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Part of the question is about personal identity but I will focus here on physical recurrence.

I can think of an obvious counterexample to this idea: imagine space and time are infinite, except that nothing really happens outside of a finite region. Then there's no return. However what you say would be true under certain conditions, assuming that your first person experience supervenes on physical facts. This is related to Poincaré's recurrence theorem https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poincar%C3%A9_recurrence_theorem However this recurrence only occurs with the laws of classical physics for closed systems, which means that time must be infinite but not space.

Also related: Boltzman's brains: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boltzmann_brain

I can think of an obvious counterexample to this idea: imagine space and time are infinite, except that nothing really happens outside of a finite region. Then there's no return. However what you say would be true under certain conditions, assuming that your first person experience supervenes on physical facts. This is related to Poincaré's recurrence theorem https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poincar%C3%A9_recurrence_theorem However this recurrence only occurs with the laws of classical physics for closed systems, which means that time must be infinite but not space.

Also related: Boltzman's brains: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boltzmann_brain

Part of the question is about personal identity but I will focus here on physical recurrence.

I can think of an obvious counterexample to this idea: imagine space and time are infinite, except that nothing really happens outside of a finite region. Then there's no return. However what you say would be true under certain conditions, assuming that your first person experience supervenes on physical facts. This is related to Poincaré's recurrence theorem https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poincar%C3%A9_recurrence_theorem However this recurrence only occurs with the laws of classical physics for closed systems, which means that time must be infinite but not space.

Also related: Boltzman's brains: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boltzmann_brain

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I can think of an obvious counterexample to this idea: imagine space and time are infinite, except that nothing really happens outside of a finite region. Then there's no return. However what you say would be true under certain conditions, assuming that your first person experience supervenesupervenes on physical facts. This is related to Poincaré's recurrence theorem https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poincar%C3%A9_recurrence_theorem However this recurrence only occurs with the laws of classical physics for closed systems, which means that time must be infinite but not space.

Also related: Boltzman's brains: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boltzmann_brain

I can think of an obvious counterexample to this idea: imagine space and time are infinite, except that nothing really happens outside of a finite region. Then there's no return. However what you say would be true under certain conditions, assuming that your first person experience supervene on physical facts. This is related to Poincaré's recurrence theorem https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poincar%C3%A9_recurrence_theorem However this recurrence only occurs with the laws of classical physics for closed systems, which means that time must be infinite but not space.

Also related: Boltzman's brains: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boltzmann_brain

I can think of an obvious counterexample to this idea: imagine space and time are infinite, except that nothing really happens outside of a finite region. Then there's no return. However what you say would be true under certain conditions, assuming that your first person experience supervenes on physical facts. This is related to Poincaré's recurrence theorem https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poincar%C3%A9_recurrence_theorem However this recurrence only occurs with the laws of classical physics for closed systems, which means that time must be infinite but not space.

Also related: Boltzman's brains: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boltzmann_brain

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I can think of an obvious counterexample to this idea: imagine space and time are infinite, except that nothing really happens outside of a finite region. Then there's no return. However what you say would be true under certain conditions, assuming that your first person experience supervene on physical facts. This is related to Poincaré's recurrence theorem https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poincar%C3%A9_recurrence_theorem However this recurrence only occurs with the laws of classical physics for closed systems, which means that time must be infinite but not space.

Also related: Boltzman's brains: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boltzmann_brain