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Judging Dawkins' argument solely by the quotation above, I would say that Dawkins response is a form of "argument by satire" which is a type of fallacy.

Furthermore, the argument is truncated (whether the truncation is by Dawkins or by OP, I cannot say). The argument could go on to say "we define the maximum amount of smelliness as 'Oscar the Grouch'". Then again, Dawkins, being British, may not be familiar with Oscar.

Some flaws with Aquinas's argument are (these flaws are not explicitly stated by Dawkins in the above quote):

  1. Sentence three "But we judge these degrees only by comparison with a maximum." is utterly false. Tallness, for example, is a comparison which is entirely relative, and is not compared to some sort of maximum. There are many comparisons that are not in reference to some theoreical maximum. Given that this premise is wrong, the argument can only stand if one then justifies that "goodness" is measured relative to a maximum. Such a justification is not included in Aquinas's "proof".

  2. The argument presumes that goodness is an objective standard. This assumption is directly contrary to reality. There are man competing definitions of what constitutes good versus evil. As another answer pointed out, a woman crusading for women's rights would be considered "doing good" by some people and "doing evil" by others.

  3. Even if you did accept the premises of the argument, it is not a proof of the existence of God. We know that Oscar the Grouch is a fictional character, despite the fact that we have defined him to be the quintessential of smelliness. As a mathematician would say "The existence of an infimum of a set does not imply that the infimum is a member of the set." Even if we did accept that "God" is the maximum of goodness, that does not imply that God exists.

My evaluation of Dawkins' argument is that he is so shocked that Aquinas fails to notice this third point that Dawkins forgets to explicitly state it. Or else he thinks it is so obvious that it does not need to be stated.

Judging Dawkins' argument solely by the quotation above, I would say that Dawkins response is a form of "argument by satire" which is a type of fallacy.

Furthermore, the argument is truncated (whether the truncation is by Dawkins or by OP, I cannot say). The argument could go on to say "we define the maximum amount of smelliness as 'Oscar the Grouch'". Then again, Dawkins, being British, may not be familiar with Oscar.

Some flaws with Aquinas's argument are (these flaws are not explicitly stated by Dawkins in the above quote):

  1. Sentence three "But we judge these degrees only by comparison with a maximum." is utterly false. Tallness, for example, is a comparison which is entirely relative, and is not compared to some sort of maximum. There are many comparisons that are not in reference to some theoreical maximum. Given that this premise is wrong, the argument can only stand if one then justifies that "goodness" is measured relative to a maximum. Such a justification is not included in Aquinas's "proof".

  2. The argument presumes that goodness is an objective standard. This assumption is directly contrary to reality. There are man competing definitions of what constitutes good versus evil. As another answer pointed out, a woman crusading for women's rights would be considered "doing good" by some people and "doing evil" by others.

  3. Even if you did accept the premises of the argument, it is not a proof of the existence of God. We know that Oscar the Grouch is a fictional character, despite the fact that we have defined him to be the quintessential of smelliness. As a mathematician would say "The existence of an infimum of a set does not imply that the infimum is a member of the set." Even if we did accept that "God" is the maximum of goodness, that does not imply that God exists.

Judging Dawkins' argument solely by the quotation above, I would say that Dawkins response is a form of "argument by satire" which is a type of fallacy.

Furthermore, the argument is truncated (whether the truncation is by Dawkins or by OP, I cannot say). The argument could go on to say "we define the maximum amount of smelliness as 'Oscar the Grouch'". Then again, Dawkins, being British, may not be familiar with Oscar.

Some flaws with Aquinas's argument are (these flaws are not explicitly stated by Dawkins in the above quote):

  1. Sentence three "But we judge these degrees only by comparison with a maximum." is utterly false. Tallness, for example, is a comparison which is entirely relative, and is not compared to some sort of maximum. There are many comparisons that are not in reference to some theoreical maximum. Given that this premise is wrong, the argument can only stand if one then justifies that "goodness" is measured relative to a maximum. Such a justification is not included in Aquinas's "proof".

  2. The argument presumes that goodness is an objective standard. This assumption is directly contrary to reality. There are man competing definitions of what constitutes good versus evil. As another answer pointed out, a woman crusading for women's rights would be considered "doing good" by some people and "doing evil" by others.

  3. Even if you did accept the premises of the argument, it is not a proof of the existence of God. We know that Oscar the Grouch is a fictional character, despite the fact that we have defined him to be the quintessential of smelliness. As a mathematician would say "The existence of an infimum of a set does not imply that the infimum is a member of the set." Even if we did accept that "God" is the maximum of goodness, that does not imply that God exists.

My evaluation of Dawkins' argument is that he is so shocked that Aquinas fails to notice this third point that Dawkins forgets to explicitly state it. Or else he thinks it is so obvious that it does not need to be stated.

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Judging Dawkins' argument solely by the quotation above, I would say that Dawkins response is a form of "argument by satire" which is a type of fallacy.

Furthermore, the argument is truncated (whether the truncation is by Dawkins or by OP, I cannot say). The argument could go on to say "we define the maximum amount of smelliness as 'Oscar the Grouch'". Then again, Dawkins, being British, may not be familiar with Oscar.

Some flaws with Aquinas's argument are (these flaws are not explicitly stated by Dawkins in the above quote):

  1. Sentence three "But we judge these degrees only by comparison with a maximum." is utterly false. Tallness, for example, is a comparison which is entirely relative, and is not compared to some sort of maximum. There are many comparisons that are not in reference to some theoreical maximum. Given that this premise is wrong, the argument can only stand if one then justifies that "goodness" is measured relative to a maximum. Such a justification is not included in Aquinas's "proof".

  2. The argument presumes that goodness is an objective standard. This assumption is directly contrary to reality. There are man competing definitions of what constitutes good versus evil. As another answer pointed out, a woman crusading for women's rights would be considered "doing good" by some people and "doing evil" by others.

  3. Even if you did accept the premises of the argument, it is not a proof of the existence of God. We know that Oscar the Grouch is a fictional character, despite the fact that we have defined him to be the quintessential of smelliness. As a mathematician would say "The existence of an infimum of a set does not imply that the infimum is a member of the set." Even if we did accept that "God" is the maximum of goodness, that does not imply that God exists.