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Please see my response to this similar question here:

Does the concept of infinity mean we have already 'been'?here.

Summary: If the set of possible states is bounded, then some state must recur. But if not, not. The set of states 1, 2, 3, 4, ... never repeats. But if you say that there are only 3 states, then some state must repeat infinitely many times. But it is not necessarily the case that all states will recur. So for example if there are infinitely many universes and only finitely many legal states available in a region of spacetime, then somebody has infinitely many copies of themselves out there; but most likely not me, and most likely not you. Like the kids say these days: YOLO. You only live once. They don't realize this, but they are making a deep and insightful point about cosmology and metaphysics.

But please do see my original response, which also considers the probabilistic argument often seen online. Long story short, probability zero events can occur in infinite probability spaces; therefore the probabilistic argument that we all live many times is false.

And besides: We don't know what constraints are imposed by the laws of physics on the set of allowable states. So the naive argument that "Everything must happen in an infinite sample space" is just false.

Please see my response to this similar question here:

Does the concept of infinity mean we have already 'been'?

Summary: If the set of possible states is bounded, then some state must recur. But if not, not. The set of states 1, 2, 3, 4, ... never repeats. But if you say that there are only 3 states, then some state must repeat infinitely many times. But it is not necessarily the case that all states will recur. So for example if there are infinitely many universes and only finitely many legal states available in a region of spacetime, then somebody has infinitely many copies of themselves out there; but most likely not me, and most likely not you. Like the kids say these days: YOLO. You only live once. They don't realize this, but they are making a deep and insightful point about cosmology and metaphysics.

But please do see my original response, which also considers the probabilistic argument often seen online. Long story short, probability zero events can occur in infinite probability spaces; therefore the probabilistic argument that we all live many times is false.

And besides: We don't know what constraints are imposed by the laws of physics on the set of allowable states. So the naive argument that "Everything must happen in an infinite sample space" is just false.

Please see my response to this similar question here.

Summary: If the set of possible states is bounded, then some state must recur. But if not, not. The set of states 1, 2, 3, 4, ... never repeats. But if you say that there are only 3 states, then some state must repeat infinitely many times. But it is not necessarily the case that all states will recur. So for example if there are infinitely many universes and only finitely many legal states available in a region of spacetime, then somebody has infinitely many copies of themselves out there; but most likely not me, and most likely not you. Like the kids say these days: YOLO. You only live once. They don't realize this, but they are making a deep and insightful point about cosmology and metaphysics.

But please do see my original response, which also considers the probabilistic argument often seen online. Long story short, probability zero events can occur in infinite probability spaces; therefore the probabilistic argument that we all live many times is false.

And besides: We don't know what constraints are imposed by the laws of physics on the set of allowable states. So the naive argument that "Everything must happen in an infinite sample space" is just false.

5 fixed link to answer
source | link

Please see my response to this similar question here ...:

[Does the concept of infinity mean we have already 'been'?Does the concept of infinity mean we have already 'been'?

Summary: If the set of possible states is bounded, then some state must recur. But if not, not. The set of states 1, 2, 3, 4, ... never repeats. But if you say that there are only 3 states, then some state must repeat infinitely many times. But it is not necessarily the case that all states will recur. So for example if there are infinitely many universes and only finitely many legal states available in a region of spacetime, then somebody has infinitely many copies of themselves out there; but most likely not me, and most likely not you. Like the kids say these days: YOLO. You only live once. They don't realize this, but they are making a deep and insightful point about cosmology and metaphysics.

But please do see my original response, which also considers the probabilistic argument often seen online. Long story short, probability zero events can occur in infinite probability spaces; therefore the probabilistic argument that we all live many times is false.

And besides: We don't know what constraints are imposed by the laws of physics on the set of allowable states. So the naive argument that "Everything must happen in an infinite sample space" is just false.

Please see my response to this similar question here ...

[Does the concept of infinity mean we have already 'been'?

Summary: If the set of possible states is bounded, then some state must recur. But if not, not. The set of states 1, 2, 3, 4, ... never repeats. But if you say that there are only 3 states, then some state must repeat infinitely many times. But it is not necessarily the case that all states will recur. So for example if there are infinitely many universes and only finitely many legal states available in a region of spacetime, then somebody has infinitely many copies of themselves out there; but most likely not me, and most likely not you. Like the kids say these days: YOLO. You only live once. They don't realize this, but they are making a deep and insightful point about cosmology and metaphysics.

