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I like the interpretation of this position given by Sextus Empiricus: That the best approach to knowledge is to continually set aside one's concern for whether or not something is true. Thus it is not just belief replacing certainty, it is continual avoidance of belief, and seeking to hold all opinions in appropriate perspective.

I think it is likely to be what Socrates and the Cynics had in mind when they said the wisest man was the one who knew nothing, because believing something wrong was worse than being ignorant.

Of course, this, like many other Golden Mean interpretations is a self-contradictory position, if you believe it. Moderation in all things but moderation, tolerance of everything but intolerance, etc. But it escapes this paradox in practice, because if you apply it to itself, you don't really believe it, and it does not bother you to act upon it.

I like the interpretation of this position given by Sextus Empiricus: That the best approach to knowledge is to continually set aside one's concern for whether or not something is true. Thus it is not just belief replacing certainty, it is continual avoidance of belief, and seeking to hold all opinions in appropriate perspective.

I think it is likely to be what Socrates and the Cynics had in mind when they said the wisest man was the one who knew nothing, because believing something wrong was worse than being ignorant.

Of course, this, like many other Golden Mean interpretations is a self-contradictory position. But if you don't really believe it, it does not bother you to act upon it.

I like the interpretation of this position given by Sextus Empiricus: That the best approach to knowledge is to continually set aside one's concern for whether or not something is true. Thus it is not just belief replacing certainty, it is continual avoidance of belief, and seeking to hold all opinions in appropriate perspective.

I think it is likely to be what Socrates and the Cynics had in mind when they said the wisest man was the one who knew nothing, because believing something wrong was worse than being ignorant.

Of course, this, like many other Golden Mean interpretations is a self-contradictory position, if you believe it. Moderation in all things but moderation, tolerance of everything but intolerance, etc. But it escapes this paradox in practice, because if you apply it to itself, you don't really believe it, and it does not bother you to act upon it.

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source | link

I like the interpretation of this position given by Sextus Empiricus: That the best approach to knowledge is to continually set aside one's concern for whether or not something is true. Thus it is not just belief replacing certainty, it is continual avoidance of belief, and seeking to hold all opinions in appropriate perspective.

I think it is likely to be what Socrates and the Cynics had in mind when they said the wisest man was the one who knew nothing, because believing something wrong was worse than being ignorant.

Of course, this, like many other Golden Mean interpretations is a self-contradictory position. But if you don't really believe it, it does not bother you to act upon it.