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3 elide (off-topic, borderline-offensive) speculation
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My question is NOT about the problems associated with secondary consequences of illegal immigration, such as unemployment of the native workforce. Nor is it about the causes of illegal immigration, such as the hardships faced by people living in a neighboring country, which causes them to cross the border illegally.

I want to look at the issues raised related to interpersonal trust versus the law of the land from a the perspective of duty-based approaches to ethics (e.g. Kantianism).

I think this dilemma is roughly identical to the following: If you have won the trust of a stray dog, is it ethical to turn him/her over to animal-control?

In other words, how do duty-based ethical system resolve conflicts between duties to the state and conflicts between duties to individuals (human or animal) which one is in relationship with?

My question is NOT about the problems associated with secondary consequences of illegal immigration, such as unemployment of the native workforce. Nor is it about the causes of illegal immigration, such as the hardships faced by people living in a neighboring country, which causes them to cross the border illegally.

I want to look at the issues raised related to interpersonal trust versus the law of the land from a the perspective of duty-based approaches to ethics (e.g. Kantianism).

I think this dilemma is roughly identical to the following: If you have won the trust of a stray dog, is it ethical to turn him/her over to animal-control?

In other words, how do duty-based ethical system resolve conflicts between duties to the state and conflicts between duties to individuals (human or animal) which one is in relationship with?

My question is NOT about the problems associated with secondary consequences of illegal immigration, such as unemployment of the native workforce. Nor is it about the causes of illegal immigration, such as the hardships faced by people living in a neighboring country, which causes them to cross the border illegally.

I want to look at the issues raised related to interpersonal trust versus the law of the land from a the perspective of duty-based approaches to ethics (e.g. Kantianism).

In other words, how do duty-based ethical system resolve conflicts between duties to the state and conflicts between duties to individuals (human or animal) which one is in relationship with?

    Question Protected by Keelan
2 added 92 characters in body; edited tags
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My question is NOT about the problems associated with secondary consequences of illegal immigration, such as unemployment of the native workforce. Nor is it about the causes of illegal immigration, such as the hardships faced by people living in a neighboring country, which causes them to cross the border illegally.

My question is specifically about the ethical dilemma of betrayingI want to look at the issues raised related to interpersonal trust of a fellow-being versus breaking the law of the land from a the perspective of duty-based approaches to ethics (e.g. Kantianism).

TheI think this dilemma that is mentioned inroughly identical to the heading can also be asked in another wayfollowing: If you have won the trust of a stray dog, is it ethical to turn him/her over to animal-control?

In other words, whichhow do duty is higher -- your dutybased ethical system resolve conflicts between duties to a fellow-beingthe state and conflicts between duties to individuals / friend,(human or your duty to the laws of your countryanimal) which one is in relationship with?

My question is NOT about the problems associated with secondary consequences of illegal immigration, such as unemployment of the native workforce. Nor is it about the causes of illegal immigration, such as the hardships faced by people living in a neighboring country, which causes them to cross the border illegally.

My question is specifically about the ethical dilemma of betraying the trust of a fellow-being versus breaking the law of the land.

The dilemma that is mentioned in the heading can also be asked in another way: If you have won the trust of a stray dog, is it ethical to turn him/her over to animal-control?

In other words, which duty is higher -- your duty to a fellow-being / friend, or your duty to the laws of your country?

My question is NOT about the problems associated with secondary consequences of illegal immigration, such as unemployment of the native workforce. Nor is it about the causes of illegal immigration, such as the hardships faced by people living in a neighboring country, which causes them to cross the border illegally.

I want to look at the issues raised related to interpersonal trust versus the law of the land from a the perspective of duty-based approaches to ethics (e.g. Kantianism).

I think this dilemma is roughly identical to the following: If you have won the trust of a stray dog, is it ethical to turn him/her over to animal-control?

In other words, how do duty-based ethical system resolve conflicts between duties to the state and conflicts between duties to individuals (human or animal) which one is in relationship with?

1
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If you have won the trust of an illegal immigrant, is it ethical to turn him/her over to the authorities?

My question is NOT about the problems associated with secondary consequences of illegal immigration, such as unemployment of the native workforce. Nor is it about the causes of illegal immigration, such as the hardships faced by people living in a neighboring country, which causes them to cross the border illegally.

My question is specifically about the ethical dilemma of betraying the trust of a fellow-being versus breaking the law of the land.

The dilemma that is mentioned in the heading can also be asked in another way: If you have won the trust of a stray dog, is it ethical to turn him/her over to animal-control?

In other words, which duty is higher -- your duty to a fellow-being / friend, or your duty to the laws of your country?