But please do see my original response, which also considers the probabilistic argument often seen online. Long story short, probability zero events can occur in infinite probability spaces; therefore the probabilistic argument that we all live many times is false.

And besides: We don't know what constraints are imposed by the laws of physics on the set of allowable states. So the naive argument that "Everything must happen in an infinite sample space" is just false.

Please see my response to this similar question here:

Does the concept of infinity mean we have already 'been'?

Summary: If the set of possible states is bounded, then some state must recur. But if not, not. The set of states 1, 2, 3, 4, ... never repeats. But if you say that there are only 3 states, then some state must repeat infinitely many times. But it is not necessarily the case that all states will recur. So for example if there are infinitely many universes and only finitely many legal states available in a region of spacetime, then somebody has infinitely many copies of themselves out there; but most likely not me, and most likely not you. Like the kids say these days: YOLO. You only live once. They don't realize this, but they are making a deep and insightful point about cosmology and metaphysics.

But please do see my original response, which also considers the probabilistic argument often seen online. Long story short, probability zero events can occur in infinite probability spaces; therefore the probabilistic argument that we all live many times is false.

And besides: We don't know what constraints are imposed by the laws of physics on the set of allowable states. So the naive argument that "Everything must happen in an infinite sample space" is just false.

4 replaced http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/ with https://philosophy.stackexchange.com/
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Please see my response to this similar question here ...

[http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/16048/does-the-concept-of-infinity-mean-we-have-already-been/16057][1]#16057Does the concept of infinity mean we have already 'been'?

Summary: If the set of possible states is bounded, then some state must recur. But if not, not. The set of states 1, 2, 3, 4, ... never repeats. But if you say that there are only 3 states, then some state must repeat infinitely many times. But it is not necessarily the case that all states will recur. So for example if there are infinitely many universes and only finitely many legal states available in a region of spacetime, then somebody has infinitely many copies of themselves out there; but most likely not me, and most likely not you. Like the kids say these days: YOLO. You only live once. They don't realize this, but they are making a deep and insightful point about cosmology and metaphysics.

But please do see my original response, which also considers the probabilistic argument often seen online. Long story short, probability zero events can occur in infinite probability spaces; therefore the probabilistic argument that we all live many times is false.

And besides: We don't know what constraints are imposed by the laws of physics on the set of allowable states. So the naive argument that "Everything must happen in an infinite sample space" is just false.

Please see my response to this similar question here ...

[http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/16048/does-the-concept-of-infinity-mean-we-have-already-been/16057][1]#16057

Summary: If the set of possible states is bounded, then some state must recur. But if not, not. The set of states 1, 2, 3, 4, ... never repeats. But if you say that there are only 3 states, then some state must repeat infinitely many times. But it is not necessarily the case that all states will recur. So for example if there are infinitely many universes and only finitely many legal states available in a region of spacetime, then somebody has infinitely many copies of themselves out there; but most likely not me, and most likely not you. Like the kids say these days: YOLO. You only live once. They don't realize this, but they are making a deep and insightful point about cosmology and metaphysics.

But please do see my original response, which also considers the probabilistic argument often seen online. Long story short, probability zero events can occur in infinite probability spaces; therefore the probabilistic argument that we all live many times is false.

And besides: We don't know what constraints are imposed by the laws of physics on the set of allowable states. So the naive argument that "Everything must happen in an infinite sample space" is just false.

Please see my response to this similar question here ...

[Does the concept of infinity mean we have already 'been'?

Summary: If the set of possible states is bounded, then some state must recur. But if not, not. The set of states 1, 2, 3, 4, ... never repeats. But if you say that there are only 3 states, then some state must repeat infinitely many times. But it is not necessarily the case that all states will recur. So for example if there are infinitely many universes and only finitely many legal states available in a region of spacetime, then somebody has infinitely many copies of themselves out there; but most likely not me, and most likely not you. Like the kids say these days: YOLO. You only live once. They don't realize this, but they are making a deep and insightful point about cosmology and metaphysics.

But please do see my original response, which also considers the probabilistic argument often seen online. Long story short, probability zero events can occur in infinite probability spaces; therefore the probabilistic argument that we all live many times is false.

And besides: We don't know what constraints are imposed by the laws of physics on the set of allowable states. So the naive argument that "Everything must happen in an infinite sample space" is just false.

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