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are Wittgensteins Are Wittgenstein's propositions analytic or synthetic?

Wittgenstein provides a logical analysis of propositions in the Tractatus; does. Does he there admit the Kantian distinctions between analytic/synthetic and a priori/a postereroiposteriori divisions; or does his analysis apply to all without distinction?

Or should we look later into his Investigations where he develops a division that resembles the analytic/synthetic distinction, in a sense: that is the notion of private and public languages?

are Wittgensteins propositions analytic or synthetic?

Wittgenstein provides a logical analysis of propositions in the Tractatus; does he there admit the Kantian distinctions between analytic/synthetic and a priori/a postereroi divisions; or does his analysis apply to all without distinction?

Or should we look later into his Investigations where he develops a division that resembles the analytic/synthetic distinction, in a sense: that is the notion of private and public languages?

Are Wittgenstein's propositions analytic or synthetic?

Wittgenstein provides a logical analysis of propositions in the Tractatus. Does he there admit the Kantian distinctions between analytic/synthetic and a priori/a posteriori divisions; or does his analysis apply to all without distinction?

Or should we look later into his Investigations where he develops a division that resembles the analytic/synthetic distinction, in a sense: that is the notion of private and public languages?

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source | link

are Wittgensteins propositions analytic or synthetic?

Wittgenstein provides a logical analysis of propositions in the Tractatus; does he there admit the Kantian distinctions between analytic/synthetic and a priori/a postereroi divisions; or does his analysis apply to all without distinction?

Or should we look later into his Investigations where he develops a division that resembles the analytic/synthetic distinction, in a sense: that is the notion of private and public languages?