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One answer is suggested in this book:

For Kofman the spider's web... [is a] metaphor for philosophical scientific and theological system-building... [as] a narcissistic illusion... [with] the pleasure of the spider's recognition of the "objectivity" of a world which it has created itself... the play of becoming has the poisonous consequence of precluding those who are entangled in this web from engaging further in creative activity... nihilistic will... from life and the sensible world of becoming toward the abstract intelligible world of static essences.

Kant's categorical imperative is similarly attacked, in the Gay Science, for the "impersonality" (Richard John White) of its imperative:

enter image description here

It seems that, for White, Nietzsche is concerned with individual sovereignty, not the fulfillment of our supposed rational nature (as for Kant): but the recognition that our judgments of value (and here is my own guesswork) areis created by and sustainsustains our individual will.

i.e. there are no standards of judgment beside sovereignty:

the fulfillment of the individual as such.

White p42 -- Nietzsche and the problem of sovereignty

One answer is suggested in this book:

For Kofman the spider's web... [is a] metaphor for philosophical scientific and theological system-building... [as] a narcissistic illusion... [with] the pleasure of the spider's recognition of the "objectivity" of a world which it has created itself... the play of becoming has the poisonous consequence of precluding those who are entangled in this web from engaging further in creative activity... nihilistic will... from life and the sensible world of becoming toward the abstract intelligible world of static essences.

Kant's categorical imperative is similarly attacked, in the Gay Science, for the "impersonality" (Richard John White) of its imperative:

enter image description here

It seems that, for White, Nietzsche is concerned with individual sovereignty, not the fulfillment of our supposed rational nature (as for Kant): but the recognition that our judgments of value (and here is my own guesswork) are created by and sustain our individual will.

i.e. there are no standards of judgment beside sovereignty:

the fulfillment of the individual as such.

White p42 -- Nietzsche and the problem of sovereignty

One answer is suggested in this book:

For Kofman the spider's web... [is a] metaphor for philosophical scientific and theological system-building... [as] a narcissistic illusion... [with] the pleasure of the spider's recognition of the "objectivity" of a world which it has created itself... the play of becoming has the poisonous consequence of precluding those who are entangled in this web from engaging further in creative activity... nihilistic will... from life and the sensible world of becoming toward the abstract intelligible world of static essences.

Kant's categorical imperative is similarly attacked, in the Gay Science, for the "impersonality" (Richard John White) of its imperative:

enter image description here

It seems that, for White, Nietzsche is concerned with individual sovereignty, not the fulfillment of our supposed rational nature (as for Kant): but the recognition that value (and here is my own guesswork) is created by and sustains our individual will.

i.e. there are no standards of judgment beside sovereignty:

the fulfillment of the individual as such.

White p42 -- Nietzsche and the problem of sovereignty

1
source | link

One answer is suggested in this book:

For Kofman the spider's web... [is a] metaphor for philosophical scientific and theological system-building... [as] a narcissistic illusion... [with] the pleasure of the spider's recognition of the "objectivity" of a world which it has created itself... the play of becoming has the poisonous consequence of precluding those who are entangled in this web from engaging further in creative activity... nihilistic will... from life and the sensible world of becoming toward the abstract intelligible world of static essences.

Kant's categorical imperative is similarly attacked, in the Gay Science, for the "impersonality" (Richard John White) of its imperative:

enter image description here

It seems that, for White, Nietzsche is concerned with individual sovereignty, not the fulfillment of our supposed rational nature (as for Kant): but the recognition that our judgments of value (and here is my own guesswork) are created by and sustain our individual will.

i.e. there are no standards of judgment beside sovereignty:

the fulfillment of the individual as such.

White p42 -- Nietzsche and the problem of sovereignty