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The key passages where Aristotle spoke about the elements of beauty are the following:

“The chief forms of beauty are order (τάξις - taxis) and symmetry (συμμετριασυμμετρία - symmetria) and definiteness (̇ωρισμενον̇ὡρισμένον - orismenon), which the mathematical sciences demonstrate in a special degree." (Metphysics, Book 13, Part 3)

"Again, a beautiful object, whether it be a picture of a living organism or any whole composed of parts, must not only have an orderly arrangement (τεταγμένα - tetagmena, from τάσσω) of parts, but must also be of a certain magnitude; for beauty depends on magnitude (μέγεθος - megethos) and order (τάξις - taxis)." (Poetics, Book 7)

None of those words seem to match your desciption, but what you are describing looks more like Latin than Greek. Thomas Aquinas, who followed much of Aristotle's philosophy, also wrote about about the elements of beauty in Latin:

"There are three requirements for beauty (pulchritudinem). Firstly, integrity (integritas) or perfection (perfectio)—for if something is impaired it is ugly. Then there is due proportion (proportio) or consonance (consonantia). And also clarity (claritas): whence things that are brightly coloured are called beautiful" (Summa Theologica I, 39, 8)

The key passages where Aristotle spoke about the elements of beauty are the following:

“The chief forms of beauty are order (τάξις - taxis) and symmetry (συμμετρια - symmetria) and definiteness (̇ωρισμενον - orismenon), which the mathematical sciences demonstrate in a special degree." (Metphysics, Book 13, Part 3)

"Again, a beautiful object, whether it be a picture of a living organism or any whole composed of parts, must not only have an orderly arrangement (τεταγμένα - tetagmena, from τάσσω) of parts, but must also be of a certain magnitude; for beauty depends on magnitude (μέγεθος - megethos) and order (τάξις - taxis)." (Poetics, Book 7)

None of those words seem to match your desciption, but what you are describing looks more like Latin than Greek. Thomas Aquinas, who followed much of Aristotle's philosophy, also wrote about about the elements of beauty in Latin:

"There are three requirements for beauty (pulchritudinem). Firstly, integrity (integritas) or perfection (perfectio)—for if something is impaired it is ugly. Then there is due proportion (proportio) or consonance (consonantia). And also clarity (claritas): whence things that are brightly coloured are called beautiful" (Summa Theologica I, 39, 8)

The key passages where Aristotle spoke about the elements of beauty are the following:

“The chief forms of beauty are order (τάξις - taxis) and symmetry (συμμετρία - symmetria) and definiteness (̇ὡρισμένον - orismenon), which the mathematical sciences demonstrate in a special degree." (Metphysics, Book 13, Part 3)

"Again, a beautiful object, whether it be a picture of a living organism or any whole composed of parts, must not only have an orderly arrangement (τεταγμένα - tetagmena, from τάσσω) of parts, but must also be of a certain magnitude; for beauty depends on magnitude (μέγεθος - megethos) and order (τάξις - taxis)." (Poetics, Book 7)

None of those words seem to match your desciption, but what you are describing looks more like Latin than Greek. Thomas Aquinas, who followed much of Aristotle's philosophy, also wrote about about the elements of beauty in Latin:

"There are three requirements for beauty (pulchritudinem). Firstly, integrity (integritas) or perfection (perfectio)—for if something is impaired it is ugly. Then there is due proportion (proportio) or consonance (consonantia). And also clarity (claritas): whence things that are brightly coloured are called beautiful" (Summa Theologica I, 39, 8)

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source | link

The key passages where Aristotle spoke about the elements of beauty are the following:

“The chief forms of beauty are order (τάξις - taxis) and symmetry (συμμετρια - symmetria) and definiteness (̇ωρισμενον - orismenon), which the mathematical sciences demonstrate in a special degree." (Metphysics, Book 13, Part 3)

"Again, a beautiful object, whether it be a picture of a living organism or any whole composed of parts, must not only have an orderly arrangement (τεταγμένα - tetagmena, from τάσσω) of parts, but must also be of a certain magnitude; for beauty depends on magnitude (μέγεθος - megethos) and order (τάξις - taxis)." (Poetics, Book 7)

None of those words seem to match your desciption, but what you are describing looks more like Latin than Greek. Thomas Aquinas, who followed much of Aristotle's philosophy, also wrote about about the elements of beauty in Latin:

"There are three requirements for beauty (pulchritudinem). Firstly, integrity (integritas) or perfection (perfectio)—for if something is impaired it is ugly. Then there is due proportion (proportio) or consonance (consonantia). And also clarity (claritas): whence things that are brightly coloured are called beautiful" (Summa Theologica I, 39, 8)