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What is a good question? First, let's concede that great questions are precisely new, unforeseen, unpredictable -- blind spots, or 'grey' areas of irreflexivity, from the perspective of the dominant episteme.

So in this sense a great question 'expresses' the gaps in our existing explanations of the world, occupying 'plot holes' in our stories and theories.

Deleuze suggests that a great thinker effectively lives their whole life within the boundaries of a single, great Question -- not that they exemplify solutions, but that their very thinking and existence are in some sense dramatizations or 'actualizations' of the Question itself.

One way to understand this is to recognize that a great question is critical -- deflating some lofty idea of its hot air, 'cutting' to the core of a theoretical problem. To put it plainly, a philosophical questionphilosophy that annoys or saddens no one isn't really one at all.

A great question, then, intoxicates us with alternative 'landscapes' or arrangements, and it also sobers us in preparation for the experimental creation of new concepts.

It bears repeating that question or problem understood in this way is like a new concept -- unforeseeable in its precise contours, 'unarticulable' from the perspective of the majoritarian discourse. Nevertheless we can say that a good question impels us to both imagine another way of seeing the world, as well as to the active creation of new concepts. Another feature may perhaps be identified in the uncanniness of really 'good' questions: that they formulate in a concise way certain irreconciliable inconsistencies, and demand critical (even perhaps radical) transformations.

What is a good question? First, let's concede that great questions are precisely new, unforeseen, unpredictable -- blind spots, or 'grey' areas of irreflexivity, from the perspective of the dominant episteme.

So in this sense a great question 'expresses' the gaps in our existing explanations of the world, occupying 'plot holes' in our stories and theories.

Deleuze suggests that a great thinker effectively lives their whole life within the boundaries of a single, great Question -- not that they exemplify solutions, but that their very thinking and existence are in some sense dramatizations or 'actualizations' of the Question itself.

One way to understand this is to recognize that a great question is critical -- deflating some lofty idea of its hot air, 'cutting' to the core of a theoretical problem. To put it plainly, a philosophical question that annoys or saddens no one isn't really one at all.

A great question, then, intoxicates us with alternative 'landscapes' or arrangements, and it also sobers us in preparation for the experimental creation of new concepts.

It bears repeating that question or problem understood in this way is like a new concept -- unforeseeable in its precise contours, 'unarticulable' from the perspective of the majoritarian discourse. Nevertheless we can say that a good question impels us to both imagine another way of seeing the world, as well as to the active creation of new concepts. Another feature may perhaps be identified in the uncanniness of really 'good' questions: that they formulate in a concise way certain irreconciliable inconsistencies, and demand critical (even perhaps radical) transformations.

What is a good question? First, let's concede that great questions are precisely new, unforeseen, unpredictable -- blind spots, or 'grey' areas of irreflexivity, from the perspective of the dominant episteme.

So in this sense a great question 'expresses' the gaps in our existing explanations of the world, occupying 'plot holes' in our stories and theories.

Deleuze suggests that a great thinker effectively lives their whole life within the boundaries of a single, great Question -- not that they exemplify solutions, but that their very thinking and existence are in some sense dramatizations or 'actualizations' of the Question itself.

One way to understand this is to recognize that a great question is critical -- deflating some lofty idea of its hot air, 'cutting' to the core of a theoretical problem. To put it plainly, a philosophy that annoys or saddens no one isn't really one at all.

A great question, then, intoxicates us with alternative 'landscapes' or arrangements, and it also sobers us in preparation for the experimental creation of new concepts.

It bears repeating that question or problem understood in this way is like a new concept -- unforeseeable in its precise contours, 'unarticulable' from the perspective of the majoritarian discourse. Nevertheless we can say that a good question impels us to both imagine another way of seeing the world, as well as to the active creation of new concepts. Another feature may perhaps be identified in the uncanniness of really 'good' questions: that they formulate in a concise way certain irreconciliable inconsistencies, and demand critical (even perhaps radical) transformations.

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What is a good question? First, let's concede that great questions are precisely new, unforeseen, unpredictable -- blind spots, or 'grey' areas of irreflexivity, from the perspective of the dominant episteme.

So in this sense a great question 'expresses' the gaps in our existing explanations of the world, occupying 'plot holes' in our stories and theories.

Deleuze suggests that a great thinker effectively lives their whole life within the boundaries of a single, great Question -- not that they exemplify solutions, but that their very thinking and existence are in some sense dramatizations or 'actualizations' of the Question itself.

One way to understand this is to recognize that a great question is critical -- deflating some lofty idea of its hot air, 'cutting' to the core of a theoretical problem. To put it plainly, a philosophical question that annoys or saddens no one isn't really one at all.

A great question, then, intoxicates us with alternative 'landscapes' or arrangements, and it also sobers us in preparation for the experimental creation of new concepts.

It bears repeating that question or problem understood in this way is like a new concept -- unforeseeable in its precise contours, 'unarticulable' from the perspective of the majoritarian discourse. Nevertheless we can say that a good question impels us to both imagine another way of seeing the world, as well as to the active creation of new concepts. Another feature may perhaps be identified in the uncanniness of really 'good' questions: that they formulate in a concise way certain irreconciliable inconsistencies, and demand critical (even perhaps radical) transformations.