6 edited title
| link

What is the a fallacy that dismisses problems by presenting "bigger" problems?

5 edited tags
| link
4 added 1 character in body
source | link

Wasn't really sure how to phrase this, but I'm thinking of an instance in which someone diminishes a problem by presenting one of larger scope  - as a rather shoddy example, "x political problem in America doesn't matter because half the world's population is starving."

I honestly have no idea if this is considered fallacious or not, but for some odd reason I can't shake the feeling that someone has described it to me as a fallacy before. Am I crazy or is there something to this (or something similar)?

Wasn't really sure how to phrase this, but I'm thinking of an instance in which someone diminishes a problem by presenting one of larger scope- as a rather shoddy example, "x political problem in America doesn't matter because half the world's population is starving."

I honestly have no idea if this is considered fallacious or not, but for some odd reason I can't shake the feeling that someone has described it to me as a fallacy before. Am I crazy or is there something to this (or something similar)?

Wasn't really sure how to phrase this, but I'm thinking of an instance in which someone diminishes a problem by presenting one of larger scope  - as a rather shoddy example, "x political problem in America doesn't matter because half the world's population is starving."

I honestly have no idea if this is considered fallacious or not, but for some odd reason I can't shake the feeling that someone has described it to me as a fallacy before. Am I crazy or is there something to this (or something similar)?

3 edited tags
| link
    Tweeted twitter.com/StackPhilosophy/status/720221520447016960
2 edited title
| link
1
source | link