6 Text added for clarification.
source | link

Endnote on history

Aristotle's contribution to philosophy was made two millenia and more ago. One might well expect errors in the work of a theorist who was clearing the ground and could know nothing of the Stoic, Scholastic, let alone post-Fregean developments in logic.

But that is not the problem here. Aristotle distinguishes between sullogismos and epagoge. The first is, without regard for historical nicety, translated as 'deduction', the second as 'induction'. My whole point is that Aristotelian epagoge is not induction in the sense which the question 'How did Aristotle define induction so incorrectly?' assumes. The question and accompanying text employ 'induction' in a post-Baconian sense. Compare the Aristotlian references above with Francis Bacon's Novum Organon (1620) and the fact is patent.

References

References

Endnote on history

Aristotle's contribution to philosophy was made two millenia and more ago. One might well expect errors in the work of a theorist who was clearing the ground and could know nothing of the Stoic, Scholastic, let alone post-Fregean developments in logic.

But that is not the problem here. Aristotle distinguishes between sullogismos and epagoge. The first is, without regard for historical nicety, translated as 'deduction', the second as 'induction'. My whole point is that Aristotelian epagoge is not induction in the sense which the question 'How did Aristotle define induction so incorrectly?' assumes. The question and accompanying text employ 'induction' in a post-Baconian sense. Compare the Aristotlian references above with Francis Bacon's Novum Organon (1620) and the fact is patent.

References

5 Text amended
source | link

Aristotle recognised syllogistic arguments that proceed from the general to the general. TakeThe First Figure allows the syllogistic mood generally'mood' (later) called 'Barbara' which allows:

Aristotle recognised syllogistic arguments that proceed from the general to the general. Take the syllogistic mood generally (later) called 'Barbara' which allows:

Aristotle recognised syllogistic arguments that proceed from the general to the general. The First Figure allows the 'mood' :

4 Text amended
source | link
  1. All A applies to all B

  2. All B applies to all C

  3. Therefore : All A applies to all C

  1. All applies to all B

  2. All B applies to all C

  3. Therefore : All A applies to all C

  1. All A applies to all B

  2. All B applies to all C

  3. Therefore : All A applies to all C

3 Text added for clarification.
source | link
2 Text added for clarification.
source | link
1
source | link