logic and Philosophy alone would deduce as a rational world view if the nature of man was inherently evil or corrupt. The premise is that neither man's will nor his consciousness can be trusted to be either good or pure.

Obvious this comes up mostly in the context of the subset of Christianity that believes in total depravity, but I'd like to hear answers that do not cite Biblical references or reason from Scripture. Stripped of the framework where this view is usually fitted, what are the logical consequences of such a system? Where do they lead? What results would we expect to find?

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What would be the logical consequences of human will/nature being corrupt?

I'm have a question that I don't think is on topic over on Christianity.SE even though it is the exchanges in chat there constantly raise the issue. This is a kind of thought experiment.

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -- Aristotle

Without judging whether the premise is true, I would like to know what logic and Philosophy alone would deduce as a rational world view if the nature of man was inherently evil or corrupt. The premise is that neither man's will nor his consciousness can be trusted to be either good or pure.

Obvious this comes up mostly in the context of the subset of Christianity that believes in total depravity, but I'd like to hear answers that do not cite Biblical references or reason from Scripture. Stripped of the framework where this view is usually fitted, what are the logical consequences of such a system. Where do they lead? What results would we expect to find?