3 added 780 characters in body
source | link

Substitutionism is a term in Marxist theory which refers to the relationship between the revolutionary party and the working class, where the former's activity substitutes the latter's. It is seen as an inverse to classical Marxism, where the "emancipation of the working class must be the work of the working class itself".

There seems to be a few terms in Marxist Communism which are often taken to prove a mistake, if demonstrated, analogous to I suppose fallacious reasoning. Such as revisionism. Or voluntarism, the idea (I think, roughly) that the working class can sieze political and economic power independent of economic change.

Within the Marxist movement, the word revisionism is used to refer to various ideas, principles and theories that are based on a significant revision of fundamental Marxist premises. The term is most often used by those Marxists who believe that such revisions are unwarranted and represent a "watering down" or abandonment of Marxism. As such, revisionism often carries pejorative connotations and the term has been used by many different factions

Or reformism (though that has a different more parliamentary meaning these days I think, with a different context entirely).:

  1. ( Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a doctrine or movement advocating reform, esp political or religious reform, rather than abolition

Or voluntarism:

In political philosophy, voluntarism is the view that understands political authority to be will-based. This view, which was propounded by theorists like Hobbes, Rousseau, and many members of the German idealist tradition, understands political authority as emanating from a will.

Are these all types of substitutionism, from different groups, communist, proletarian, or otherwise? i.e. is it the only thing that can prevent communism?

  How does the idea that there is no progressive ruling class fit within the answer to that?

Substitutionism is a term in Marxist theory which refers to the relationship between the revolutionary party and the working class, where the former's activity substitutes the latter's. It is seen as an inverse to classical Marxism, where the "emancipation of the working class must be the work of the working class itself".

There seems to be a few terms in Marxist Communism which are often taken to prove a mistake, if demonstrated, analogous to I suppose fallacious reasoning. Such as revisionism. Or voluntarism, the idea (I think, roughly) that the working class can sieze political and economic power independent of economic change. Or reformism (though that has a different more parliamentary meaning these days I think, with a different context entirely).

Are these all types of substitutionism, from different groups, communist, proletarian, or otherwise? i.e. is it the only thing that can prevent communism?

  How does the idea that there is no progressive ruling class fit within the answer to that?

Substitutionism is a term in Marxist theory which refers to the relationship between the revolutionary party and the working class, where the former's activity substitutes the latter's. It is seen as an inverse to classical Marxism, where the "emancipation of the working class must be the work of the working class itself".

There seems to be a few terms in Marxist Communism which are often taken to prove a mistake, if demonstrated, analogous to I suppose fallacious reasoning. Such as revisionism

Within the Marxist movement, the word revisionism is used to refer to various ideas, principles and theories that are based on a significant revision of fundamental Marxist premises. The term is most often used by those Marxists who believe that such revisions are unwarranted and represent a "watering down" or abandonment of Marxism. As such, revisionism often carries pejorative connotations and the term has been used by many different factions

Or reformism:

  1. ( Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a doctrine or movement advocating reform, esp political or religious reform, rather than abolition

Or voluntarism:

In political philosophy, voluntarism is the view that understands political authority to be will-based. This view, which was propounded by theorists like Hobbes, Rousseau, and many members of the German idealist tradition, understands political authority as emanating from a will.

Are these all types of substitutionism, from different groups, communist, proletarian, or otherwise? i.e. is it the only thing that can prevent communism? How does the idea that there is no progressive ruling class fit within the answer to that?

2 added 57 characters in body
source | link

SubstittionismSubstitutionism is a term in Marxist theory which refers to the relationship between the revolutionary party and the working class, where the former's activity substitutes the latter's. It is seen as an inverse to classical Marxism, where the "emancipation of the working class must be the work of the working class itself".

There seems to be a few terms in MarxismMarxist Communism which are often taken to prove a mistake, if demonstrated, analogous to I suppose fallacious reasoning. Such as revisionism, or. Or voluntarism, the idea (I think, roughly) that the working class can sieze political and economic power independent of economic change. Or reformism (though that has a different more parliamentary meaning these days I think, with a different context entirely).

Are these all types of substitutionism, from different groups, communist, proletarian, or otherwise? i.e. is it the only thing that can prevent communism?

How does the idea that there is no progressive ruling class fit within the answer to that?

Substittionism is a term in Marxist theory which refers to the relationship between the revolutionary party and the working class, where the former's activity substitutes the latter's. It is seen as an inverse to classical Marxism, where the "emancipation of the working class must be the work of the working class itself".

There a few terms in Marxism which are often taken to prove a mistake, if demonstrated, analogous to I suppose fallacious reasoning. Such as revisionism, or voluntarism, the idea (I think, roughly) that the working class can sieze political and economic power independent of economic change. Or reformism (though that has a different more parliamentary meaning these days I think).

Are these all types of substitutionism, from different groups, communist, proletarian, or otherwise? i.e. is it the only thing that can prevent communism?

How does the idea that there is no progressive ruling class fit within the answer to that?

Substitutionism is a term in Marxist theory which refers to the relationship between the revolutionary party and the working class, where the former's activity substitutes the latter's. It is seen as an inverse to classical Marxism, where the "emancipation of the working class must be the work of the working class itself".

There seems to be a few terms in Marxist Communism which are often taken to prove a mistake, if demonstrated, analogous to I suppose fallacious reasoning. Such as revisionism. Or voluntarism, the idea (I think, roughly) that the working class can sieze political and economic power independent of economic change. Or reformism (though that has a different more parliamentary meaning these days I think, with a different context entirely).

Are these all types of substitutionism, from different groups, communist, proletarian, or otherwise? i.e. is it the only thing that can prevent communism?

How does the idea that there is no progressive ruling class fit within the answer to that?

1
source | link

Is every mistake or reactionary form of Marxism "substitutionalist"?

Substittionism is a term in Marxist theory which refers to the relationship between the revolutionary party and the working class, where the former's activity substitutes the latter's. It is seen as an inverse to classical Marxism, where the "emancipation of the working class must be the work of the working class itself".

There a few terms in Marxism which are often taken to prove a mistake, if demonstrated, analogous to I suppose fallacious reasoning. Such as revisionism, or voluntarism, the idea (I think, roughly) that the working class can sieze political and economic power independent of economic change. Or reformism (though that has a different more parliamentary meaning these days I think).

Are these all types of substitutionism, from different groups, communist, proletarian, or otherwise? i.e. is it the only thing that can prevent communism?

How does the idea that there is no progressive ruling class fit within the answer to that?