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Pierre Duhem—a prominent physicist, philosopher of physics, and historian of medieval physics—discusses "physical law" (which he distinguishes from "physical theory") in his Aim & Structure of Physical Theory ch. 5 pp. 165ff (French original).

Here are the subsections of that chapter:

  1. The laws of physics are symbolic relations.
  2. A law of physics is, properly speaking, neither true nor false but approximate.
  3. Every law of physics is provisional and relative because it is approximate.
  4. Every physical law is provisional because it is symbolic.
  5. The laws of physics are more detailed than the laws of common sense.


cf. also ch. 10 "Physical Laws" of The Physical System of St. Thomas by G.M. Cornoldi, S.J.

The laws of physics are symbolic relations.
His definition of physical law (ibid. p. 168): "A physical law is a symbolic relation whose application to concrete reality requires that a whole group of laws be known and accepted."
  • A law of physics is, properly speaking, neither true nor false but approximate.
  • Every law of physics is provisional and relative because it is approximate.
  • Every physical law is provisional because it is symbolic.
  • The laws of physics are more detailed than the laws of common sense.

  • cf. also ch. 10 "Physical Laws" of The Physical System of St. Thomas by G.M. Cornoldi, S.J.

    Pierre Duhem—a prominent physicist, philosopher of physics, and historian of medieval physics—discusses "physical law" (which he distinguishes from "physical theory") in his Aim & Structure of Physical Theory ch. 5 pp. 165ff (French original).

    Here are the subsections of that chapter:

    1. The laws of physics are symbolic relations.
    2. A law of physics is, properly speaking, neither true nor false but approximate.
    3. Every law of physics is provisional and relative because it is approximate.
    4. Every physical law is provisional because it is symbolic.
    5. The laws of physics are more detailed than the laws of common sense.


    cf. also ch. 10 "Physical Laws" of The Physical System of St. Thomas by G.M. Cornoldi, S.J.

    Pierre Duhem—a prominent physicist, philosopher of physics, and historian of medieval physics—discusses "physical law" (which he distinguishes from "physical theory") in his Aim & Structure of Physical Theory ch. 5 pp. 165ff (French original).

    Here are the subsections of that chapter:

    1. The laws of physics are symbolic relations.
      His definition of physical law (ibid. p. 168): "A physical law is a symbolic relation whose application to concrete reality requires that a whole group of laws be known and accepted."
    2. A law of physics is, properly speaking, neither true nor false but approximate.
    3. Every law of physics is provisional and relative because it is approximate.
    4. Every physical law is provisional because it is symbolic.
    5. The laws of physics are more detailed than the laws of common sense.


    cf. also ch. 10 "Physical Laws" of The Physical System of St. Thomas by G.M. Cornoldi, S.J.

    1
    source | link

    Pierre Duhem—a prominent physicist, philosopher of physics, and historian of medieval physics—discusses "physical law" (which he distinguishes from "physical theory") in his Aim & Structure of Physical Theory ch. 5 pp. 165ff (French original).

    Here are the subsections of that chapter:

    1. The laws of physics are symbolic relations.
    2. A law of physics is, properly speaking, neither true nor false but approximate.
    3. Every law of physics is provisional and relative because it is approximate.
    4. Every physical law is provisional because it is symbolic.
    5. The laws of physics are more detailed than the laws of common sense.


    cf. also ch. 10 "Physical Laws" of The Physical System of St. Thomas by G.M. Cornoldi, S.J.