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1) The famous logician Kurt Goedel left behind a formalized "proof" for the ontological argument of Anselm of Canterbury.

Anselm gave a "proof" that the term "a being than which none greater can be conceived" must refer to some existing being, i.e., that there must exist a being than which none greater can be conceived.

See the following lecture by the logician Brendel for a formalization of Goedels "proof"

http://wwwmath.uni-muenster.de/logik/Veranstaltungen/cl2010/slides/brendel.pdf

It closes with a critical assessment of what Goedel's formalization proveproves and what it does not prove.

2) You may also read Gettier's presentation of the "Gettier example" in

http://www.ditext.com/gettier/gettier.html

The Gettier example is considered a counter-example against a widely hold definition of knowlegde as justified true belief. Gettier's formalization is not so extensive like Goedel's argument.

1) The famous logician Kurt Goedel left behind a formalized "proof" for the ontological argument of Anselm of Canterbury.

Anselm gave a "proof" that the term "a being than which none greater can be conceived" must refer to some existing being, i.e., that there must exist a being than which none greater can be conceived.

See the following lecture by the logician Brendel for a formalization of Goedels "proof"

http://wwwmath.uni-muenster.de/logik/Veranstaltungen/cl2010/slides/brendel.pdf

It closes with a critical assessment of what Goedel's formalization prove and what it does not prove.

2) You may also read Gettier's presentation of the "Gettier example" in

http://www.ditext.com/gettier/gettier.html

The Gettier example is considered a counter-example against a widely hold definition of knowlegde as justified true belief. Gettier's formalization is not so extensive like Goedel's argument.

1) The famous logician Kurt Goedel left behind a formalized "proof" for the ontological argument of Anselm of Canterbury.

Anselm gave a "proof" that the term "a being than which none greater can be conceived" must refer to some existing being, i.e., that there must exist a being than which none greater can be conceived.

See the following lecture by the logician Brendel for a formalization of Goedels "proof"

http://wwwmath.uni-muenster.de/logik/Veranstaltungen/cl2010/slides/brendel.pdf

It closes with a critical assessment of what Goedel's formalization proves and what it does not prove.

2) You may also read Gettier's presentation of the "Gettier example" in

http://www.ditext.com/gettier/gettier.html

The Gettier example is considered a counter-example against a widely hold definition of knowlegde as justified true belief. Gettier's formalization is not so extensive like Goedel's argument.

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1) The famous logician Kurt Goedel left behind a formalized "proof" for the ontological argument of Anselm of Canterbury.

Anselm gave a "proof" that the term "a being than which none greater can be conceived" must refer to some existing being, i.e., that there must exist a being than which none greater can be conceived.

See the following lecture by tjethe logician Brendel for a formalization of Goedels "proof"

http://wwwmath.uni-muenster.de/logik/Veranstaltungen/cl2010/slides/brendel.pdf

It closes with a critical assessment of what Goedel's formalization prove and what it does not prove.

2) You may also read Gettier's presentation of the "Gettier example" in

http://www.ditext.com/gettier/gettier.html

The Gettier example is considered a counter-example against a widely hold definition of knowlegde as justified true belief. Gettier's formalization is not so extensive like Goedel's argument.

1) The famous logician Kurt Goedel left behind a formalized "proof" for the ontological argument of Anselm of Canterbury.

Anselm gave a "proof" that the term "a being than which none greater can be conceived" must refer to some existing being, i.e., that there must exist a being than which none greater can be conceived.

See the following lecture by tje logician Brendel for a formalization of Goedels "proof"

http://wwwmath.uni-muenster.de/logik/Veranstaltungen/cl2010/slides/brendel.pdf

It closes with a critical assessment of what Goedel's formalization prove and what it does not prove.

2) You may also read Gettier's presentation of the "Gettier example" in

http://www.ditext.com/gettier/gettier.html

The Gettier example is considered a counter-example against a widely hold definition of knowlegde as justified true belief. Gettier's formalization is not so extensive like Goedel's argument.

1) The famous logician Kurt Goedel left behind a formalized "proof" for the ontological argument of Anselm of Canterbury.

Anselm gave a "proof" that the term "a being than which none greater can be conceived" must refer to some existing being, i.e., that there must exist a being than which none greater can be conceived.

See the following lecture by the logician Brendel for a formalization of Goedels "proof"

http://wwwmath.uni-muenster.de/logik/Veranstaltungen/cl2010/slides/brendel.pdf

It closes with a critical assessment of what Goedel's formalization prove and what it does not prove.

2) You may also read Gettier's presentation of the "Gettier example" in

http://www.ditext.com/gettier/gettier.html

The Gettier example is considered a counter-example against a widely hold definition of knowlegde as justified true belief. Gettier's formalization is not so extensive like Goedel's argument.

3 Gettier example added
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1) The famous logician Kurt Goedel left behind a formalized "proof" for the ontological argument of Anselm of Canterbury.

Anselm gave a "proof" that the term "a being than which none greater can be conceived" must refer to some existing being, i.e., that there must exist a being than which none greater can be conceived.

See the following lecture by tje logician Brendel for a formalization of Goedels "proof"

http://wwwmath.uni-muenster.de/logik/Veranstaltungen/cl2010/slides/brendel.pdf

It closes with a critical assessment of what Goedel's formalization prove and what it does not prove.

2) You may also read Gettier's presentation of the "Gettier example" in

http://www.ditext.com/gettier/gettier.html

The Gettier example is considered a counter-example against a widely hold definition of knowlegde as justified true belief. Gettier's formalization is not so extensive like Goedel's argument.

The famous logician Kurt Goedel left behind a formalized "proof" for the ontological argument of Anselm of Canterbury.

Anselm gave a "proof" that the term "a being than which none greater can be conceived" must refer to some existing being, i.e., that there must exist a being than which none greater can be conceived.

See the following lecture by tje logician Brendel for a formalization of Goedels "proof"

http://wwwmath.uni-muenster.de/logik/Veranstaltungen/cl2010/slides/brendel.pdf

It closes with a critical assessment of what Goedel's formalization prove and what it does not prove.

1) The famous logician Kurt Goedel left behind a formalized "proof" for the ontological argument of Anselm of Canterbury.

Anselm gave a "proof" that the term "a being than which none greater can be conceived" must refer to some existing being, i.e., that there must exist a being than which none greater can be conceived.

See the following lecture by tje logician Brendel for a formalization of Goedels "proof"

http://wwwmath.uni-muenster.de/logik/Veranstaltungen/cl2010/slides/brendel.pdf

It closes with a critical assessment of what Goedel's formalization prove and what it does not prove.

2) You may also read Gettier's presentation of the "Gettier example" in

http://www.ditext.com/gettier/gettier.html

The Gettier example is considered a counter-example against a widely hold definition of knowlegde as justified true belief. Gettier's formalization is not so extensive like Goedel's argument.

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