3 fixed typos
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dimension of comparison = something you can compare things about. i.e., consider two dogs: a toy poodle and a doberman pinscher.

You can compare them in terms of size in which case size is the dimension of comparison. You can compare then in terms of weight in which case weight is the dimension of comparison.

This is not a term of art in philosophy. This is just what the English words mean.


Regarding the philosophical part, I would strongly recommend against using Dawkins to understand anything in the history of philosophy. He's not knowledgeable about philosophy.

I haven't bothered looking at the link, but Dawkins' understanding on this point is clearly vacuous. Aquinas's choice of goodness is not arbitrary and cannot be replaced by say morbidity or fatness or smelliness. The simple reason is that for Aquinas goodness is a type of transcendental in a way these others things are not. Moreover, it's a transcendental we don't possess to the utmost, so it's somewhat mysterious to him that we think of it.

There may be legitimate questions about this whole idea of transcendentals but all Dawkins does with his writeup as you've quoted him is demonstrate that he doesn't bother trying to understand what he reads.


For those not in philosophy or analytics who don't know any history, the term transcendental might be unfamiliar as would the reason why such a category would exist.

Historically speaking, both Plato and Aristotle articulate the same set of transcendentals (the good, the true, and the beautiful). For them, these are (to use contemporary language) special types of predicates. Their specific reasons for identifying the three are probably best understood through the true. Looking at it from the true, you need to keep in mind that Aristotle and Plato both believe in essences/forms and that for both specific things implement these essences/forms to a limited degree. (For Aristotle, the essence is in the object and perceived; for Plato, the Form is elsewhere and the thing is an inadequate copy). The true then is the degree to which it emulates the perfect version of itself. For Plato, at least at some points in philosophy, the perfect forms of everything exist. These thinkers also take objective views of the beautiful and the good, which unify the concepts.

Even if you're thinking, thisthe above para sounds dumb, you likely believe in at least one transcendental: existence. Most contemporary thinkers and people think existence is a different type of predicate than say red. There's aThere are big differences between a red house vs. a blue house and a red house vs. no house. The concept of existence in the way we think about it was an idea that grew up in the middle ages.

As far as I can tell from the quote, Dawkins knows none of this and raises an ignorant critique.

dimension of comparison = something you can compare things about. i.e., consider two dogs: a toy poodle and a doberman pinscher.

You can compare them in terms of size in which case size is the dimension of comparison. You can compare then in terms of weight in which case weight is the dimension of comparison.

This is not a term of art in philosophy. This is just what the English words mean.


Regarding the philosophical part, I would strongly recommend against using Dawkins to understand anything in the history of philosophy. He's not knowledgeable about philosophy.

I haven't bothered looking at the link, but Dawkins' understanding on this point is clearly vacuous. Aquinas's choice of goodness is not arbitrary and cannot be replaced by say morbidity or fatness or smelliness. The simple reason is that for Aquinas goodness is a type of transcendental in a way these others things are not. Moreover, it's a transcendental we don't possess to the utmost, so it's somewhat mysterious to him that we think of it.

There may be legitimate questions about this whole idea of transcendentals but all Dawkins does with his writeup as you've quoted him is demonstrate that he doesn't bother trying to understand what he reads.


For those not in philosophy or analytics who don't know any history, the term transcendental might be unfamiliar as would the reason why such a category would exist.

Historically speaking, both Plato and Aristotle articulate the same set of transcendentals (the good, the true, and the beautiful). For them, these are (to use contemporary language) special types of predicates. Their specific reasons for identifying the three are probably best understood through the true. Looking at it from the true, you need to keep in mind that Aristotle and Plato both believe in essences/forms and that for both specific things implement these essences/forms to a limited degree. (For Aristotle, the essence is in the object and perceived; for Plato, the Form is elsewhere and the thing is an inadequate copy). The true then is the degree to which it emulates the perfect version of itself. For Plato, at least at some points in philosophy, the perfect forms of everything exist. These thinkers also take objective views of the beautiful and the good, which unify the concepts.

Even if you're thinking, this sounds dumb, you likely believe in at least one transcendental: existence. Most contemporary thinkers and people think existence is a different type of predicate than say red. There's a big differences between a red house vs. a blue house and a red house vs. no house. The concept of existence in the way we think about it was an idea that grew up in the middle ages.

