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What is the name of that kind of argumentfor X is too hard /fallacy? hopeless to practically implement,. Therefore abandon X

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I come across that kind of argument sometimes, and I would like to know if it has a registered "type of argument" or maybe "fallacy" name in the philosophical literature. The argument runs something like: "there are already more guns than people in the US, therefore it is a lost cause, there is no point trying to restrict gun ownership"improve the situation with guns in the US". Please, let's not argue about guns in the US, but about that type of argument. The idea is that something is more or less hopeless, so there is no point trying to expand any effort on it. Is it just a "personal opinion" rather than a "type of argument"? Is it a "fallacy"?

I come across that kind of argument sometimes, and I would like to know if it has a registered "type of argument" name in the philosophical literature. The argument runs something like: "there are already more guns than people in the US, therefore it is a lost cause, there is no point trying to restrict gun ownership". Please, let's not argue about guns in the US, but about that type of argument. The idea is that something is more or less hopeless, so there is no point trying to expand any effort on it. Is it just a "personal opinion" rather than a "type of argument"? Is it a "fallacy"?

I come across that kind of argument sometimes, and I would like to know if it has a registered "type of argument" or maybe "fallacy" name in the philosophical literature. The argument runs something like: "there are already more guns than people in the US, therefore it is a lost cause, there is no point trying to improve the situation with guns in the US". Please, let's not argue about guns in the US, but about that type of argument. The idea is that something is more or less hopeless, so there is no point trying to expand any effort on it. Is it just a "personal opinion" rather than a "type of argument"? Is it a "fallacy"?

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source | link

What is the name of that kind of argument/fallacy?

I come across that kind of argument sometimes, and I would like to know if it has a registered "type of argument" name in the philosophical literature. The argument runs something like: "there are already more guns than people in the US, therefore it is a lost cause, there is no point trying to restrict gun ownership". Please, let's not argue about guns in the US, but about that type of argument. The idea is that something is more or less hopeless, so there is no point trying to expand any effort on it. Is it just a "personal opinion" rather than a "type of argument"? Is it a "fallacy"?