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"Possible worlds" must be read as a façon de parler.

See Kripke semantics:

A Kripke frame or modal frame is a pair (W,R), where W is a set, and R is a binary relation on W. Elements of W are called nodes (or worlds) and R is known as the accessibility relation.

See: Saul Kripke, A Completeness Theorem in Modal Logic, JSL (1959).

The same in E.Zalta, Basic Concepts in Modal Logic:

A standard model M for a set of atomic formulas shall be any triple (W;R;V) satisfying the following conditions:

1) W is a non-empty set,

2) R is a binary relation on W, [...]

Remark: For any given model M, we call W the set of worlds in M, R the accessibility relation for M.


See also: John Divers, Possible Worlds, Routledge (2002).

"Possible worlds" must be read as a façon de parler.

See Kripke semantics:

A Kripke frame or modal frame is a pair (W,R), where W is a set, and R is a binary relation on W. Elements of W are called nodes (or worlds) and R is known as the accessibility relation.

See: Saul Kripke, A Completeness Theorem in Modal Logic, JSL (1959).

The same in E.Zalta, Basic Concepts in Modal Logic:

A standard model M for a set of atomic formulas shall be any triple (W;R;V) satisfying the following conditions:

1) W is a non-empty set,

2) R is a binary relation on W, [...]

Remark: For any given model M, we call W the set of worlds in M, R the accessibility relation for M.

"Possible worlds" must be read as a façon de parler.

See Kripke semantics:

A Kripke frame or modal frame is a pair (W,R), where W is a set, and R is a binary relation on W. Elements of W are called nodes (or worlds) and R is known as the accessibility relation.

See: Saul Kripke, A Completeness Theorem in Modal Logic, JSL (1959).

The same in E.Zalta, Basic Concepts in Modal Logic:

A standard model M for a set of atomic formulas shall be any triple (W;R;V) satisfying the following conditions:

1) W is a non-empty set,

2) R is a binary relation on W, [...]

Remark: For any given model M, we call W the set of worlds in M, R the accessibility relation for M.


See also: John Divers, Possible Worlds, Routledge (2002).

2 added 437 characters in body
source | link

"Possible worlds" must be read as a façon de parler.

See Kripke semantics:

A Kripke frame or modal frame is a pair (W,R), where W is a set, and R is a binary relation on W. Elements of W are called nodes (or worlds) and R is known as the accessibility relation relation.

See: Saul Kripke, A Completeness Theorem in Modal Logic, JSL (1959).

The same in E.Zalta, Basic Concepts in Modal Logic:

A standard model M for a set of atomic formulas shall be any triple (W;R;V) satisfying the following conditions:

1) W is a non-empty set,

2) R is a binary relation on W, [...]

Remark: For any given model M, we call W the set of worlds in M, R the accessibility relation for M.

"Possible worlds" must be read as a façon de parler.

See Kripke semantics:

A Kripke frame or modal frame is a pair (W,R), where W is a set, and R is a binary relation on W. Elements of W are called nodes (or worlds) and R is known as the accessibility relation.

See: Saul Kripke, A Completeness Theorem in Modal Logic, JSL (1959).

"Possible worlds" must be read as a façon de parler.

See Kripke semantics:

A Kripke frame or modal frame is a pair (W,R), where W is a set, and R is a binary relation on W. Elements of W are called nodes (or worlds) and R is known as the accessibility relation.

See: Saul Kripke, A Completeness Theorem in Modal Logic, JSL (1959).

The same in E.Zalta, Basic Concepts in Modal Logic:

A standard model M for a set of atomic formulas shall be any triple (W;R;V) satisfying the following conditions:

1) W is a non-empty set,

2) R is a binary relation on W, [...]

Remark: For any given model M, we call W the set of worlds in M, R the accessibility relation for M.

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source | link

"Possible worlds" must be read as a façon de parler.

See Kripke semantics:

A Kripke frame or modal frame is a pair (W,R), where W is a set, and R is a binary relation on W. Elements of W are called nodes (or worlds) and R is known as the accessibility relation.

See: Saul Kripke, A Completeness Theorem in Modal Logic, JSL (1959).