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'The Question concerning Technology' whilst the title of a famous essay by Heidegger, is also a question already raised in Platos Phaedrus when he writes on Theuth, the ancient Egyption god of Naucratis' who

invented numbers and arithmetic, geometry and astronomy, also draughts and dice, and most importantly letters

By letters he means writing; as onin the term, 'a man of letters'; Socrates raises the question

We still have to speak of the propriety and impropriety of writing; how it should be done and how it is improper

It is not an unmixed good - as most goods are; as Theuth, the god of technology noted; for he

enumerated their uses [of his inventions] and expressed praise or blame, according as he approved or disapproved.

But for writing, his enthusiasm overcame and over leapt his usual caution; when describing it to his king, 'the god Thamus, who lived in the great city of the upper region called by the Greeks, Thebes' and who they themselves called Amun 'Lord of the silent'

This invention, O King, will make the Egyptians wiser and will improve their memories; for it is an elixir of memory and wisdom that I have discovered.

Thamus, whilst praising the inventiveness of the most 'ingenious Theuth' reminds him to be cautious for

one man has the ability to beget arts, but the ability to judge of their usefulness and harmfulness belongs to another.

Amun, being the king of his people, had to look towards the whole, whereas Theuth 'being the father of letters', can only be partial and as Amun says to him directly

havehad been led by your affection to ascribe to them a power the opposite to what they really possess. For this invention will produce forgetfulness in the minds of those who learn to use it, because they will not practise their memories. Their trust in writing produced by external characters in no way part of themselves, will discourage the use of their own memory within within them.

He adds:

You have not invented an elixir of memory, but of reminding; and you offer your pupils the appearance of wisdom, and not true wisdom; for they will read many things without instruction and will therefore seem to know many things, when they are for the most part ignorant, and hard to get along with, since they are not wise, only appear wise.

You have not invented an elixir of memory, but of reminding; and you offer your pupils the appearance of wisdom, and not true wisdom; for they will read many things without instruction and will therefore seem to know many things, when they are for the most part ignorant, and hard to get along with, since they are not wise, only appear wise.

ThisAppearence - as in Heideggers seeming; this, then is the beginning of the critique of technology and not criticism which is pejorative and only damns; technology which Arendt commented was the only real revolution in our times.

'The Question concerning Technology' whilst the title of a famous essay by Heidegger, is also a question already raised in Platos Phaedrus when he writes on Theuth, the ancient Egyption god of Naucratis' who

invented numbers and arithmetic, geometry and astronomy, also draughts and dice, and most importantly letters

By letters he means writing; as on the term, 'a man of letters'; Socrates raises the question

We still have to speak of the propriety and impropriety of writing; how it should be done and how it is improper

It is not an unmixed good - as most goods are; as Theuth, the god of technology noted; for he

enumerated their uses [of his inventions] and expressed praise or blame, according as he approved or disapproved.

But for writing, his enthusiasm overcame and over leapt his usual caution; when describing it to his king, 'the god Thamus, who lived in the great city of the upper region called by the Greeks, Thebes' and who they themselves called Amun 'Lord of the silent'

This invention, O King, will make the Egyptians wiser and will improve their memories; for it is an elixir of memory and wisdom that I have discovered.

Thamus, whilst praising the inventiveness of the most 'ingenious Theuth' reminds him to be cautious for

one man has the ability to beget arts, but the ability to judge of their usefulness and harmfulness belongs to another.

Amun, being the king of his people, had to look towards the whole, whereas Theuth 'being the father of letters'

have been led by your affection to ascribe to them a power the opposite to what they really possess. For this invention will produce forgetfulness in the minds of those who learn to use it, because they will not practise their memories. Their trust in writing produced by external characters in no way part of themselves, will discourage the use of their own memory within within them.

He adds:

You have not invented an elixir of memory, but of reminding; and you offer your pupils the appearance of wisdom, and not true wisdom; for they will read many things without instruction and will therefore seem to know many things, when they are for the most part ignorant, and hard to get along with, since they are not wise, only appear wise.

