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I was tempted to ask "Why didn't Badiou include religion among his conditions?," but we will never know the answer to that. So instead I will ask if there are instances in Badiou's work, or in the work of other scholars, in which religion is explicitly situated among, across or outside the "conditions"/"truth procedures" which BadioBadiou designates as independent of philosophy.

The "conditions" Badiou names are art, love, politics, and science.

  • Does religion fall under one of these headings?
  • Is there an argument to be made for adding "religion" to the list as a unique condition?
  • Or was religion deliberately excluded from this list?

I was tempted to ask "Why didn't Badiou include religion among his conditions?," but we will never know the answer to that. So instead I will ask if there are instances in Badiou's work, or in the work of other scholars, in which religion is explicitly situated among, across or outside the "conditions"/"truth procedures" which Badio designates as independent of philosophy.

The "conditions" Badiou names are art, love, politics, and science.

  • Does religion fall under one of these headings?
  • Is there an argument to be made for adding "religion" to the list as a unique condition?
  • Or was religion deliberately excluded from this list?

I was tempted to ask "Why didn't Badiou include religion among his conditions?," but we will never know the answer to that. So instead I will ask if there are instances in Badiou's work, or in the work of other scholars, in which religion is explicitly situated among, across or outside the "conditions"/"truth procedures" which Badiou designates as independent of philosophy.

The "conditions" Badiou names are art, love, politics, and science.

  • Does religion fall under one of these headings?
  • Is there an argument to be made for adding "religion" to the list as a unique condition?
  • Or was religion deliberately excluded from this list?
2 added 19 characters in body
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I was tempted to ask "Why didn't Badiou include religion among his conditions?," but we will never know the answer to that. So instead I will ask if there are instances in Badiou's work, or in the work of other scholars, in which religion is explicitly situated among, across or outside the "conditions"/"truth procedures" which Badio designates as independent of philosophy.

The "conditions" Badiou names are art, love, politics, and science.

  • Does religion fall under one of these headings?
  • Is there an argument to be made for adding "religion" to the list as a unique condition?
  • Or was religion deliberately excluded from this list?

I was tempted to ask "Why didn't Badiou include religion among his conditions?," but we will never know the answer to that. So instead I will ask if there are instances in Badiou's work, or in the work of other scholars, in which religion is explicitly situated among the "conditions"/"truth procedures" which Badio designates as independent of philosophy.

The "conditions" Badiou names are art, love, politics, and science.

  • Does religion fall under one of these headings?
  • Is there an argument to be made for adding "religion" to the list as a unique condition?
  • Or was religion deliberately excluded from this list?

I was tempted to ask "Why didn't Badiou include religion among his conditions?," but we will never know the answer to that. So instead I will ask if there are instances in Badiou's work, or in the work of other scholars, in which religion is explicitly situated among, across or outside the "conditions"/"truth procedures" which Badio designates as independent of philosophy.

The "conditions" Badiou names are art, love, politics, and science.

  • Does religion fall under one of these headings?
  • Is there an argument to be made for adding "religion" to the list as a unique condition?
  • Or was religion deliberately excluded from this list?
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To which of Badiou's four conditions does religion belong?

I was tempted to ask "Why didn't Badiou include religion among his conditions?," but we will never know the answer to that. So instead I will ask if there are instances in Badiou's work, or in the work of other scholars, in which religion is explicitly situated among the "conditions"/"truth procedures" which Badio designates as independent of philosophy.

The "conditions" Badiou names are art, love, politics, and science.

  • Does religion fall under one of these headings?
  • Is there an argument to be made for adding "religion" to the list as a unique condition?
  • Or was religion deliberately excluded from this list?