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What makes you think that Adorno is suggesting any solution to the problem? I've not read his entire works, but what I have read provides me with no indication that Adorno saw himself in any way responsible for solving or providing solutions to the problems he laments.

His definition of the role of the culture industry in controlling our emotional and critical responses is no different to the role of a jailor in constraining our freedom of movement. It is nonot sufficient to simply become aware that you are thus constrained, you are no less restricted.

The phrase, the world wants to be deceived, has become truer than had ever been intended. People are not only, as the saying goes, falling for the swindle; if it guarantees them even the most fleeting gratification they desire a deception which is nonetheless transparent to them. They force their eyes shut and voice approval, in a kind of self-loathing, for what is meted out to them, knowing fully the purpose for which it is manufactured. Without admitting it they sense that their lives would be completely intolerable as soon as they no longer clung to satisfactions which are none at all.

From "The Culture Industry Reconsidered" (1975)

If a solution were in any way implied here (and I'm not sure it is) it would be that consuming the products of modern culture even whilst "seeing through it" is exactly the problem, the solution being no longer consuming those products, but this is akin (in the example of the Jailor) to suggesting "no longer be jailed"as a solution. It is possible to escape a prison but it is not a philosophical act alone.

What makes you think that Adorno is suggesting any solution to the problem? I've not read his entire works, but what I have read provides me with no indication that Adorno saw himself in any way responsible for solving or providing solutions to the problems he laments.

His definition of the role of the culture industry in controlling our emotional and critical responses is no different to the role of a jailor in constraining our freedom of movement. It is no sufficient to simply become aware that you are thus constrained, you are no less restricted.

The phrase, the world wants to be deceived, has become truer than had ever been intended. People are not only, as the saying goes, falling for the swindle; if it guarantees them even the most fleeting gratification they desire a deception which is nonetheless transparent to them. They force their eyes shut and voice approval, in a kind of self-loathing, for what is meted out to them, knowing fully the purpose for which it is manufactured. Without admitting it they sense that their lives would be completely intolerable as soon as they no longer clung to satisfactions which are none at all.

From "The Culture Industry Reconsidered" (1975)

If a solution were in any way implied here (and I'm not sure it is) it would be that consuming the products of modern culture even whilst "seeing through it" is exactly the problem, the solution being no longer consuming those products, but this is akin (in the example of the Jailor) to suggesting "no longer be jailed"as a solution. It is possible to escape a prison but it is not a philosophical act alone.

What makes you think that Adorno is suggesting any solution to the problem? I've not read his entire works, but what I have read provides me with no indication that Adorno saw himself in any way responsible for solving or providing solutions to the problems he laments.

His definition of the role of the culture industry in controlling our emotional and critical responses is no different to the role of a jailor in constraining our freedom of movement. It is not sufficient to simply become aware that you are thus constrained, you are no less restricted.

The phrase, the world wants to be deceived, has become truer than had ever been intended. People are not only, as the saying goes, falling for the swindle; if it guarantees them even the most fleeting gratification they desire a deception which is nonetheless transparent to them. They force their eyes shut and voice approval, in a kind of self-loathing, for what is meted out to them, knowing fully the purpose for which it is manufactured. Without admitting it they sense that their lives would be completely intolerable as soon as they no longer clung to satisfactions which are none at all.

From "The Culture Industry Reconsidered" (1975)

If a solution were in any way implied here (and I'm not sure it is) it would be that consuming the products of modern culture even whilst "seeing through it" is exactly the problem, the solution being no longer consuming those products, but this is akin (in the example of the Jailor) to suggesting "no longer be jailed"as a solution. It is possible to escape a prison but it is not a philosophical act alone.

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What makes you think that Adorno is suggesting any solution to the problem? I've not read his entire works, but what I have read provides me with no indication that Adorno saw himself in any way responsible for solving or providing solutions to the problems he laments.

His definition of the role of the culture industry in controlling our emotional and critical responses is no different to the role of a jailor in constraining our freedom of movement. It is no sufficient to simply become aware that you are thus constrained, you are no less restricted.

