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You can represent inductive arguments using the various notations used to symbolize first-order logic. However, there is no other sense in which you can “make” them in first-order logic.

Some examples of inductive arguments represented in a common notation for first-order logic, in which they are all invalid, include:

  1. Pa, Pb, Pc, Pd, Pe |= Pf
  2. ∃xPx |= ∀xPx
  3. A→B, A→C, A→D, A→E |= A→F

There are infinitely many examples.

Here is an argument that looks inductive, but is not, because it is deductively valid in first-order logic:

  1. (Doman = {a, b, c}) Pa, Pb, Pc |= ∀xPx

You can represent inductive arguments using the various notations used to symbolize first-order logic. However, there is no other sense in which you can “make” them in first-order logic.

Some examples of inductive arguments represented in a common notation for first-order logic, in which they are all invalid, include:

  1. Pa, Pb, Pc, Pd, Pe |= Pf
  2. ∃xPx |= ∀xPx
  3. A→B, A→C, A→D, A→E |= A→F

There are infinitely many examples.

Here is an argument that looks inductive, but is not, because it is deductively valid in first-order logic:

  1. (Doman = {a, b, c}) Pa, Pb, Pc |= ∀xPx

You can represent inductive arguments using the various notations used to symbolize first-order logic. However, there is no other sense in which you can “make” them in first-order logic.

Some examples of inductive arguments represented in a common notation for first-order logic, in which they are all invalid, include:

  1. Pa, Pb, Pc, Pd, Pe |= Pf
  2. ∃xPx |= ∀xPx
  3. A→B, A→C, A→D, A→E |= A→F

There are infinitely many examples.

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source | link

You can represent inductive arguments using the various notations used to symbolize first-order logic. However, there is no other sense in which you can “make” them in first-order logic.

Some examples of inductive arguments represented in a common notation for first-order logic, in which they are all invalid, include:

  1. Pa, Pb, Pc, Pd, Pe |= Pf
  2. ∃xPx |= ∀xPx
  3. A→B, A→C, A→D, A→E |= A→F

There are infinitely many examples.

Here is an argument that looks inductive, but is not, because it is deductively valid in first-order logic:

  1. (Doman = {a, b, c}) Pa, Pb, Pc |= ∀xPx