As far as I can tell from the quote, Dawkins knows none of this and raises an ignorant critique.

dimension of comparison = something you can compare things about. i.e., consider two dogs: a toy poodle and a doberman pinscher.

You can compare them in terms of size in which case size is the dimension of comparison. You can compare then in terms of weight in which case weight is the dimension of comparison.

This is not a term of art in philosophy. This is just what the English words mean.


Regarding the philosophical part, I would strongly recommend against using Dawkins to understand anything in the history of philosophy. He's not knowledgeable about philosophy.

I haven't bothered looking at the link, but Dawkins' understanding on this point is clearly vacuous. Aquinas's choice of goodness is not arbitrary and cannot be replaced by say morbidity or fatness or smelliness. The simple reason is that for Aquinas goodness is a type of transcendental in a way these others things are not. Moreover, it's a transcendental we don't possess to the utmost, so it's somewhat mysterious to him that we think of it.

There may be legitimate questions about this whole idea of transcendentals but all Dawkins does with his writeup as you've quoted him is demonstrate that he doesn't bother trying to understand what he reads.


For those not in philosophy or analytics who don't know any history, the term transcendental might be unfamiliar as would the reason why such a category would exist.

Historically speaking, both Plato and Aristotle articulate the same set of transcendentals (the good, the true, and the beautiful). For them, these are (to use contemporary language) special types of predicates. Their specific reasons for identifying the three are probably best understood through the true. Looking at it from the true, you need to keep in mind that Aristotle and Plato both believe in essences/forms and that for both specific things implement these essences/forms to a limited degree. (For Aristotle, the essence is in the object and perceived; for Plato, the Form is elsewhere and the thing is an inadequate copy). The true then is the degree to which it emulates the perfect version of itself. For Plato, at least at some points in philosophy, the perfect forms of everything exist. These thinkers also take objective views of the beautiful and the good, which unify the concepts.

Even if you're thinking, the above para sounds dumb, you likely believe in at least one transcendental: existence. Most contemporary thinkers and people think existence is a different type of predicate than say red. There are big differences between a red house vs. a blue house and a red house vs. no house. The concept of existence in the way we think about it was an idea that grew up in the middle ages.

As far as I can tell from the quote, Dawkins knows none of this and raises an ignorant critique.

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dimension of comparison = something you can compare things about. i.e., consider two dogs: a toy poodle and a doberman pinscher.

You can compare them in terms of size in which case size is the dimension of comparison. You can compare then in terms of weight in which case weight is the dimension of comparison.

This is not a term of art in philosophy. This is just what the English words mean.


Regarding the philosophical part, I would strongly recommend against using Dawkins to understand anything in the history of philosophy. He's not knowledgeable about philosophy.

I haven't bothered looking at the link, but Dawkins' understanding on this point is clearly vacuous. Aquinas's choice of goodness is not arbitrary and cannot be replaced by say morbidity or fatness or smelliness. The simple reason is that for Aquinas goodness is a type of transcendental in a way these others things are not. Moreover, it's a transcendental we don't possess to the utmost, so it's somewhat mysterious to him that we think of it.

There may be legitimate questions about this whole idea of transcendentals but all Dawkins does with his writeup as you've quoted him is demonstrate that he doesn't bother trying to understand what he reads.


For those not in philosophy or analytics who don't know any history, the term transcendental might be unfamiliar as would the reason why such a category would exist.

Historically speaking, both Plato and Aristotle articulate the same set of transcendentals (the good, the true, and the beautiful). For them, these are (to use contemporary language) special types of predicates. Their specific reasons for identifying the three are probably best understood through the true. Looking at it from the true, you need to keep in mind that Aristotle and Plato both believe in essences/forms and that for both specific things implement these essences/forms to a limited degree. (For Aristotle, the essence is in the object and perceived; for Plato, the Form is elsewhere and the thing is an inadequate copy). The true then is the degree to which it emulates the perfect version of itself. For Plato, at least at some points in philosophy, the perfect forms of everything exist. These thinkers also take objective views of the beautiful and the good, which unify the concepts.

Even if you're thinking, this sounds dumb, you likely believe in at least one transcendental: existence. Most contemporary thinkers and people think existence is a different type of predicate than say red. There's a big differences between a red house vs. a blue house and a red house vs. no house. The concept of existence in the way we think about it was an idea that grew up in the middle ages.

