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Unity is more fundamental than synthesis, since it is a component of the concept of a unified manifold, which is what synthesis brings about. The unity presupposed by synthesis is not the category of unity, because the concept of a category presupposes that of unity as well." (Critique of Pure Reason Lecture Notes: Transcendental Deduction G. J. Mattey)

The first sentence seems unclear to me. How is unity more fundamental than synthesis? The second sentence also is confusing?. What is not the category, "synthesis" or "unity"? My search into the definition of category used by Kant did not help me unravel the puzzle for.

Unity is more fundamental than synthesis, since it is a component of the concept of a unified manifold, which is what synthesis brings about. The unity presupposed by synthesis is not the category of unity, because the concept of a category presupposes that of unity as well." (Critique of Pure Reason Lecture Notes: Transcendental Deduction G. J. Mattey)

The first sentence seems unclear to me. How is unity more fundamental than synthesis? The second sentence also is confusing? What is not the category, "synthesis" or "unity"? My search into the definition of category used by Kant did not help me unravel the puzzle for.

Unity is more fundamental than synthesis, since it is a component of the concept of a unified manifold, which is what synthesis brings about. The unity presupposed by synthesis is not the category of unity, because the concept of a category presupposes that of unity as well. (Critique of Pure Reason Lecture Notes: Transcendental Deduction G. J. Mattey)

The first sentence seems unclear to me. How is unity more fundamental than synthesis? The second sentence also is confusing. What is not the category, "synthesis" or "unity"? My search into the definition of category used by Kant did not help me unravel the puzzle for.

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source | link

"Unity is more fundamental than synthesis, since it is a component of the concept of a unified manifold, which is what synthesis brings about. The unity presupposed by synthesis is not the category of unity, because the concept of a category presupposes that of unity as well." (Critique of Pure Reason Lecture Notes: Transcendental Deduction G. J. Mattey)

Unity is more fundamental than synthesis, since it is a component of the concept of a unified manifold, which is what synthesis brings about. The unity presupposed by synthesis is not the category of unity, because the concept of a category presupposes that of unity as well." (Critique of Pure Reason Lecture Notes: Transcendental Deduction G. J. Mattey)

The first sentence seems unclear to me. How is unity more fundamental than synthesis? The second sentence also is confusing? What is not the category, "synthesis" or "unity"? My search into the definition of category used by Kant did not help me unravel the puzzle for.

"Unity is more fundamental than synthesis, since it is a component of the concept of a unified manifold, which is what synthesis brings about. The unity presupposed by synthesis is not the category of unity, because the concept of a category presupposes that of unity as well." (Critique of Pure Reason Lecture Notes: Transcendental Deduction G. J. Mattey)

The first sentence seems unclear to me. How is unity more fundamental than synthesis? The second sentence also is confusing? What is not the category, "synthesis" or "unity"? My search into the definition of category used by Kant did not help me unravel the puzzle for.

Unity is more fundamental than synthesis, since it is a component of the concept of a unified manifold, which is what synthesis brings about. The unity presupposed by synthesis is not the category of unity, because the concept of a category presupposes that of unity as well." (Critique of Pure Reason Lecture Notes: Transcendental Deduction G. J. Mattey)

The first sentence seems unclear to me. How is unity more fundamental than synthesis? The second sentence also is confusing? What is not the category, "synthesis" or "unity"? My search into the definition of category used by Kant did not help me unravel the puzzle for.

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Unity is more fundamental than synthesis

"Unity is more fundamental than synthesis, since it is a component of the concept of a unified manifold, which is what synthesis brings about. The unity presupposed by synthesis is not the category of unity, because the concept of a category presupposes that of unity as well." (Critique of Pure Reason Lecture Notes: Transcendental Deduction G. J. Mattey)

The first sentence seems unclear to me. How is unity more fundamental than synthesis? The second sentence also is confusing? What is not the category, "synthesis" or "unity"? My search into the definition of category used by Kant did not help me unravel the puzzle for.