3 no call for such llanguage
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This question has been asked and answered by so many different minds, and in so many different ways, that the only remaining issue of importance is how you intend to interpret the question and answer.

First off:

It is impossible to prove that reality exists.

It is impossible because, your ability to prove reality hinges on the existence of reality - and hinges on the existence of a reality that includes you - and includes you as a being capable of correctly interpreting the measurements and logic required to "prove" reality. If you were completely assured of your ability to correctly interpret your measurements and proofs of reality, it would be absurd to try and prove reality exists.

If you could somehow acquire 100% certainty that you were not deceiving yourself with your logic and with your tests, then you would not need to prove anything. You would already be 100% certain. Without 100% certainty, there is always the chance that there is something you are measuring wrong; or maybe you're just a brain in a vat somewhere.

And 100% certainty is impossible. I won't go into Plato's allegory of the cave (he used it for other purposes as well), but if you imagine you spent your whole life inside a cave never catching a glimpse of the sun, then you could prove a great many things that would instantly become horsesh*tnonsense the first time you saw the sun and realized your measurements were based upon (at best) incomplete data.

There are many thought experiments which cover this ground and suffice to say it is not possible to get anywhere close to producing something which resembles a proof that reality exists.

Now here's the next part of the question. What do you want to use this for? Depending on the context of the question, there are a great many pathways to increase understanding and intelligence.

Consider it this way: What do you mean when you say, "Does reality exist?"

Do you mean?

  • "Does what I observe with my eyes correspond with what is actually there?"
  • "What is the isness that I label 'reality' and in what manner can I understand this isness?"
  • "Do I have permanence?"
  • "Does anything have permance?"
  • "Is what I label reality a thing that can be qualified?"

These questions are unending. I think a far more reasonable challenge would be to try and come up with a new way to ask the question. The answers are in no short supply; and everyone "knows" that there answer is the right one. What would be far more interesting I think, is to come up with such a way to ask the question as to illuminate a new sliver of reality; to have the question itself be a work of art and a pathway to enlighten the mind.

Let's go do that.

Note: On rereading my answer, I realized that it may have come across as dismissive. That is not my intention. I love questions like that of the OP, because they stimulate the thinking required to respond.

This question has been asked and answered by so many different minds, and in so many different ways, that the only remaining issue of importance is how you intend to interpret the question and answer.

First off:

It is impossible to prove that reality exists.

It is impossible because, your ability to prove reality hinges on the existence of reality - and hinges on the existence of a reality that includes you - and includes you as a being capable of correctly interpreting the measurements and logic required to "prove" reality. If you were completely assured of your ability to correctly interpret your measurements and proofs of reality, it would be absurd to try and prove reality exists.

If you could somehow acquire 100% certainty that you were not deceiving yourself with your logic and with your tests, then you would not need to prove anything. You would already be 100% certain. Without 100% certainty, there is always the chance that there is something you are measuring wrong; or maybe you're just a brain in a vat somewhere.

And 100% certainty is impossible. I won't go into Plato's allegory of the cave (he used it for other purposes as well), but if you imagine you spent your whole life inside a cave never catching a glimpse of the sun, then you could prove a great many things that would instantly become horsesh*t the first time you saw the sun and realized your measurements were based upon (at best) incomplete data.

There are many thought experiments which cover this ground and suffice to say it is not possible to get anywhere close to producing something which resembles a proof that reality exists.

Now here's the next part of the question. What do you want to use this for? Depending on the context of the question, there are a great many pathways to increase understanding and intelligence.

Consider it this way: What do you mean when you say, "Does reality exist?"

Do you mean?

  • "Does what I observe with my eyes correspond with what is actually there?"
  • "What is the isness that I label 'reality' and in what manner can I understand this isness?"
  • "Do I have permanence?"
  • "Does anything have permance?"
  • "Is what I label reality a thing that can be qualified?"

These questions are unending. I think a far more reasonable challenge would be to try and come up with a new way to ask the question. The answers are in no short supply; and everyone "knows" that there answer is the right one. What would be far more interesting I think, is to come up with such a way to ask the question as to illuminate a new sliver of reality; to have the question itself be a work of art and a pathway to enlighten the mind.

Let's go do that.

Note: On rereading my answer, I realized that it may have come across as dismissive. That is not my intention. I love questions like that of the OP, because they stimulate the thinking required to respond.

This question has been asked and answered by so many different minds, and in so many different ways, that the only remaining issue of importance is how you intend to interpret the question and answer.

First off:

It is impossible to prove that reality exists.

It is impossible because, your ability to prove reality hinges on the existence of reality - and hinges on the existence of a reality that includes you - and includes you as a being capable of correctly interpreting the measurements and logic required to "prove" reality. If you were completely assured of your ability to correctly interpret your measurements and proofs of reality, it would be absurd to try and prove reality exists.

