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I certainly agree with @User259242 that you yourself describe something of what Kant means.

To get a good grasp of Kant's concepts of space and time is really quite difficult. He differentiates between concepts, intuitions, representation, and much more, in very precise, elaborate, and sometimes overlapping terminology.

To begin with, everything appearing to consciousness is a representation. What of? Of "things-in-themselves," as he calls them, which can never be directly "present" to us or "immediately" known. So Kant judges that something indeed exists "independent of" the mind, setting its limits. But obviously the mind can never "know" this side of things... things as they "really" are "when minds aren't around," so to speak.

The closest we get to some immediate or "unmediated" idea of things is the sensory "intuition" of something. For example, we "see" something.: A waterfall. But of course we can only see it or "make sense of it" through the elaborate structure of our eyes. So the waterfall is already "represented." By"represented": by our eyes. But, but also by a whole structure of "intuitions" and formal "concepts." The same for every sensibly intuited thing. The waterfall is "synthesized" out of this portfolio of representations.

(Note: Kant does not mean this in the psychological sense of constructions of "neurons" or "instincts," which only begs the question of what these "things" are. He is trying to infer the logical conditions for the very possibility of any "experience." By carefully analyzing experiences or appearances, he attempts to deduce what must already be entailed for all of them to be possible. Hence a priori, or what is prior to the experience or a priori.)

Now, Kant identifies a number of primary, irreducible concepts such(such as "substance" and "cause") that must always already be part of an experience. He calls these "categorical" concepts or "categories." We might say that "space" and "time" are among these irreducible categories. But, in fact, it is a little more difficult than that. Space and time are even more fundamental.

Kant argues that we cannot conceive of any object without thinking of it "outside" of us "in" space, for example. Yet we can, sort of, think of space without things "in" it.: Pure "outer space." Thus space cannot be abstracted from the empirical idea of "things." We"things"; we cannot start with "things," then imagine "space." Instead, things are "represented," mediated, and formed through spatialization. indeed,: the empirical theory that ideas are all caused by sensations "from outside" presupposes this "outside."

So space and time are the very deepest "forms" of the very possibility of anything "appearing" to us. Personally, I tend to picture them as the (0,0) "origin("origin point") of a Cartesian grid that opens up into the coordinate system in which everything can appear and also be measured. I can only repeat, Kant is not easy. He is attempting to restructure the modern view of mind to resolve problems with Descartes' rationalism, Hume's empiricism, Newtonian determinism, Enlightenment freedom, and more. So don't be discouraged if it seems hard to "get."

I certainly agree with @User259242 that you yourself describe something of what Kant means.

To get a good grasp of Kant's concepts of space and time is really quite difficult. He differentiates between concepts, intuitions, representation, and much more, in very precise, elaborate, and sometimes overlapping terminology.

To begin with, everything appearing to consciousness is a representation. What of? Of "things-in-themselves," as he calls them, which can never be directly "present" to us or "immediately" known. So Kant judges that something indeed exists "independent of" the mind, setting its limits. But obviously the mind can never "know" this side of things... things as they "really" are "when minds aren't around," so to speak.

The closest we get to some immediate or "unmediated" idea of things is the sensory "intuition" of something. For example, we "see" something. A waterfall. But of course we can only see it or "make sense of it" through the elaborate structure of our eyes. So the waterfall is already "represented." By our eyes. But also by a whole structure of "intuitions" and formal "concepts." The same for every sensibly intuited thing. The waterfall is "synthesized" out of this portfolio of representations.

(Note: Kant does not mean this in the psychological sense of constructions of "neurons" or "instincts," which only begs the question of what these "things" are. He is trying to infer the logical conditions for the very possibility of any "experience." By carefully analyzing experiences or appearances, he attempts to deduce what must already be entailed for all of them to be possible. Hence what is prior to the experience or a priori.)

Now, Kant identifies a number of primary, irreducible concepts such as "substance" and "cause") that must always already be part of an experience. He calls these "categorical" concepts or "categories." We might say that "space" and "time" are among these irreducible categories. But, in fact, it is a little more difficult than that. Space and time are even more fundamental.

Kant argues that we cannot conceive of any object without thinking of it "outside" of us "in" space, for example. Yet we can, sort of, think of space without things "in" it. Pure "outer space." Thus space cannot be abstracted from the empirical idea of "things." We cannot start with "things," then imagine "space." Instead, things are "represented," mediated, and formed through spatialization. indeed, the empirical theory that ideas are all caused by sensations "from outside" presupposes this "outside."

So space and time are the very deepest "forms" of the very possibility of anything "appearing" to us. Personally, I tend to picture them as the (0,0) "origin point" of a Cartesian grid that opens up into the coordinate system in which everything can appear and also be measured. I can only repeat, Kant is not easy. He is attempting to restructure the modern view of mind to resolve problems with Descartes' rationalism, Hume's empiricism, Newtonian determinism, Enlightenment freedom, and more. So don't be discouraged if it seems hard to "get."

