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Richard Feynman explains Quantum Electrodynamics in a wonderful non-technical series of lectures: QED: Photons -- Corpuscles of Light.

QED is a theory which describes how light and matter interact.

It naturally includes no metaphysics, but it does in my opinion include a lot of philosophy.

At one point in the lectures he offers his interpretation that positrons may be electrons that as result of an interaction did not only change direction in space, but also in time — that is, they are electrons travelling back in time.

There is also a good exposition of special relativity by the philosopher of science Tim Maudlin in his book: Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity: Metaphysical Intimations of Modern Physics. That book is worth its weight in gold for its explanation of Bell's theorem.

And if you can handle a little physics, Feynman's lectures are a mind blowing source, for he could not help but teach physics with a ton of philosophy, intuitions and clarity.

Richard Feynman explains Quantum Electrodynamics in a wonderful non-technical series of lectures: QED: Photons -- Corpuscles of Light.

QED is a theory which describes how light and matter interact.

It naturally includes no metaphysics, but it does in my opinion include a lot of philosophy.

At one point in the lectures he offers his interpretation that positrons may be electrons that as result of an interaction did not only change direction in space, but also in time — that is, they are electrons travelling back in time.

Richard Feynman explains Quantum Electrodynamics in a wonderful non-technical series of lectures: QED: Photons -- Corpuscles of Light.

QED is a theory which describes how light and matter interact.

It naturally includes no metaphysics, but it does in my opinion include a lot of philosophy.

At one point in the lectures he offers his interpretation that positrons may be electrons that as result of an interaction did not only change direction in space, but also in time — that is, they are electrons travelling back in time.

There is also a good exposition of special relativity by the philosopher of science Tim Maudlin in his book: Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity: Metaphysical Intimations of Modern Physics. That book is worth its weight in gold for its explanation of Bell's theorem.

And if you can handle a little physics, Feynman's lectures are a mind blowing source, for he could not help but teach physics with a ton of philosophy, intuitions and clarity.

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source | link

Richard Feynman explains Quantum Electrodynamics in a wonderful non-technical series of lectures: QED: Photons -- Corpuscles of Light.

QED is a theory which describes how light and matter interact.

It naturally includes no metaphysics, but it does in my opinion include a lot of philosophy.

At one point in the lectures he offers his interpretation that positrons may be electrons that as result of an interaction did not only change direction in space, but also in time — that is, they are electrons travelling back in time.