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A | BA_ | A and B AB | BA and B ___ __ __ ______ A_| B | A or BA or B

T | T | T TT_ | TT |___ T__________________ T_ | TT |__T

T | FT_ | F TF | F___F__________________ T_ | TF |__T

F | TF_ | F FT | T___F__________________ F_ | TT |__T

F | FF_ | F FF | F___F__________________ F_ | FF |__F

As you can see, when conjuncting A, B(A and B) is only true if both prepositions are true. When disjuncting A, B(A or B) is true if both are true or if one of them is true. So what can you interpret from the question? Every dog and cat who's well trained is a good pet. Do you think it needs to be both cat and dog for the sentence to become true or just one of them to sentence be true?

The way I read it:

a) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), good pets imply well trained.

The answers needs that both dog and cat are true, since there is or means that both
don't need to be true at the same time.

b) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), is well trained implies they are good pets.

Again it says dog or cat not both, it needs to be both.

c) For all xx, dog(true) and cat(true), are well trained so good pets.

I believe more in c) than in a) or b) or d) because says that both dog and 
cat are well trained and therefore good pets and for all xx means 'every' so
= Every dog and cat who is well trained is a good pet.

d) For all xx and yy, dog(x-true) and cat(y-true), dog well trained means good pet.

That means:every dog and every cat, and dog who's well trained means good
pet, because the implication is true only for all xx and cat is not x is y.
So cat is not included in the implication (→)

I'm pretty sure is answer c).

b) does not groups cats and dogs. It says that either a cat or a dog is well trained so is a good pet. The way I read it is: Every dog or cat who is well trained is a good pet.

A | B | A and B A | B | A or B

T | T | T T | T | T

T | F | F T | F | T

F | T | F F | T | T

F | F | F F | F | F

As you can see, when conjuncting A, B(A and B) is only true if both prepositions are true. When disjuncting A, B(A or B) is true if both are true or if one of them is true. So what can you interpret from the question? Every dog and cat who's well trained is a good pet. Do you think it needs to be both cat and dog for the sentence to become true or just one of them to sentence be true?

The way I read it:

a) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), good pets imply well trained.

The answers needs that both dog and cat are true, since there is or means that both
don't need to be true at the same time.

b) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), is well trained implies they are good pets.

Again it says dog or cat not both, it needs to be both.

c) For all xx, dog(true) and cat(true), are well trained so good pets.

I believe more in c) than in a) or b) or d) because says that both dog and 
cat are well trained and therefore good pets and for all xx means 'every' so
= Every dog and cat who is well trained is a good pet.

d) For all xx and yy, dog(x-true) and cat(y-true), dog well trained means good pet.

That means:every dog and every cat, and dog who's well trained means good
pet, because the implication is true only for all xx and cat is not x is y.
So cat is not included in the implication (→)

I'm pretty sure is answer c).

b) does not groups cats and dogs. It says that either a cat or a dog is well trained so is a good pet. The way I read it is: Every dog or cat who is well trained is a good pet.

A_ | B | A and B ___ __ __ ______ A_| B | A or B

T_ | T |___ T__________________ T_ | T |__T

T_ | F | ___F__________________ T_ | F |__T

F_ | T | ___F__________________ F_ | T |__T

F_ | F | ___F__________________ F_ | F |__F

As you can see, when conjuncting A, B(A and B) is only true if both prepositions are true. When disjuncting A, B(A or B) is true if both are true or if one of them is true. So what can you interpret from the question? Every dog and cat who's well trained is a good pet. Do you think it needs to be both cat and dog for the sentence to become true or just one of them to sentence be true?

The way I read it:

a) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), good pets imply well trained.

The answers needs that both dog and cat are true, since there is or means that both
don't need to be true at the same time.

b) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), is well trained implies they are good pets.

Again it says dog or cat not both, it needs to be both.

c) For all xx, dog(true) and cat(true), are well trained so good pets.

I believe more in c) than in a) or b) or d) because says that both dog and 
cat are well trained and therefore good pets and for all xx means 'every' so
= Every dog and cat who is well trained is a good pet.

d) For all xx and yy, dog(x-true) and cat(y-true), dog well trained means good pet.

That means:every dog and every cat, and dog who's well trained means good
pet, because the implication is true only for all xx and cat is not x is y.
So cat is not included in the implication (→)

I'm pretty sure is answer c).

b) does not groups cats and dogs. It says that either a cat or a dog is well trained so is a good pet. The way I read it is: Every dog or cat who is well trained is a good pet.