I certainly agree with @User259242 that you yourself describe something of what Kant means.

To get a good grasp of Kant's concepts of space and time is really quite difficult. He differentiates between concepts, intuitions, representation, and much more, in very precise, elaborate, and sometimes overlapping terminology.

To begin with, everything appearing to consciousness is a representation. What of? Of "things-in-themselves," as he calls them, which can never be directly "present" to us or "immediately" known. So Kant judges that something indeed exists "independent of" the mind, setting its limits. But obviously the mind can never "know" this side of things... things as they "really" are "when minds aren't around," so to speak.

The closest we get to some immediate or "unmediated" idea of things is the sensory "intuition" of something. For example, we "see" something: A waterfall. But of course we can only see it or "make sense of it" through the elaborate structure of our eyes. So the waterfall is already "represented": by our eyes, but also by a whole structure of "intuitions" and formal "concepts." The same for every sensibly intuited thing. The waterfall is "synthesized" out of this portfolio of representations.

(Note: Kant does not mean this in the psychological sense of constructions of "neurons" or "instincts," which only begs the question of what these "things" are. He is trying to infer the logical conditions for the very possibility of any "experience." By carefully analyzing experiences or appearances, he attempts to deduce what must already be entailed for all of them to be possible. Hence a priori, or what is prior to the experience.)

Now, Kant identifies a number of primary, irreducible concepts (such as "substance" and "cause") that must always already be part of an experience. He calls these "categorical" concepts or "categories." We might say that "space" and "time" are among these irreducible categories. But, in fact, it is a little more difficult than that. Space and time are even more fundamental.

Kant argues that we cannot conceive of any object without thinking of it "outside" of us "in" space, for example. Yet we can, sort of, think of space without things "in" it: Pure "outer space." Thus space cannot be abstracted from the empirical idea of "things"; we cannot start with "things," then imagine "space." Instead, things are "represented," mediated, and formed through spatialization: the empirical theory that ideas are all caused by sensations "from outside" presupposes this "outside."

So space and time are the very deepest "forms" of the very possibility of anything "appearing" to us. Personally, I tend to picture them as the (0,0) ("origin point") of a Cartesian grid that opens up into the coordinate system in which everything can appear and also be measured. I can only repeat, Kant is not easy. He is attempting to restructure the modern view of mind to resolve problems with Descartes' rationalism, Hume's empiricism, Newtonian determinism, Enlightenment freedom, and more. So don't be discouraged if it seems hard to "get."

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I certainly agree with @User259242 that you yourself describe something of what Kant means.

To get a good grasp of Kant's concepts of space and time is really quite difficult. He differentiates between concepts, intuitions, representation, and much more, in very precise, elaborate, and sometimes overlapping terminology.

To begin with, everything appearing to consciousness is a representation. What of? Of "things-in-themselves," as he calls them, which can never be directly "present" to us or "immediately" known. So Kant judges that something indeed exists "independent of" the mind, setting its limits. But obviously the mind can never "know" this side of things... things as they "really" are "when minds aren't around," so to speak.

The closest we get to some immediate or "unmediated" idea of things is the sensory "intuition" of something. For example, we "see" something. A waterfall. But of course we can only see it or "make sense of it" through the elaborate structure of our eyes. So the waterfall is already "represented." By our eyes. But also by a whole structure of "intuitions" and formal "concepts." The same for every sensibly intuited thing. The waterfall is "synthesized" out of this portfolio of representations.

(Note: Kant does not mean this in the psychological sense of constructions of "neurons" or "instincts," which only begs the question of what these "things" are. He is trying to infer the logical conditions for the very possibility of any "experience." By carefully analyzing experiences or appearances, he attempts to deduce what must already be entailed for all of them to be possible. Hence what is prior to the experience or a priori.)

Now, Kant identifies a number of primary, irreducible concepts such as "substance" and "cause") that must always already be part of an experience. He calls these "categorical" concepts or "categories." We might say that "space" and "time" are among these irreducible categories. But, in fact, it is a little more difficult than that. Space and time are even more fundamental.

Kant argues that we cannot conceive of any object without thinking of it "outside" of us "in" space, for example. Yet we can, sort of, think of space without things "in" it. Pure "outer space." Thus space cannot be abstracted from the empirical idea of "things." We cannot start with "things," then imagine "space." Instead, things are "represented," mediated, and formed through spatialization. indeed, the empirical theory that ideas are all caused by sensations "from outside" presupposes this "outside."

So space and time are the very deepest "forms" of the very possibility of anything "appearing" to us. Personally, I tend to picture them as the (0,0) "origin point" of a Cartesian grid that opens up into the coordinate system in which everything can appear and also be measured. I can only repeat, Kant is not easy. He is attempting to restructure the modern view of mind to resolve problems with Descartes' rationalism, Hume's empiricism, Newtonian determinism, Enlightenment freedom, and more. So don't be discouraged if it seems hard to "get."