3 added 77 characters in body
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Derek Parfit (of Reasons and Persons fame) lists the definition of the self that is implicit in your scenario as only one of many alternative views that are held also by experts in the field:

The main debates have all been about the question whether it will still be me who will exist for example at some point in the future […] There are many different views. Perhaps the quickest checklist would be: Some people think it will be me so long as there is there is same body, that I am really this body here. Others think […] I go where my brain goes, and so they think that if my brain was successfully put into someone else’s empty skull I would wake up in that other body […] Others think that what I essentially am and is my soul could, say, be reincarnated in a different body or my could go to haven even if my body is destroyed. And then yet others appeal to memory and other psychological characteristics. On this view if there would be somebody who remembers these experiences, then it will be me. So those are the four most obvious contenders there.

So here you have an answer on some authority: philosophers do not agree on whether rebuilding a human body would rebuild the person. Some say yes, others say no. FWIK Parfit himself might answer no, because he favors the memory-related view.

Derek Parfit (of Reasons and Persons fame) lists the definition of the self that is implicit in your scenario as only one of many alternative views that are held also by experts in the field:

The main debates have all been about the question whether it will still be me who will exist for example at some point in the future […] There are many different views. Perhaps the quickest checklist would be: Some people think it will be me so long as there is there is same body, that I am really this body here. Others think […] I go where my brain goes, and so they think that if my brain was successfully put into someone else’s empty skull I would wake up in that other body […] Others think that what I essentially am and is my soul could, say, be reincarnated in a different body or my could go to haven even if my body is destroyed. And then yet others appeal to memory and other psychological characteristics. On this view if there would be somebody who remembers these experiences, then it will be me. So those are the four most obvious contenders there.

So here you have an answer on some authority: philosophers do not agree on whether rebuilding a human body would rebuild the person. Some say yes, others say no.

Derek Parfit (of Reasons and Persons fame) lists the definition of the self that is implicit in your scenario as only one of many alternative views that are held also by experts in the field:

The main debates have all been about the question whether it will still be me who will exist for example at some point in the future […] There are many different views. Perhaps the quickest checklist would be: Some people think it will be me so long as there is there is same body, that I am really this body here. Others think […] I go where my brain goes, and so they think that if my brain was successfully put into someone else’s empty skull I would wake up in that other body […] Others think that what I essentially am and is my soul could, say, be reincarnated in a different body or my could go to haven even if my body is destroyed. And then yet others appeal to memory and other psychological characteristics. On this view if there would be somebody who remembers these experiences, then it will be me. So those are the four most obvious contenders there.

So here you have an answer on some authority: philosophers do not agree on whether rebuilding a human body would rebuild the person. Some say yes, others say no. FWIK Parfit himself might answer no, because he favors the memory-related view.

2 added 5 characters in body
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Derek Parfit (of Reasons and Persons fame) lists the definition of the self that is implicit in your scenario as only one of many alternative views that are held also by experts in the field:

The main debates have all been about the question whether it will still be me who will exist for example at some point in the future […] There are many different views. Perhaps the quickest checklist would be: Some people think it will be me so long as there is there is same body, that I am really this body here. Others think […] I go where my brain goes, and so they think that if my brain was successfully put into someone else’s empty skull I would wake up in that other body […] Others think that what I essentially am and is my soul could, say, be reincarnated in a different body or my could go to haven even if my body is destroyed. And then yet others appeal to memory and other psychological characteristics. On this view if there would be somebody who remembers these experiences, then it will be me. So those are the four most obvious contenders there.

So here you have an answer on some authority: philosophers do not agree on whether rebuilding a human body would rebuild the person. Some say yes, someothers say no.

Derek Parfit (of Reasons and Persons fame) lists the definition of the self that is implicit in your scenario as only one of many alternative views that are held by experts in the field:

The main debates have all been about the question whether it will still be me who will exist for example at some point in the future […] There are many different views. Perhaps the quickest checklist would be: Some people think it will be me so long as there is there is same body, that I am really this body here. Others think […] I go where my brain goes, and so they think that if my brain was successfully put into someone else’s empty skull I would wake up in that other body […] Others think that what I essentially am and is my soul could, say, be reincarnated in a different body or my could go to haven even if my body is destroyed. And then yet others appeal to memory and other psychological characteristics. On this view if there would be somebody who remembers these experiences, then it will be me. So those are the four most obvious contenders there.

So here you have an answer on some authority: philosophers do not agree on whether rebuilding a human body would rebuild the person. Some say yes, some say no.

Derek Parfit (of Reasons and Persons fame) lists the definition of the self that is implicit in your scenario as only one of many alternative views that are held also by experts in the field:

The main debates have all been about the question whether it will still be me who will exist for example at some point in the future […] There are many different views. Perhaps the quickest checklist would be: Some people think it will be me so long as there is there is same body, that I am really this body here. Others think […] I go where my brain goes, and so they think that if my brain was successfully put into someone else’s empty skull I would wake up in that other body […] Others think that what I essentially am and is my soul could, say, be reincarnated in a different body or my could go to haven even if my body is destroyed. And then yet others appeal to memory and other psychological characteristics. On this view if there would be somebody who remembers these experiences, then it will be me. So those are the four most obvious contenders there.

So here you have an answer on some authority: philosophers do not agree on whether rebuilding a human body would rebuild the person. Some say yes, others say no.

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source | link

Derek Parfit (of Reasons and Persons fame) lists the definition of the self that is implicit in your scenario as only one of many alternative views that are held by experts in the field:

The main debates have all been about the question whether it will still be me who will exist for example at some point in the future […] There are many different views. Perhaps the quickest checklist would be: Some people think it will be me so long as there is there is same body, that I am really this body here. Others think […] I go where my brain goes, and so they think that if my brain was successfully put into someone else’s empty skull I would wake up in that other body […] Others think that what I essentially am and is my soul could, say, be reincarnated in a different body or my could go to haven even if my body is destroyed. And then yet others appeal to memory and other psychological characteristics. On this view if there would be somebody who remembers these experiences, then it will be me. So those are the four most obvious contenders there.

So here you have an answer on some authority: philosophers do not agree on whether rebuilding a human body would rebuild the person. Some say yes, some say no.