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Should I really start with learning logic ?

Every course of philosophical studies I know includes introductory classes to basic formal logic (syntax and semantics of propositional and predicate first-order logic, some metatheory of propositional calculi).

It is not necessary to learn formal logic before delving into Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but it is certainly necessary to learn some logic if you want to achieve a somewhat comprehensive philosophical education and gain access to a good chunk of contemporary philosophy.

Two very basic examples:

One can surely acquire these notions as one gets along, but a basic course in the beginning obviates to repeated cognitive nuisances.

Having said that, the self-study of formal logic may be tedious if you are not particularly drawn to mathematical thinking on your own: repeatedly solving exercises is the only way to go. (That is why it is good thing to be compelled to go through such a training: to learn a different way of thinking and reasoning!)

The easier route is to familiarize yourself with the toolset taught in critical thinking. This is not a replacement for a basic training in formal logic, but it may help you if you only want to read some classics. You can follow up the bibliography about informal logic/reasoninginformal logic/reasoning.

On which books should I focus on to start learning philosophy ?

Check out What are some good introductions to philosophy?What are some good introductions to philosophy? for some good answers.

I wish you a rewarding philosophical journey!

Should I really start with learning logic ?

Every course of philosophical studies I know includes introductory classes to basic formal logic (syntax and semantics of propositional and predicate first-order logic, some metatheory of propositional calculi).

It is not necessary to learn formal logic before delving into Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but it is certainly necessary to learn some logic if you want to achieve a somewhat comprehensive philosophical education and gain access to a good chunk of contemporary philosophy.

Two very basic examples:

One can surely acquire these notions as one gets along, but a basic course in the beginning obviates to repeated cognitive nuisances.

Having said that, the self-study of formal logic may be tedious if you are not particularly drawn to mathematical thinking on your own: repeatedly solving exercises is the only way to go. (That is why it is good thing to be compelled to go through such a training: to learn a different way of thinking and reasoning!)

The easier route is to familiarize yourself with the toolset taught in critical thinking. This is not a replacement for a basic training in formal logic, but it may help you if you only want to read some classics. You can follow up the bibliography about informal logic/reasoning.

On which books should I focus on to start learning philosophy ?

Check out What are some good introductions to philosophy? for some good answers.

I wish you a rewarding philosophical journey!

Should I really start with learning logic ?

Every course of philosophical studies I know includes introductory classes to basic formal logic (syntax and semantics of propositional and predicate first-order logic, some metatheory of propositional calculi).

It is not necessary to learn formal logic before delving into Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but it is certainly necessary to learn some logic if you want to achieve a somewhat comprehensive philosophical education and gain access to a good chunk of contemporary philosophy.

Two very basic examples:

One can surely acquire these notions as one gets along, but a basic course in the beginning obviates to repeated cognitive nuisances.

Having said that, the self-study of formal logic may be tedious if you are not particularly drawn to mathematical thinking on your own: repeatedly solving exercises is the only way to go. (That is why it is good thing to be compelled to go through such a training: to learn a different way of thinking and reasoning!)

The easier route is to familiarize yourself with the toolset taught in critical thinking. This is not a replacement for a basic training in formal logic, but it may help you if you only want to read some classics. You can follow up the bibliography about informal logic/reasoning.

On which books should I focus on to start learning philosophy ?

Check out What are some good introductions to philosophy? for some good answers.

I wish you a rewarding philosophical journey!

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Should I really start with learning logic ?

Every course of philosophical studies I know includes introductory classes into basic formal logic (syntax and semantics of propositional and predicate first-order logic, some metatheory of propositional calculi).

It is not necessary to learn formal logic before delving into Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but it is certainly necessary to learn some logic if you want to achieve a somewhat comprehensive philosophical education and gain access to a good chunk of contemporary philosophy.

Two very basic examples:

One can surely acquire these notions as one gets along, but a basic course in the beginning obviates to repeated cognitive nuisances.

Having said that, the self-study of formal logic may be tedious if you are not particularly drawn to mathematical thinking on your own: repeatedly solving exercises is the only way to go. (That is why it is good thing to be compelled to go through such a training: to learn a different way of thinking and reasoning!)

The easier route is to familiarize yourself with the toolset taught in critical thinking. This is not a replacement for a basic training in formal logic, but it may help you if you only want to read some classics. You can follow up the bibliography about informal logic/reasoning.

On which books should I focus on to start learning philosophy ?

Check out What are some good introductions to philosophy? for some good answers.

I wish you a rewarding philosophical journey!

Should I really start with learning logic ?

Every course of philosophical studies I know includes classes in basic formal logic.

It is not necessary to learn formal logic before delving into Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but it is certainly necessary to learn some logic if you want to achieve a somewhat comprehensive philosophical education and gain access to a good chunk of contemporary philosophy.

Two very basic examples:

One can surely acquire these notions as one gets along, but a basic course in the beginning obviates to repeated cognitive nuisances.

