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Searle invented a thought experiment, the Chinese Room, which he proposes is an argument against Strong AI (that machines think) but not against Weak AI (that machines simulate thinking), he has a man in a room manipulating chinese symbols via an instruction book written in english.

My question is, Where does this instruction book come from? We're all aware that humans write the code that drives a computer, or writes code that writes more code to drive a computer (ie a compiler) etc.

My clarification (that is, if it is), of Searle's Chinese Room thought experiment, is to have a man (John) who doesn't understand Chinese in a room with two windows. At one window, someone (Mai) submits questions in Chinese, at the other window stands a man (Lao) who does understand Chinese; when a question is submitted, John takes the question walks across the room, and passes it through the window, and gives it to Lao, who reads it, answers it, and then John walks back to the first window, and hands the answer back to the Mai.

To Mai, it appears John understands Chinese (even, if he rather strangely refuses to speak it). She is not aware that he has a secret human collaborator, Lao.

I think this models what actually happens in a computer, much more clearly. But am I rightis this an accurate analogy?

Searle invented a thought experiment, the Chinese Room, which he proposes is an argument against Strong AI (that machines think) but not against Weak AI (that machines simulate thinking), he has a man in a room manipulating chinese symbols via an instruction book written in english.

My question is, Where does this instruction book come from? We're all aware that humans write the code that drives a computer, or writes code that writes more code to drive a computer (ie a compiler) etc.

My clarification (that is, if it is), of Searle's Chinese Room thought experiment, is to have a man (John) who doesn't understand Chinese in a room with two windows. At one window, someone (Mai) submits questions in Chinese, at the other window stands a man (Lao) who does understand Chinese; when a question is submitted, John takes the question walks across the room, and passes it through the window, and gives it to Lao, who reads it, answers it, and then John walks back to the first window, and hands the answer back to the Mai.

To Mai, it appears John understands Chinese (even, if he rather strangely refuses to speak it). She is not aware that he has a secret human collaborator, Lao.

I think this models what actually happens in a computer, much more clearly. But am I right?

Searle invented a thought experiment, the Chinese Room, which he proposes is an argument against Strong AI (that machines think) but not against Weak AI (that machines simulate thinking), he has a man in a room manipulating chinese symbols via an instruction book written in english.

My question is, Where does this instruction book come from? We're all aware that humans write the code that drives a computer, or writes code that writes more code to drive a computer (ie a compiler) etc.

My clarification (that is, if it is), of Searle's Chinese Room thought experiment, is to have a man (John) who doesn't understand Chinese in a room with two windows. At one window, someone (Mai) submits questions in Chinese, at the other window stands a man (Lao) who does understand Chinese; when a question is submitted, John takes the question walks across the room, and passes it through the window, and gives it to Lao, who reads it, answers it, and then John walks back to the first window, and hands the answer back to the Mai.

To Mai, it appears John understands Chinese (even, if he rather strangely refuses to speak it). She is not aware that he has a secret human collaborator, Lao.

I think this models what actually happens in a computer, much more clearly. But is this an accurate analogy?

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Searle invented a thought experiment, the Chinese Room, which he proposes is an argument against Strong AI (that machines think) but not against Weak AI (that machines simulate thinking), he has a man in a room manipulating chinese symbols via an instruction book written in english.

My question is, Where does this instruction book come from? We're all aware that humans write the code that drives a computer, or writes code that writes more code to drive a computer (ie a compiler) etc.

My clarification (that is, if it is), of SearlesSearle's Chinese Room thought experiment, is to have a man (John) who doesn't understand Chinese in a room with two windows. At one window, someone (Mai) submits questions in Chinese, at the other window stands a man (Lao) who does understand Chinese; when a question is submitted, John takes the question walks across the room, and passes it through the window, and gives it to Lao, who reads it, answers it, and then John walks back to the first window, and hands the answer back to the Mai.

To Mai, it appears John understandunderstands Chinese (even, if he rather strangely refuses to speak it). She is not aware that he has a secret human collaboratercollaborator, Lao.

I think this models what actually happens in a computer, much more clearly. But am I right?

Searle invented a thought experiment, the Chinese Room, which he proposes is an argument against Strong AI (that machines think) but not against Weak AI (that machines simulate thinking), he has a man in a room manipulating chinese symbols via an instruction book written in english.

My question is, Where does this instruction book come from? We're all aware that humans write the code that drives a computer, or writes code that writes more code to drive a computer (ie a compiler) etc.

