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I liked Fritjof Capras The Tao of Physics which ties physics to eastern philosophy, the Tao.

Michael Serres The Birth of Physics riffs off Epicurean physics on the notion of the aleatory and indiscernable clinamen; and he writes in the grand French manner.

Sorabjis *Space, time & matter scholarly in the best tradition and he writes here of physics or rather natural philosophy in late antiquity, though

his interests and competence reach far beyond late antiquity in both directions, reaching as far back to Anaxagoras and forward to Einstein...the book is divided into three parts, per the title; especially in the first part, Sorabji draws connections between the ancient ideas and those of modern relativity and quantum mechanics - a procedure fraught with peril, but one which Sorabji, for the most part, brings off successfully.

There's also Rubensteins Worlds without End an intellectual genealogy of the concept of the mutiverse.

I liked Fritjof Capras The Tao of Physics which ties physics to eastern philosophy, the Tao.

Michael Serres The Birth of Physics riffs off Epicurean physics on the notion of the aleatory and indiscernable clinamen; and he writes in the grand French manner.

Sorabjis *Space, time & matter scholarly in the best tradition and he writes here of physics or rather natural philosophy in late antiquity, though

his interests and competence reach far beyond late antiquity in both directions, reaching as far back to Anaxagoras and forward to Einstein...the book is divided into three parts, per the title; especially in the first part, Sorabji draws connections between the ancient ideas and those of modern relativity and quantum mechanics - a procedure fraught with peril, but one which Sorabji, for the most part, brings off successfully.

I liked Fritjof Capras The Tao of Physics which ties physics to eastern philosophy, the Tao.

Michael Serres The Birth of Physics riffs off Epicurean physics on the notion of the aleatory and indiscernable clinamen; and he writes in the grand French manner.

Sorabjis *Space, time & matter scholarly in the best tradition and he writes here of physics or rather natural philosophy in late antiquity, though

his interests and competence reach far beyond late antiquity in both directions, reaching as far back to Anaxagoras and forward to Einstein...the book is divided into three parts, per the title; especially in the first part, Sorabji draws connections between the ancient ideas and those of modern relativity and quantum mechanics - a procedure fraught with peril, but one which Sorabji, for the most part, brings off successfully.

There's also Rubensteins Worlds without End an intellectual genealogy of the concept of the mutiverse.

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source | link

I liked Fritjof Capras The Tao of Physics which ties physics to eastern philosophy, the Tao.

Michael Serres The Birth of Physics riffs off Epicurean physics on the notion of the aleatory and indiscernable clinamen; and he writes in the grand French manner.

Sorabjis *Space, time & matter scholarly in the best tradition and he writes here of physics or rather natural philosophy in late antiquity, though

his interests and competence reach far beyond late antiquity in both directions, reaching as far back to Anaxagoras and forward to Einstein...the book is divided into three parts, per the title; especially in the first part, Sorabji draws connections between the ancient ideas and those of modern relativity and quantum mechanics - a procedure fraught with peril, but one which Sorabji, for the most part, brings off successfully.