If you could somehow acquire 100% certainty that you were not deceiving yourself with your logic and with your tests, then you would not need to prove anything. You would already be 100% certain. Without 100% certainty, there is always the chance that there is something you are measuring wrong; or maybe you're just a brain in a vat somewhere.

And 100% certainty is impossible. I won't go into Plato's allegory of the cave (he used it for other purposes as well), but if you imagine you spent your whole life inside a cave never catching a glimpse of the sun, then you could prove a great many things that would instantly become nonsense the first time you saw the sun and realized your measurements were based upon (at best) incomplete data.

There are many thought experiments which cover this ground and suffice to say it is not possible to get anywhere close to producing something which resembles a proof that reality exists.

Now here's the next part of the question. What do you want to use this for? Depending on the context of the question, there are a great many pathways to increase understanding and intelligence.

Consider it this way: What do you mean when you say, "Does reality exist?"

Do you mean?

  • "Does what I observe with my eyes correspond with what is actually there?"
  • "What is the isness that I label 'reality' and in what manner can I understand this isness?"
  • "Do I have permanence?"
  • "Does anything have permance?"
  • "Is what I label reality a thing that can be qualified?"

These questions are unending. I think a far more reasonable challenge would be to try and come up with a new way to ask the question. The answers are in no short supply; and everyone "knows" that there answer is the right one. What would be far more interesting I think, is to come up with such a way to ask the question as to illuminate a new sliver of reality; to have the question itself be a work of art and a pathway to enlighten the mind.

Let's go do that.

Note: On rereading my answer, I realized that it may have come across as dismissive. That is not my intention. I love questions like that of the OP, because they stimulate the thinking required to respond.

2 added 216 characters in body
source | link

This question has been asked and answered by so many different minds, and in so many different ways, that the only remaining issue of importance is how you intend to interpret the question and answer.

First off:

It is impossible to prove that reality exists.

It is impossible because, your ability to prove reality hinges on the existence of reality - and hinges on the existence of a reality that includes you - and includes you as a being capable of correctly interpreting the measurements and logic required to "prove" reality. If you were completely assured of your ability to correctly interpret your measurements and proofs of reality, it would be absurd to try and prove reality exists.

If you could somehow acquire 100% certainty that you were not deceiving yourself with your logic and with your tests, then you would not need to prove anything. You would already be 100% certain. Without 100% certainty, there is always the chance that there is something you are measuring wrong; or maybe you're just a brain in a vat somewhere.

And 100% certainty is impossible. I won't go into Plato's allegory of the cave (he used it for other purposes as well), but if you imagine you spent your whole life inside a cave never catching a glimpse of the sun, then you could prove a great many things that would instantly become horsesh*t the first time you saw the sun and realized your measurements were based upon (at best) incomplete data.

There are many thought experiments which cover this ground and suffice to say it is not possible to get anywhere close to producing something which resembles a proof that reality exists.

Now here's the next part of the question. What do you want to use this for? Depending on the context of the question, there are a great many pathways to increase understanding and intelligence.

Consider it this way: What do you mean when you say, "Does reality exist?"

Do you mean?

  • "Does what I observe with my eyes correspond with what is actually there?"
  • "What is the isness that I label 'reality' and in what manner can I understand this isness?"
  • "Do I have permanence?"
  • "Does anything have permance?"
  • "Is what I label reality a thing that can be qualified?"

These questions are unending. I think a far more reasonable challenge would be to try and come up with a new way to ask the question. The answers are in no short supply; and everyone "knows" that there answer is the right one. What would be far more interesting I think, is to come up with such a way to ask the question as to illuminate a new sliver of reality; to have the question itself be a work of art and a pathway to enlighten the mind.

Let's go do that.

Note: On rereading my answer, I realized that it may have come across as dismissive. That is not my intention. I love questions like that of the OP, because they stimulate the thinking required to respond.

This question has been asked and answered by so many different minds, and in so many different ways, that the only remaining issue of importance is how you intend to interpret the question and answer.

First off:

It is impossible to prove that reality exists.

It is impossible because, your ability to prove reality hinges on the existence of reality - and hinges on the existence of a reality that includes you - and includes you as a being capable of correctly interpreting the measurements and logic required to "prove" reality. If you were completely assured of your ability to correctly interpret your measurements and proofs of reality, it would be absurd to try and prove reality exists.

If you could somehow acquire 100% certainty that you were not deceiving yourself with your logic and with your tests, then you would not need to prove anything. You would already be 100% certain. Without 100% certainty, there is always the chance that there is something you are measuring wrong; or maybe you're just a brain in a vat somewhere.

And 100% certainty is impossible. I won't go into Plato's allegory of the cave (he used it for other purposes as well), but if you imagine you spent your whole life inside a cave never catching a glimpse of the sun, then you could prove a great many things that would instantly become horsesh*t the first time you saw the sun and realized your measurements were based upon (at best) incomplete data.

There are many thought experiments which cover this ground and suffice to say it is not possible to get anywhere close to producing something which resembles a proof that reality exists.

