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This is only a partial answer presenting some doubts that Plotinus was attempting a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist traditions of monotheism.

Plotinus’s monotheism would come from the introduction of the One through what Dominic J. O’Meara calls the "Principle of Prior Simplicity", that is, “the idea that everything made up of parts, every composite thing, depends and derives in some way from what is not composite, what is simple.” (Plotinus: An Introduction to the Enneads, Oxford, 1995, p. 44) This principle is also called the doctrine of divine simplicity.

Further according to O'Meara (p. 44-5):

Applying the Principle of Prior Simplicity, Plotinus thus came to the conclusion that we must postulate, over and beyond divine intellect, an ultimate cause which would be absolutely simple, the 'One'. In drawing this conclusion Plotinus not only separated himself from his Platonist and Aristotelian predecessors; he also belevedbelieved himself to be in a position to throw light on some crucial but obscure passages in Plato's dialogues.

From O'Meara's perspective it seems that Plotinus was mainly interested in expounding Plato, not assimilating Jewish traditions into Platonism.

William Wainwright in his “Monotheism” SEP article listed divine simplicity as only one argument for monotheism. Other ways to argue for monotheism would be through God’s perfection, sovereignty, omnipotence and demand for total devotion. Also Wainwright claims that “not all theists accept” divine simplicity. The idea of divine simplicity may not have had an adequate influence to form a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist views of monotheism.

There is also the controversial Tübingen School maintaining that Plato had unwritten doctrines containing much of what is believed to be new in Plotinus. If Plotinus did not offer much that was new his role in welding the two traditions, Jewish and Platonist, might be minor.

According to the cited Wikipedia article:

Neoplatonism had an enduring influence on the subsequent history of philosophy. In the Middle Ages, Neoplatonic ideas were studied and discussed by Islamic, Christian, and Jewish thinkers.

Whatever happened after Plotinus, a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist ideas about monotheism may not have been his motivation.

This is only a partial answer presenting some doubts that Plotinus was attempting a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist traditions of monotheism.

Plotinus’s monotheism would come from the introduction of the One through what Dominic J. O’Meara calls the "Principle of Prior Simplicity", that is, “the idea that everything made up of parts, every composite thing, depends and derives in some way from what is not composite, what is simple.” (Plotinus: An Introduction to the Enneads, Oxford, 1995, p. 44) This principle is also called the doctrine of divine simplicity.

Further according to O'Meara (p. 44-5):

Applying the Principle of Prior Simplicity, Plotinus thus came to the conclusion that we must postulate, over and beyond divine intellect, an ultimate cause which would be absolutely simple, the 'One'. In drawing this conclusion Plotinus not only separated himself from his Platonist and Aristotelian predecessors; he also beleved himself to be in a position to throw light on some crucial but obscure passages in Plato's dialogues.

From O'Meara's perspective it seems that Plotinus was mainly interested in expounding Plato, not assimilating Jewish traditions into Platonism.

William Wainwright in his “Monotheism” SEP article listed divine simplicity as only one argument for monotheism. Other ways to argue for monotheism would be through God’s perfection, sovereignty, omnipotence and demand for total devotion. Also Wainwright claims that “not all theists accept” divine simplicity. The idea of divine simplicity may not have had an adequate influence to form a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist views of monotheism.

There is also the controversial Tübingen School maintaining that Plato had unwritten doctrines containing much of what is believed to be new in Plotinus. If Plotinus did not offer much that was new his role in welding the two traditions, Jewish and Platonist, might be minor.

According to the cited Wikipedia article:

Neoplatonism had an enduring influence on the subsequent history of philosophy. In the Middle Ages, Neoplatonic ideas were studied and discussed by Islamic, Christian, and Jewish thinkers.

Whatever happened after Plotinus, a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist ideas about monotheism may not have been his motivation.

This is only a partial answer presenting some doubts that Plotinus was attempting a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist traditions of monotheism.

Plotinus’s monotheism would come from the introduction of the One through what Dominic J. O’Meara calls the "Principle of Prior Simplicity", that is, “the idea that everything made up of parts, every composite thing, depends and derives in some way from what is not composite, what is simple.” (Plotinus: An Introduction to the Enneads, Oxford, 1995, p. 44) This principle is also called the doctrine of divine simplicity.

Further according to O'Meara (p. 44-5):

Applying the Principle of Prior Simplicity, Plotinus thus came to the conclusion that we must postulate, over and beyond divine intellect, an ultimate cause which would be absolutely simple, the 'One'. In drawing this conclusion Plotinus not only separated himself from his Platonist and Aristotelian predecessors; he also believed himself to be in a position to throw light on some crucial but obscure passages in Plato's dialogues.

From O'Meara's perspective it seems that Plotinus was mainly interested in expounding Plato, not assimilating Jewish traditions into Platonism.

William Wainwright in his “Monotheism” SEP article listed divine simplicity as only one argument for monotheism. Other ways to argue for monotheism would be through God’s perfection, sovereignty, omnipotence and demand for total devotion. Also Wainwright claims that “not all theists accept” divine simplicity. The idea of divine simplicity may not have had an adequate influence to form a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist views of monotheism.

There is also the controversial Tübingen School maintaining that Plato had unwritten doctrines containing much of what is believed to be new in Plotinus. If Plotinus did not offer much that was new his role in welding the two traditions, Jewish and Platonist, might be minor.

According to the cited Wikipedia article:

Neoplatonism had an enduring influence on the subsequent history of philosophy. In the Middle Ages, Neoplatonic ideas were studied and discussed by Islamic, Christian, and Jewish thinkers.

Whatever happened after Plotinus, a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist ideas about monotheism may not have been his motivation.

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This is only a partial answer presenting some doubts that Plotinus was attempting a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist traditions of monotheism.

Plotinus’s monotheism would come from the introduction of the One through what Dominic J. O’Meara calls the "Principle of Prior Simplicity", that is, “the idea that everything made up of parts, every composite thing, depends and derives in some way from what is not composite, what is simple.” (Plotinus: An Introduction to the Enneads, Oxford, 1995, p. 44) This principle is also called the doctrine of divine simplicity.

Further according to O'Meara (p. 44-5):

Applying the Principle of Prior Simplicity, Plotinus thus came to the conclusion that we must postulate, over and beyond divine intellect, an ultimate cause which would be absolutely simple, the 'One'. In drawing this conclusion Plotinus not only separated himself from his Platonist and Aristotelian predecessors; he also beleved himself to be in a position to throw light on some crucial but obscure passages in Plato's dialogues.

From O'Meara's perspective it seems that Plotinus was mainly interested in expounding Plato, not assimilating Jewish traditions into Platonism.

William Wainwright in his “Monotheism” SEP article listed divine simplicity as only one argument for monotheism. Other ways to argue for monotheism would be through God’s perfection, sovereignty, omnipotence and demand for total devotion. Also Wainwright claims that “not all theists accept” divine simplicity. The idea of divine simplicity may not have had an adequate influence to form a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist views of monotheism.

There is also the controversial Tübingen School maintaining that Plato had unwritten doctrines containing much of what is believed to be new in Plotinus. If Plotinus did not offer much that was new his role in welding the two traditions, Jewish and Platonist, might be minor.

According to the cited Wikipedia article:

Neoplatonism had an enduring influence on the subsequent history of philosophy. In the Middle Ages, Neoplatonic ideas were studied and discussed by Islamic, Christian, and Jewish thinkers.

Whatever happened after Plotinus, a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist ideas about monotheism may not have been his motivation.