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Some comments to your question: 1. Refer to Plato's Timaeus; his view of God and Creation are purely monotheistic. Several thinkers believe that Plato's school of thinking was a precursor to Christianity, and thus proclaims a single, benevolent and ideal superior creature that created the best possible universe. This is all in Timaeus.

  1. Later schools of thought such as the Epicurian, explicitly abolished the concept of fate, or Gods intervening in everyday life. So to single-handedly call the ancients as fate-followers is incorrect.

  2. Christianity (I can assure you on the Orthodox flavor at least) truely believes in fate, to the extent that benevolent God judges our very actions.

  1. Refer to Plato's Timaeus; his view of God and Creation are purely monotheistic. Several thinkers believe that Plato's school of thinking was a precursor to Christianity, and thus proclaims a single, benevolent and ideal superior creature that created the best possible universe. This is all in Timaeus.
  2. Later schools of thought such as the Epicurian, explicitly abolished the concept of fate, or Gods intervening in everyday life. So to single-handedly call the ancients as fate-followers is incorrect.
  3. Christianity (I can assure you on the Orthodox flavor at least) truely believes in fate, to the extent that benevolent God judges our very actions.

Some comments to your question: 1. Refer to Plato's Timaeus; his view of God and Creation are purely monotheistic. Several thinkers believe that Plato's school of thinking was a precursor to Christianity, and thus proclaims a single, benevolent and ideal superior creature that created the best possible universe. This is all in Timaeus.

  1. Later schools of thought such as the Epicurian, explicitly abolished the concept of fate, or Gods intervening in everyday life. So to single-handedly call the ancients as fate-followers is incorrect.

  2. Christianity (I can assure you on the Orthodox flavor at least) truely believes in fate, to the extent that benevolent God judges our very actions.

Some comments to your question:

  1. Refer to Plato's Timaeus; his view of God and Creation are purely monotheistic. Several thinkers believe that Plato's school of thinking was a precursor to Christianity, and thus proclaims a single, benevolent and ideal superior creature that created the best possible universe. This is all in Timaeus.
  2. Later schools of thought such as the Epicurian, explicitly abolished the concept of fate, or Gods intervening in everyday life. So to single-handedly call the ancients as fate-followers is incorrect.
  3. Christianity (I can assure you on the Orthodox flavor at least) truely believes in fate, to the extent that benevolent God judges our very actions.
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source | link

Some comments to your question: 1. Refer to Plato's Timaeus; his view of God and Creation are purely monotheistic. Several thinkers believe that Plato's school of thinking was a precursor to Christianity, and thus proclaims a single, benevolent and ideal superior creature that created the best possible universe. This is all in Timaeus.

  1. Later schools of thought such as the Epicurian, explicitly abolished the concept of fate, or Gods intervening in everyday life. So to single-handedly call the ancients as fate-followers is incorrect.

  2. Christianity (I can assure you on the Orthodox flavor at least) truely believes in fate, to the extent that benevolent God judges our very actions.