2 edited body
source | link

You write:

I haven't fully abandoned the idea of free will as it may be possible in either a way I can't perceive or there's possibly some other option in how the universe works other than causality or randomness. I want to make sure I'm not being close minded and instantly accepting the non-existence of free will. So are there any arguments that may give me a better understanding of how free will could exist without being incoherent?

There is another option - that the universe cannot be understood in terms of determinism nor randomness; however since these are the only two categories by which we can comprehend it, this option is necessarily incoherent, or better said unintelligible. It is a mystery to me why so many philosophers insist on coherency or intelligibility of the universe - such incredible vanity.

If you really want to make sure you are not being close minded then take a look down thatthis unfashionable path.

You write:

I haven't fully abandoned the idea of free will as it may be possible in either a way I can't perceive or there's possibly some other option in how the universe works other than causality or randomness. I want to make sure I'm not being close minded and instantly accepting the non-existence of free will. So are there any arguments that may give me a better understanding of how free will could exist without being incoherent?

There is another option - that the universe cannot be understood in terms of determinism nor randomness; however since these are the only two categories by which we can comprehend it, this option is necessarily incoherent, or better said unintelligible. It is a mystery to me why so many philosophers insist on coherency or intelligibility of the universe - such incredible vanity.

If you really want to make sure you are not being close minded then take a look down that unfashionable path.

You write:

I haven't fully abandoned the idea of free will as it may be possible in either a way I can't perceive or there's possibly some other option in how the universe works other than causality or randomness. I want to make sure I'm not being close minded and instantly accepting the non-existence of free will. So are there any arguments that may give me a better understanding of how free will could exist without being incoherent?

There is another option - that the universe cannot be understood in terms of determinism nor randomness; however since these are the only two categories by which we can comprehend it, this option is necessarily incoherent, or better said unintelligible. It is a mystery to me why so many philosophers insist on coherency or intelligibility of the universe - such incredible vanity.

If you really want to make sure you are not being close minded then take a look down this unfashionable path.

1
source | link

You write:

I haven't fully abandoned the idea of free will as it may be possible in either a way I can't perceive or there's possibly some other option in how the universe works other than causality or randomness. I want to make sure I'm not being close minded and instantly accepting the non-existence of free will. So are there any arguments that may give me a better understanding of how free will could exist without being incoherent?

There is another option - that the universe cannot be understood in terms of determinism nor randomness; however since these are the only two categories by which we can comprehend it, this option is necessarily incoherent, or better said unintelligible. It is a mystery to me why so many philosophers insist on coherency or intelligibility of the universe - such incredible vanity.

If you really want to make sure you are not being close minded then take a look down that unfashionable path.