2 added 621 characters in body
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A | B | A and B A | B | A or B

T | T | T T | T | T

T | F | F T | F | T

F | T | F F | T | T

F | F | F F | F | F

As you can see, when conjuncting A, B(A and B) is only true if both prepositions are true. When disjuncting A, B(A or B) is true if both are true or if one of them is true. So what can you interpret from the question? Every dog and cat who's well trained is a good pet. Do you think it needs to be both cat and dog for the sentence to become true or just one of them to sentence be true?

The way I read it:

a) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), good pets imply well trained.

The answers needs that both dog and cat are true, since there is or means that both
don't need to be true at the same time.

b) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), is well trained implies they are good pets.

Again it says dog or cat not both, it needs to be both.

c) For all xx, dog(true) and cat(true), are well trained so good pets.

I believe more in c) than in a) or b) or d) because says that both dog and 
cat are well trained and therefore good pets and for all xx means 'every' so
= Every dog and cat who is well trained is a good pet.

d) For all xx and yy, dog(x-true) and cat(y-true), dog well trained means good pet.

That means:every dog and every cat, and dog who's well trained means good
pet, because the implication is true only for all xx and cat is not x is y.
So cat is not included in the implication (→)

I'm pretty sure is answer c).

b) does not groups cats and dogs. It says that either a cat or a dog is well trained so is a good pet. The way I read it is: Every dog or cat who is well trained is a good pet.

The way I read it:

a) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), good pets imply well trained.

The answers needs that both dog and cat are true, since there is or means that both
don't need to be true at the same time.

b) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), is well trained implies they are good pets.

Again it says dog or cat not both, it needs to be both.

c) For all xx, dog(true) and cat(true), are well trained so good pets.

I believe more in c) than in a) or b) or d) because says that both dog and 
cat are well trained and therefore good pets and for all xx means 'every' so
= Every dog and cat who is well trained is a good pet.

d) For all xx and yy, dog(x-true) and cat(y-true), dog well trained means good pet.

That means:every dog and every cat, and dog who's well trained means good
pet, because the implication is true only for all xx and cat is not x is y.
So cat is not included in the implication (→)

I'm pretty sure is answer c).

b) does not groups cats and dogs. It says that either a cat or a dog is well trained so is a good pet. The way I read it is: Every dog or cat who is well trained is a good pet.

A | B | A and B A | B | A or B

T | T | T T | T | T

T | F | F T | F | T

F | T | F F | T | T

F | F | F F | F | F

As you can see, when conjuncting A, B(A and B) is only true if both prepositions are true. When disjuncting A, B(A or B) is true if both are true or if one of them is true. So what can you interpret from the question? Every dog and cat who's well trained is a good pet. Do you think it needs to be both cat and dog for the sentence to become true or just one of them to sentence be true?

The way I read it:

a) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), good pets imply well trained.

The answers needs that both dog and cat are true, since there is or means that both
don't need to be true at the same time.

b) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), is well trained implies they are good pets.

Again it says dog or cat not both, it needs to be both.

c) For all xx, dog(true) and cat(true), are well trained so good pets.

I believe more in c) than in a) or b) or d) because says that both dog and 
cat are well trained and therefore good pets and for all xx means 'every' so
= Every dog and cat who is well trained is a good pet.

d) For all xx and yy, dog(x-true) and cat(y-true), dog well trained means good pet.

That means:every dog and every cat, and dog who's well trained means good
pet, because the implication is true only for all xx and cat is not x is y.
So cat is not included in the implication (→)

I'm pretty sure is answer c).

b) does not groups cats and dogs. It says that either a cat or a dog is well trained so is a good pet. The way I read it is: Every dog or cat who is well trained is a good pet.

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The way I read it:

a) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), good pets imply well trained.

The answers needs that both dog and cat are true, since there is or means that both
don't need to be true at the same time.

b) For all xx, dog(true) or cat(true), is well trained implies they are good pets.

Again it says dog or cat not both, it needs to be both.

c) For all xx, dog(true) and cat(true), are well trained so good pets.

I believe more in c) than in a) or b) or d) because says that both dog and 
cat are well trained and therefore good pets and for all xx means 'every' so
= Every dog and cat who is well trained is a good pet.

d) For all xx and yy, dog(x-true) and cat(y-true), dog well trained means good pet.

That means:every dog and every cat, and dog who's well trained means good
pet, because the implication is true only for all xx and cat is not x is y.
So cat is not included in the implication (→)

I'm pretty sure is answer c).

b) does not groups cats and dogs. It says that either a cat or a dog is well trained so is a good pet. The way I read it is: Every dog or cat who is well trained is a good pet.