My clarification (that is, if it is), of Searles Chinese Room thought experiment, is to have a man (John) who doesn't understand Chinese in a room with two windows. At one window, someone (Mai) submits questions in Chinese, at the other window stands a man (Lao) who does understand Chinese; when a question is submitted, John takes the question walks across the room, and passes it through the window, and gives it to Lao, who reads it, answers it, and then John walks back to the first window, and hands the answer back to the Mai.

To Mai, it appears John understand Chinese (even, if he rather strangely refuses to speak it). She is not aware that he has a secret human collaborater, Lao.

I think this models what actually happens in a computer, much more clearly.

Searle invented a thought experiment, the Chinese Room, which he proposes is an argument against Strong AI (that machines think) but not against Weak AI (that machines simulate thinking), he has a man in a room manipulating chinese symbols via an instruction book written in english.

My question is, Where does this instruction book come from? We're all aware that humans write the code that drives a computer, or writes code that writes more code to drive a computer (ie a compiler) etc.

My clarification (that is, if it is), of Searle's Chinese Room thought experiment, is to have a man (John) who doesn't understand Chinese in a room with two windows. At one window, someone (Mai) submits questions in Chinese, at the other window stands a man (Lao) who does understand Chinese; when a question is submitted, John takes the question walks across the room, and passes it through the window, and gives it to Lao, who reads it, answers it, and then John walks back to the first window, and hands the answer back to the Mai.

To Mai, it appears John understands Chinese (even, if he rather strangely refuses to speak it). She is not aware that he has a secret human collaborator, Lao.

I think this models what actually happens in a computer, much more clearly. But am I right?

5 deleted 19 characters in body
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Searle invented a thought experiment, the Chinese Room, which he proposes is an argument against Strong AI (that machines think) but not against Weak AI (that machines simulate thinking), he has a man in a room manipulating chinese symbols via an instruction book written in english.

My question is, Where does this instruction book come from? We're all aware that humans write the code that drives a computer, or writes code that writes more code to drive a computer (ie a compiler) etc.

My clarification (that is, if it is), of Searle'sSearles Chinese Room thought experiment, is to have a man (John) who doesn't understand Chinese in a room with two windows. At one window, someone (Mai) submits questions in Chinese, at the other window stands a man (Lao) who does understand Chinese; when a question is submitted, John takes the question walks across the room, and passes it through the window, and gives it to Lao, who reads it, answers it, and then John walks back to the first window, and hands the answer back to the Mai.

To Mai, it appears John understandsunderstand Chinese (even, if he rather strangely refuses to speak it). She is not aware that he has a secret human collaboratorcollaborater, Lao.

I think this models what actually happens in a computer, much more clearly. But am I right?

Searle invented a thought experiment, the Chinese Room, which he proposes is an argument against Strong AI (that machines think) but not against Weak AI (that machines simulate thinking), he has a man in a room manipulating chinese symbols via an instruction book written in english.

My question is, Where does this instruction book come from? We're all aware that humans write the code that drives a computer, or writes code that writes more code to drive a computer (ie a compiler) etc.

My clarification (that is, if it is), of Searle's Chinese Room thought experiment, is to have a man (John) who doesn't understand Chinese in a room with two windows. At one window, someone (Mai) submits questions in Chinese, at the other window stands a man (Lao) who does understand Chinese; when a question is submitted, John takes the question walks across the room, and passes it through the window, and gives it to Lao, who reads it, answers it, and then John walks back to the first window, and hands the answer back to the Mai.

To Mai, it appears John understands Chinese (even, if he rather strangely refuses to speak it). She is not aware that he has a secret human collaborator, Lao.

I think this models what actually happens in a computer, much more clearly. But am I right?

Searle invented a thought experiment, the Chinese Room, which he proposes is an argument against Strong AI (that machines think) but not against Weak AI (that machines simulate thinking), he has a man in a room manipulating chinese symbols via an instruction book written in english.

My question is, Where does this instruction book come from? We're all aware that humans write the code that drives a computer, or writes code that writes more code to drive a computer (ie a compiler) etc.

My clarification (that is, if it is), of Searles Chinese Room thought experiment, is to have a man (John) who doesn't understand Chinese in a room with two windows. At one window, someone (Mai) submits questions in Chinese, at the other window stands a man (Lao) who does understand Chinese; when a question is submitted, John takes the question walks across the room, and passes it through the window, and gives it to Lao, who reads it, answers it, and then John walks back to the first window, and hands the answer back to the Mai.

To Mai, it appears John understand Chinese (even, if he rather strangely refuses to speak it). She is not aware that he has a secret human collaborater, Lao.

I think this models what actually happens in a computer, much more clearly.

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