3 replaced http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/ with https://philosophy.stackexchange.com/
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Prompted by the current discussion about Kant’s concept of causality of freedom http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/28746/can-free-will-exist-in-a-causal-material-worldCan Free Will Exist In A Causal Material World? I would like to understand the scope and the difference of the two Kantian concepts

  • Freedom as a transcendental idea
  • Freedom in its practical sense.

See Critique of Pure Reason (CPR), B561ff. Currently, I understand these two concepts as follows:

An idea is a transcendental idea if it refers to our way to create experience – but not to experience itself. In particular, a transcendental idea lives on the meta-level, it belongs to epistemology.

A concept is practical if it has a normative component, i.e. when the concept considers what should be done. In particular, a practical concepts belongs to ethics.

If you can confirm my understanding of these two concepts, I would like to know – according to Kant

  • Why do we need freedom as a transcendental idea?
  • Why does freedom in its practical sense explain our experience?

Note. I would wellcome a direct answer, not an invitation to a tour de force through the secondary literature :-)

Prompted by the current discussion about Kant’s concept of causality of freedom http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/28746/can-free-will-exist-in-a-causal-material-world I would like to understand the scope and the difference of the two Kantian concepts

  • Freedom as a transcendental idea
  • Freedom in its practical sense.

See Critique of Pure Reason (CPR), B561ff. Currently, I understand these two concepts as follows:

An idea is a transcendental idea if it refers to our way to create experience – but not to experience itself. In particular, a transcendental idea lives on the meta-level, it belongs to epistemology.

A concept is practical if it has a normative component, i.e. when the concept considers what should be done. In particular, a practical concepts belongs to ethics.

If you can confirm my understanding of these two concepts, I would like to know – according to Kant

  • Why do we need freedom as a transcendental idea?
  • Why does freedom in its practical sense explain our experience?

Note. I would wellcome a direct answer, not an invitation to a tour de force through the secondary literature :-)

Prompted by the current discussion about Kant’s concept of causality of freedom Can Free Will Exist In A Causal Material World? I would like to understand the scope and the difference of the two Kantian concepts

  • Freedom as a transcendental idea
  • Freedom in its practical sense.

See Critique of Pure Reason (CPR), B561ff. Currently, I understand these two concepts as follows:

An idea is a transcendental idea if it refers to our way to create experience – but not to experience itself. In particular, a transcendental idea lives on the meta-level, it belongs to epistemology.

A concept is practical if it has a normative component, i.e. when the concept considers what should be done. In particular, a practical concepts belongs to ethics.

If you can confirm my understanding of these two concepts, I would like to know – according to Kant

  • Why do we need freedom as a transcendental idea?
  • Why does freedom in its practical sense explain our experience?

Note. I would wellcome a direct answer, not an invitation to a tour de force through the secondary literature :-)

    Tweeted twitter.com/StackPhilosophy/status/655020261088055296
2 Changed part of my second question for clarification: "explain" instead of "describe"
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Prompted by the current discussion about Kant’s concept of causality of freedom http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/28746/can-free-will-exist-in-a-causal-material-world I would like to understand the scope and the difference of the two Kantian concepts

  • Freedom as a transcendental idea
  • Freedom in its practical sense.

See Critique of Pure Reason (CPR), B561ff. Currently, I understand these two concepts as follows:

An idea is a transcendental idea if it refers to our way to create experience – but not to experience itself. In particular, a transcendental idea lives on the meta-level, it belongs to epistemology.

A concept is practical if it has a normative component, i.e. when the concept considers what should be done. In particular, a practical concepts belongs to ethics.

If you can confirm my understanding of these two concepts, I would like to know – according to Kant

  • Why do we need freedom as a transcendental idea?
  • Why does freedom in its practical sense describeexplain our experience?

Note. I would wellcome a direct answer, not an invitation to a tour de force through the secondary literature :-)

Prompted by the current discussion about Kant’s concept of causality of freedom http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/28746/can-free-will-exist-in-a-causal-material-world I would like to understand the scope and the difference of the two Kantian concepts

  • Freedom as a transcendental idea
  • Freedom in its practical sense.

See Critique of Pure Reason (CPR), B561ff. Currently, I understand these two concepts as follows:

An idea is a transcendental idea if it refers to our way to create experience – but not to experience itself. In particular, a transcendental idea lives on the meta-level, it belongs to epistemology.

A concept is practical if it has a normative component, i.e. when the concept considers what should be done. In particular, a practical concepts belongs to ethics.

If you can confirm my understanding of these two concepts, I would like to know – according to Kant

  • Why do we need freedom as a transcendental idea?
  • Why does freedom in its practical sense describe our experience?

Note. I would wellcome a direct answer, not an invitation to a tour de force through the secondary literature :-)

Prompted by the current discussion about Kant’s concept of causality of freedom http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/28746/can-free-will-exist-in-a-causal-material-world I would like to understand the scope and the difference of the two Kantian concepts

  • Freedom as a transcendental idea
  • Freedom in its practical sense.

See Critique of Pure Reason (CPR), B561ff. Currently, I understand these two concepts as follows:

An idea is a transcendental idea if it refers to our way to create experience – but not to experience itself. In particular, a transcendental idea lives on the meta-level, it belongs to epistemology.

A concept is practical if it has a normative component, i.e. when the concept considers what should be done. In particular, a practical concepts belongs to ethics.

If you can confirm my understanding of these two concepts, I would like to know – according to Kant

  • Why do we need freedom as a transcendental idea?
  • Why does freedom in its practical sense explain our experience?

Note. I would wellcome a direct answer, not an invitation to a tour de force through the secondary literature :-)

1
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Kant's distinction of freedom as transcendental idea and as practical concept: What is the benefit?

Prompted by the current discussion about Kant’s concept of causality of freedom http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/28746/can-free-will-exist-in-a-causal-material-world I would like to understand the scope and the difference of the two Kantian concepts

  • Freedom as a transcendental idea
  • Freedom in its practical sense.

See Critique of Pure Reason (CPR), B561ff. Currently, I understand these two concepts as follows:

An idea is a transcendental idea if it refers to our way to create experience – but not to experience itself. In particular, a transcendental idea lives on the meta-level, it belongs to epistemology.

A concept is practical if it has a normative component, i.e. when the concept considers what should be done. In particular, a practical concepts belongs to ethics.

If you can confirm my understanding of these two concepts, I would like to know – according to Kant

  • Why do we need freedom as a transcendental idea?
  • Why does freedom in its practical sense describe our experience?

Note. I would wellcome a direct answer, not an invitation to a tour de force through the secondary literature :-)