Now here's the next part of the question. What do you want to use this for? Depending on the context of the question, there are a great many pathways to increase understanding and intelligence.

Consider it this way: What do you mean when you say, "Does reality exist?"

Do you mean?

  • "Does what I observe with my eyes correspond with what is actually there?"
  • "What is the isness that I label 'reality' and in what manner can I understand this isness?"
  • "Do I have permanence?"
  • "Does anything have permance?"
  • "Is what I label reality a thing that can be qualified?"

These questions are unending. I think a far more reasonable challenge would be to try and come up with a new way to ask the question. The answers are in no short supply; and everyone "knows" that there answer is the right one. What would be far more interesting I think, is to come up with such a way to ask the question as to illuminate a new sliver of reality; to have the question itself be a work of art and a pathway to enlighten the mind.

Let's go do that.

This question has been asked and answered by so many different minds, and in so many different ways, that the only remaining issue of importance is how you intend to interpret the question and answer.

First off:

It is impossible to prove that reality exists.

It is impossible because, your ability to prove reality hinges on the existence of reality - and hinges on the existence of a reality that includes you - and includes you as a being capable of correctly interpreting the measurements and logic required to "prove" reality. If you were completely assured of your ability to correctly interpret your measurements and proofs of reality, it would be absurd to try and prove reality exists.

If you could somehow acquire 100% certainty that you were not deceiving yourself with your logic and with your tests, then you would not need to prove anything. You would already be 100% certain. Without 100% certainty, there is always the chance that there is something you are measuring wrong; or maybe you're just a brain in a vat somewhere.

And 100% certainty is impossible. I won't go into Plato's allegory of the cave (he used it for other purposes as well), but if you imagine you spent your whole life inside a cave never catching a glimpse of the sun, then you could prove a great many things that would instantly become horsesh*t the first time you saw the sun and realized your measurements were based upon (at best) incomplete data.

There are many thought experiments which cover this ground and suffice to say it is not possible to get anywhere close to producing something which resembles a proof that reality exists.

Now here's the next part of the question. What do you want to use this for? Depending on the context of the question, there are a great many pathways to increase understanding and intelligence.

Consider it this way: What do you mean when you say, "Does reality exist?"

Do you mean?

  • "Does what I observe with my eyes correspond with what is actually there?"
  • "What is the isness that I label 'reality' and in what manner can I understand this isness?"
  • "Do I have permanence?"
  • "Does anything have permance?"
  • "Is what I label reality a thing that can be qualified?"

These questions are unending. I think a far more reasonable challenge would be to try and come up with a new way to ask the question. The answers are in no short supply; and everyone "knows" that there answer is the right one. What would be far more interesting I think, is to come up with such a way to ask the question as to illuminate a new sliver of reality; to have the question itself be a work of art and a pathway to enlighten the mind.

Let's go do that.

Note: On rereading my answer, I realized that it may have come across as dismissive. That is not my intention. I love questions like that of the OP, because they stimulate the thinking required to respond.

1
source | link

This question has been asked and answered by so many different minds, and in so many different ways, that the only remaining issue of importance is how you intend to interpret the question and answer.

First off:

It is impossible to prove that reality exists.

It is impossible because, your ability to prove reality hinges on the existence of reality - and hinges on the existence of a reality that includes you - and includes you as a being capable of correctly interpreting the measurements and logic required to "prove" reality. If you were completely assured of your ability to correctly interpret your measurements and proofs of reality, it would be absurd to try and prove reality exists.

If you could somehow acquire 100% certainty that you were not deceiving yourself with your logic and with your tests, then you would not need to prove anything. You would already be 100% certain. Without 100% certainty, there is always the chance that there is something you are measuring wrong; or maybe you're just a brain in a vat somewhere.

And 100% certainty is impossible. I won't go into Plato's allegory of the cave (he used it for other purposes as well), but if you imagine you spent your whole life inside a cave never catching a glimpse of the sun, then you could prove a great many things that would instantly become horsesh*t the first time you saw the sun and realized your measurements were based upon (at best) incomplete data.

There are many thought experiments which cover this ground and suffice to say it is not possible to get anywhere close to producing something which resembles a proof that reality exists.

Now here's the next part of the question. What do you want to use this for? Depending on the context of the question, there are a great many pathways to increase understanding and intelligence.

Consider it this way: What do you mean when you say, "Does reality exist?"

Do you mean?

  • "Does what I observe with my eyes correspond with what is actually there?"
  • "What is the isness that I label 'reality' and in what manner can I understand this isness?"
  • "Do I have permanence?"
  • "Does anything have permance?"
  • "Is what I label reality a thing that can be qualified?"

These questions are unending. I think a far more reasonable challenge would be to try and come up with a new way to ask the question. The answers are in no short supply; and everyone "knows" that there answer is the right one. What would be far more interesting I think, is to come up with such a way to ask the question as to illuminate a new sliver of reality; to have the question itself be a work of art and a pathway to enlighten the mind.

Let's go do that.