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Within philosophy, is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

In a comment under this questionthis question Jon Ericson suggested a case could be made for "reason" to include "logic" but not vice-versa. I had always had a not-thought-out impression that that is so. Reason might perhaps include the formation of concepts and some norms by which one decides which new concepts are worthwhile. Logic, on the other hand, might only tell us that our definitions of new concepts must not be circular or ambiguous, etc.

Within philosophy, is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

In a comment under this question Jon Ericson suggested a case could be made for "reason" to include "logic" but not vice-versa. I had always had a not-thought-out impression that that is so. Reason might perhaps include the formation of concepts and some norms by which one decides which new concepts are worthwhile. Logic, on the other hand, might only tell us that our definitions of new concepts must not be circular or ambiguous, etc.

Within philosophy, is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

In a comment under this question Jon Ericson suggested a case could be made for "reason" to include "logic" but not vice-versa. I had always had a not-thought-out impression that that is so. Reason might perhaps include the formation of concepts and some norms by which one decides which new concepts are worthwhile. Logic, on the other hand, might only tell us that our definitions of new concepts must not be circular or ambiguous, etc.

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Is Within philosophy, is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

IsWithin philosophy, is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

In a comment under this question Jon Ericson suggested a case could be made for "reason" to include "logic" but not vice-versa. I had always had a not-thought-out impression that that is so. Reason might perhaps include the formation of concepts and some norms by which one decides which new concepts are worthwhile. Logic, on the other hand, might only tell us that our definitions of new concepts must not be circular or ambiguous, etc.

Is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

Is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

In a comment under this question Jon Ericson suggested a case could be made for "reason" to include "logic" but not vice-versa. I had always had a not-thought-out impression that that is so. Reason might perhaps include the formation of concepts and some norms by which one decides which new concepts are worthwhile. Logic, on the other hand, might only tell us that our definitions of new concepts must not be circular or ambiguous, etc.

Within philosophy, is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

Within philosophy, is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

In a comment under this question Jon Ericson suggested a case could be made for "reason" to include "logic" but not vice-versa. I had always had a not-thought-out impression that that is so. Reason might perhaps include the formation of concepts and some norms by which one decides which new concepts are worthwhile. Logic, on the other hand, might only tell us that our definitions of new concepts must not be circular or ambiguous, etc.

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source | link

Is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

Is "reason" a broader concept than "logic"?

In a comment under this question Jon Ericson suggested a case could be made for "reason" to include "logic" but not vice-versa. I had always had a not-thought-out impression that that is so. Reason might perhaps include the formation of concepts and some norms by which one decides which new concepts are worthwhile. Logic, on the other hand, might only tell us that our definitions of new concepts must not be circular or ambiguous, etc.