As far as I can tell from the quote, Dawkins knows none of this and raises an ignorant critique.

dimension of comparison = something you can compare things about. i.e., consider two dogs: a toy poodle and a doberman pinscher.

You can compare them in terms of size in which case size is the dimension of comparison. You can compare then in terms of weight in which case weight is the dimension of comparison.

This is not a term of art in philosophy. This is just what the English words mean.


Regarding the philosophical part, I would strongly recommend against using Dawkins to understand anything in the history of philosophy. He's not knowledgeable about philosophy.

I haven't bothered looking at the link, but Dawkins' understanding on this point is clearly vacuous. Aquinas's choice of goodness is not arbitrary and cannot be replaced by say morbidity or fatness or smelliness. The simple reason is that for Aquinas goodness is a type of transcendental in a way these others things are not. Moreover, it's a transcendental we don't possess to the utmost, so it's somewhat mysterious to him that we think of it.

There may be legitimate questions about this whole idea of transcendentals but all Dawkins does with his writeup as you've quoted him is demonstrate that he doesn't bother trying to understand what he reads.

dimension of comparison = something you can compare things about. i.e., consider two dogs: a toy poodle and a doberman pinscher.

You can compare them in terms of size in which case size is the dimension of comparison. You can compare then in terms of weight in which case weight is the dimension of comparison.

This is not a term of art in philosophy. This is just what the English words mean.


Regarding the philosophical part, I would strongly recommend against using Dawkins to understand anything in the history of philosophy. He's not knowledgeable about philosophy.

I haven't bothered looking at the link, but Dawkins' understanding on this point is clearly vacuous. Aquinas's choice of goodness is not arbitrary and cannot be replaced by say morbidity or fatness or smelliness. The simple reason is that for Aquinas goodness is a type of transcendental in a way these others things are not. Moreover, it's a transcendental we don't possess to the utmost, so it's somewhat mysterious to him that we think of it.

There may be legitimate questions about this whole idea of transcendentals but all Dawkins does with his writeup as you've quoted him is demonstrate that he doesn't bother trying to understand what he reads.


For those not in philosophy or analytics who don't know any history, the term transcendental might be unfamiliar as would the reason why such a category would exist.

Historically speaking, both Plato and Aristotle articulate the same set of transcendentals (the good, the true, and the beautiful). For them, these are (to use contemporary language) special types of predicates. Their specific reasons for identifying the three are probably best understood through the true. Looking at it from the true, you need to keep in mind that Aristotle and Plato both believe in essences/forms and that for both specific things implement these essences/forms to a limited degree. (For Aristotle, the essence is in the object and perceived; for Plato, the Form is elsewhere and the thing is an inadequate copy). The true then is the degree to which it emulates the perfect version of itself. For Plato, at least at some points in philosophy, the perfect forms of everything exist. These thinkers also take objective views of the beautiful and the good, which unify the concepts.

Even if you're thinking, this sounds dumb, you likely believe in at least one transcendental: existence. Most contemporary thinkers and people think existence is a different type of predicate than say red. There's a big differences between a red house vs. a blue house and a red house vs. no house. The concept of existence in the way we think about it was an idea that grew up in the middle ages.

As far as I can tell from the quote, Dawkins knows none of this and raises an ignorant critique.

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source | link

dimension of comparison = something you can compare things about. i.e., consider two dogs: a toy poodle and a doberman pinscher.

You can compare them in terms of size in which case size is the dimension of comparison. You can compare then in terms of weight in which case weight is the dimension of comparison.

This is not a term of art in philosophy. This is just what the English words mean.


Regarding the philosophical part, I would strongly recommend against using Dawkins to understand anything in the history of philosophy. He's not knowledgeable about philosophy.

I haven't bothered looking at the link, but Dawkins' understanding on this point is clearly vacuous. Aquinas's choice of goodness is not arbitrary and cannot be replaced by say morbidity or fatness or smelliness. The simple reason is that for Aquinas goodness is a type of transcendental in a way these others things are not. Moreover, it's a transcendental we don't possess to the utmost, so it's somewhat mysterious to him that we think of it.

There may be legitimate questions about this whole idea of transcendentals but all Dawkins does with his writeup as you've quoted him is demonstrate that he doesn't bother trying to understand what he reads.