The phrase, the world wants to be deceived, has become truer than had ever been intended. People are not only, as the saying goes, falling for the swindle; if it guarantees them even the most fleeting gratification they desire a deception which is nonetheless transparent to them. They force their eyes shut and voice approval, in a kind of self-loathing, for what is meted out to them, knowing fully the purpose for which it is manufactured. Without admitting it they sense that their lives would be completely intolerable as soon as they no longer clung to satisfactions which are none at all.

From "The Culture Industry Reconsidered" (1975)

If a solution were in any way implied here (and I'm not sure it is) it would be that consuming the products of modern culture even whilst "seeing through it" is exactly the problem, the solution being no longer consuming those products, but this is akin (in the example of the Jailor) to suggesting "no longer be jailed"as a solution. It is possible to escape a prison but it is not a philosophical act alone.

What makes you think that Adorno is suggesting any solution to the problem? I've not read his entire works, but what I have read provides me with no indication that Adorno saw himself in any way responsible for solving or providing solutions to the problems he laments.

His definition of the role of the culture industry in controlling our emotional and critical responses is no different to the role of a jailor in constraining our freedom of movement. It is no sufficient to simply become aware that you are thus constrained, you are no less restricted.

The phrase, the world wants to be deceived, has become truer than had ever been intended. People are not only, as the saying goes, falling for the swindle; if it guarantees them even the most fleeting gratification they desire a deception which is nonetheless transparent to them. They force their eyes shut and voice approval, in a kind of self-loathing, for what is meted out to them, knowing fully the purpose for which it is manufactured. Without admitting it they sense that their lives would be completely intolerable as soon as they no longer clung to satisfactions which are none at all.

If a solution were in any way implied here (and I'm not sure it is) it would be that consuming the products of modern culture even whilst "seeing through it" is exactly the problem, the solution being no longer consuming those products, but this is akin (in the example of the Jailor) to suggesting "no longer be jailed"as a solution. It is possible to escape a prison but it is not a philosophical act alone.

What makes you think that Adorno is suggesting any solution to the problem? I've not read his entire works, but what I have read provides me with no indication that Adorno saw himself in any way responsible for solving or providing solutions to the problems he laments.

His definition of the role of the culture industry in controlling our emotional and critical responses is no different to the role of a jailor in constraining our freedom of movement. It is no sufficient to simply become aware that you are thus constrained, you are no less restricted.

The phrase, the world wants to be deceived, has become truer than had ever been intended. People are not only, as the saying goes, falling for the swindle; if it guarantees them even the most fleeting gratification they desire a deception which is nonetheless transparent to them. They force their eyes shut and voice approval, in a kind of self-loathing, for what is meted out to them, knowing fully the purpose for which it is manufactured. Without admitting it they sense that their lives would be completely intolerable as soon as they no longer clung to satisfactions which are none at all.

From "The Culture Industry Reconsidered" (1975)

If a solution were in any way implied here (and I'm not sure it is) it would be that consuming the products of modern culture even whilst "seeing through it" is exactly the problem, the solution being no longer consuming those products, but this is akin (in the example of the Jailor) to suggesting "no longer be jailed"as a solution. It is possible to escape a prison but it is not a philosophical act alone.

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What makes you think that Adorno is suggesting any solution to the problem? I've not read his entire works, but what I have read provides me with no indication that Adorno saw himself in any way responsible for solving or providing solutions to the problems he laments.

His definition of the role of the culture industry in controlling our emotional and critical responses is no different to the role of a jailor in constraining our freedom of movement. It is no sufficient to simply become aware that you are thus constrained, you are no less restricted.

The phrase, the world wants to be deceived, has become truer than had ever been intended. People are not only, as the saying goes, falling for the swindle; if it guarantees them even the most fleeting gratification they desire a deception which is nonetheless transparent to them. They force their eyes shut and voice approval, in a kind of self-loathing, for what is meted out to them, knowing fully the purpose for which it is manufactured. Without admitting it they sense that their lives would be completely intolerable as soon as they no longer clung to satisfactions which are none at all.

If a solution were in any way implied here (and I'm not sure it is) it would be that consuming the products of modern culture even whilst "seeing through it" is exactly the problem, the solution being no longer consuming those products, but this is akin (in the example of the Jailor) to suggesting "no longer be jailed"as a solution. It is possible to escape a prison but it is not a philosophical act alone.