Having said that, the self-study of formal logic may be tedious if you are not particularly drawn to mathematical thinking on your own: repeatedly solving exercises is the only way to go. (That is why it is good thing to be compelled to go through such a training: to learn a different way of thinking and reasoning!)

The easier route is to familiarize yourself with the toolset taught in critical thinking. This is not a replacement for a basic training in formal logic, but it may help you if you only want to read some classics. You can follow up the bibliography about informal logic/reasoning.

On which books should I focus on to start learning philosophy ?

Check out What are some good introductions to philosophy? for some good answers.

I wish you a rewarding philosophical journey!

Should I really start with learning logic ?

Every course of philosophical studies I know includes introductory classes to basic formal logic (syntax and semantics of propositional and predicate first-order logic, some metatheory of propositional calculi).

It is not necessary to learn formal logic before delving into Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but it is certainly necessary to learn some logic if you want to achieve a somewhat comprehensive philosophical education and gain access to a good chunk of contemporary philosophy.

Two very basic examples:

One can surely acquire these notions as one gets along, but a basic course in the beginning obviates to repeated cognitive nuisances.

Having said that, the self-study of formal logic may be tedious if you are not particularly drawn to mathematical thinking on your own: repeatedly solving exercises is the only way to go. (That is why it is good thing to be compelled to go through such a training: to learn a different way of thinking and reasoning!)

The easier route is to familiarize yourself with the toolset taught in critical thinking. This is not a replacement for a basic training in formal logic, but it may help you if you only want to read some classics. You can follow up the bibliography about informal logic/reasoning.

On which books should I focus on to start learning philosophy ?

Check out What are some good introductions to philosophy? for some good answers.

I wish you a rewarding philosophical journey!

added 15 characters in body
Source Link
DBK
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  • 22
  • 44

Should I really start with learning logic ?

Every course of philosophical studies I know includes classes in basic formal logic.

It is not necessary to learn formal logic before delving into Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but it is certainly necessary to learn some logic if you want to achieve a somewhat comprehensive philosophical education and gain access to a good chunk of contemporary philosophy.

Two very basic examples:

One can surely acquire these notions as one gets along, but a basic course in the beginning obviates to repeated cognitive nuisances.

Having said that, the self-study of formal logic may be tedious if you are not particularly drawn to mathematical thinking on your own: repeatedly solving exercises is the only way to go. (That is why it is good exercizething to be compelled to go through such a training: to learn a different way of thinking and reasoning!)

The easier route is to familiarize yourself with the toolset taught in critical thinking. This is not a replacement for a basic training in formal logic, but it may help you if you only want to read some classics. You can follow up the bibliography about informal logic/reasoning.

On which books should I focus on to start learning philosophy ?

Check out What are some good introductions to philosophy? for some good answers.

I wish you a rewarding philosophical journey!

Should I really start with learning logic ?

Every course of philosophical studies I know includes classes in basic formal logic.

It is not necessary to learn formal logic before delving into Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but it is certainly necessary to learn some logic if you want to achieve a somewhat comprehensive philosophical education and gain access to a good chunk of contemporary philosophy.

Two very basic examples:

One can surely acquire these notions as one gets along, but a basic course in the beginning obviates to repeated cognitive nuisances.

Having said that, the self-study of formal logic may be tedious if you are not particularly drawn to mathematical thinking on your own. (That is why it is good exercize to be compelled to go through such a training: to learn a different way of thinking and reasoning!)

The easier route is to familiarize yourself with the toolset taught in critical thinking. This is not a replacement for a basic training in formal logic, but it may help you if you only want to read some classics. You can follow up the bibliography about informal logic/reasoning.

On which books should I focus on to start learning philosophy ?

Check out What are some good introductions to philosophy? for some good answers.

I wish you a rewarding philosophical journey!

Should I really start with learning logic ?

Every course of philosophical studies I know includes classes in basic formal logic.

It is not necessary to learn formal logic before delving into Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but it is certainly necessary to learn some logic if you want to achieve a somewhat comprehensive philosophical education and gain access to a good chunk of contemporary philosophy.

Two very basic examples:

One can surely acquire these notions as one gets along, but a basic course in the beginning obviates to repeated cognitive nuisances.

Having said that, the self-study of formal logic may be tedious if you are not particularly drawn to mathematical thinking on your own: repeatedly solving exercises is the only way to go. (That is why it is good thing to be compelled to go through such a training: to learn a different way of thinking and reasoning!)

The easier route is to familiarize yourself with the toolset taught in critical thinking. This is not a replacement for a basic training in formal logic, but it may help you if you only want to read some classics. You can follow up the bibliography about informal logic/reasoning.

On which books should I focus on to start learning philosophy ?

Check out What are some good introductions to philosophy? for some good answers.

I wish you a rewarding philosophical journey!

Source Link
DBK
  • 5.3k
  • 22
  • 44
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