This, then is the beginning of the critique of technology and not criticism which is pejorative and only damns; technology which Arendt commented was the only real revolution in our times.

'The Question concerning Technology' whilst the title of a famous essay by Heidegger, is also a question already raised in Platos Phaedrus when he writes on Theuth, the ancient Egyption god of Naucratis' who

invented numbers and arithmetic, geometry and astronomy, also draughts and dice, and most importantly letters

By letters he means writing; as in the term, 'a man of letters'; Socrates raises the question

We still have to speak of the propriety and impropriety of writing; how it should be done and how it is improper

It is not an unmixed good - as most goods are; as Theuth, the god of technology noted; for he

enumerated their uses [of his inventions] and expressed praise or blame, according as he approved or disapproved.

But for writing, his enthusiasm overcame and over leapt his usual caution; when describing it to his king, 'the god Thamus, who lived in the great city of the upper region called by the Greeks, Thebes' and who they themselves called Amun 'Lord of the silent'

This invention, O King, will make the Egyptians wiser and will improve their memories; for it is an elixir of memory and wisdom that I have discovered.

Thamus, whilst praising the inventiveness of the most 'ingenious Theuth' reminds him to be cautious for

one man has the ability to beget arts, but the ability to judge of their usefulness and harmfulness belongs to another.

Amun, being the king of his people, had to look towards the whole, whereas Theuth 'being the father of letters', can only be partial and as Amun says to him directly

had been led by your affection to ascribe to them a power the opposite to what they really possess. For this invention will produce forgetfulness in the minds of those who learn to use it, because they will not practise their memories. Their trust in writing produced by external characters in no way part of themselves, will discourage the use of their own memory within within them.

He adds:

You have not invented an elixir of memory, but of reminding; and you offer your pupils the appearance of wisdom, and not true wisdom; for they will read many things without instruction and will therefore seem to know many things, when they are for the most part ignorant, and hard to get along with, since they are not wise, only appear wise.

Appearence - as in Heideggers seeming; this, then is the beginning of the critique of technology and not criticism which is pejorative and only damns; technology which Arendt commented was the only real revolution in our times.

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source | link

'The Question concerning Technology' whilst the title of a famous essay by Heidegger, is also a question already raised in Platos Phaedrus when he writes on Theuth, the ancient Egyption god of Naucratis' who

invented numbers and arithmetic, geometry and astronomy, also draughts and dice, and most importantly letters

By letters he means writing; as on the term, 'a man of letters'; Socrates raises the question

We still have to speak of the propriety and impropriety of writing; how it should be done and how it is improper

It is not an unmixed good - as most goods are; as Theuth, the god of technology noted; for he

enumerated their uses [of his inventions] and expressed praise or blame, according as he approved or disapproved.

But for writing, his enthusiasm overcame and over leapt his usual caution; when describing it to his king, 'the god Thamus, who lived in the great city of the upper region called by the Greeks, Thebes' and who they themselves called Amun 'Lord of the silent'

This invention, O King, will make the Egyptians wiser and will improve their memories; for it is an elixir of memory and wisdom that I have discovered.

Thamus, whilst praising the inventiveness of the most 'ingenious Theuth' reminds him to be cautious for

one man has the ability to beget arts, but the ability to judge of their usefulness and harmfulness belongs to another.

Amun, being the king of his people, had to look towards the whole, whereas Theuth 'being the father of letters'

have been led by your affection to ascribe to them a power the opposite to what they really possess. For this invention will produce forgetfulness in the minds of those who learn to use it, because they will not practise their memories. Their trust in writing produced by external characters in no way part of themselves, will discourage the use of their own memory within within them.

He adds:

You have not invented an elixir of memory, but of reminding; and you offer your pupils the appearance of wisdom, and not true wisdom; for they will read many things without instruction and will therefore seem to know many things, when they are for the most part ignorant, and hard to get along with, since they are not wise, only appear wise.

This, then is the beginning of the critique of technology and not criticism which is pejorative and only damns; technology which Arendt commented was the only real revolution in our times.