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I don't mean if someone is dying of cancer and they refuse treatment or something -- I'm saying if a healthy person who is unhappy obsessing over his own inevitable death one day chooses to ignore this in order to relax and be happy, is this escapism? Is it a petty, cowardly act? Should one obsess over it, meditate on it and try and somehow find peace with it, or just live their life - and is doing the latter escapism? Is pushing it out of one's mind some kind of desperate coping mechanism, where meditating on it until you find peace with it is the only way to confront this issue bravely, or is the opposite true?

Addendum

I acknowledge my post has some interesting word usage, such as petty or cowardly, so I'll provide some context. This was made clear to me from the following words of one of the users:

My point was: why do you feel this that "finding peace" with your upcoming demise is a requirement? Who/what put that requirement on you? And why do you feel that postponing this process is "cowardly"? Who/what told you it is "cowardly" to not resolve your angsts right away? Note: you shall not give the answer to those two questions to me. You need to give those answers to yourself. And after that, the follow-up question becomes: do you really care about that this who/what thinks these things?

I am told to give these answers to myself, but I feel that this might provide some context, as I've said.

I feel that this "finding peace" is a requirement because it would enable me to not obsess and feel unhappy about my own inevitable demise one day.

I put that requirement on myself because I believe it is an 'antidote' of sorts to not worry about this sort of thing.

I don't feel, but worry that postponing this process is "cowardly" as I'm wondering if others agree or disagree that it escapes the reality of our demise by not thinking about it -- hiding from the thought of it and unable to bear the hard truth.

Basically, I'd like to allow myself to learn how to not dwell on it, but I don't want to be escapist -- unable to handle the truth of reality so I retreat into ignorance of the fact of my own demise. So I'd like to know if this is not dwelling on it thing is justified or not so as I can think of myself as not cowardly.

I don't mean if someone is dying of cancer and they refuse treatment or something -- I'm saying if a healthy person who is unhappy obsessing over his own inevitable death one day chooses to ignore this in order to relax and be happy, is this escapism? Is it a petty, cowardly act? Should one obsess over it, meditate on it and try and somehow find peace with it, or just live their life - and is doing the latter escapism? Is pushing it out of one's mind some kind of desperate coping mechanism, where meditating on it until you find peace with it is the only way to confront this issue bravely, or is the opposite true?

I don't mean if someone is dying of cancer and they refuse treatment or something -- I'm saying if a healthy person who is unhappy obsessing over his own inevitable death one day chooses to ignore this in order to relax and be happy, is this escapism? Is it a petty, cowardly act? Should one obsess over it, meditate on it and try and somehow find peace with it, or just live their life - and is doing the latter escapism? Is pushing it out of one's mind some kind of desperate coping mechanism, where meditating on it until you find peace with it is the only way to confront this issue bravely, or is the opposite true?

Addendum

I acknowledge my post has some interesting word usage, such as petty or cowardly, so I'll provide some context. This was made clear to me from the following words of one of the users:

My point was: why do you feel this that "finding peace" with your upcoming demise is a requirement? Who/what put that requirement on you? And why do you feel that postponing this process is "cowardly"? Who/what told you it is "cowardly" to not resolve your angsts right away? Note: you shall not give the answer to those two questions to me. You need to give those answers to yourself. And after that, the follow-up question becomes: do you really care about that this who/what thinks these things?

I am told to give these answers to myself, but I feel that this might provide some context, as I've said.

I feel that this "finding peace" is a requirement because it would enable me to not obsess and feel unhappy about my own inevitable demise one day.

I put that requirement on myself because I believe it is an 'antidote' of sorts to not worry about this sort of thing.

I don't feel, but worry that postponing this process is "cowardly" as I'm wondering if others agree or disagree that it escapes the reality of our demise by not thinking about it -- hiding from the thought of it and unable to bear the hard truth.

Basically, I'd like to allow myself to learn how to not dwell on it, but I don't want to be escapist -- unable to handle the truth of reality so I retreat into ignorance of the fact of my own demise. So I'd like to know if this is not dwelling on it thing is justified or not so as I can think of myself as not cowardly.

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Is willful ignorance about one's own mortality escapism?

I don't mean if someone is dying of cancer and they refuse treatment or something -- I'm saying if a healthy person who is unhappy obsessing over his own inevitable death one day chooses to ignore this in order to relax and be happy, is this escapism? Is it a petty, cowardly act? Should one obsess over it, meditate on it and try and somehow find peace with it, or just live their life - and is doing the latter escapism? Is pushing it out of one's mind some kind of desperate coping mechanism, where meditating on it until you find peace with it is the only way to confront this issue bravely, or is the opposite true?