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No, but not quite for the reason of the accepted answer. An ad hominem argument is of the structure:

"A is so because Person X is a "bad" person." (where A is the proposition you are trying to argue for, Person X is who you are arguing against, and "bad" is whatever character flaw you want).

Whereas that is not the structure of what your argument opponent used. Your opponent used actual arguments (presumably), but in the end, simply gave up on arguing with you. She then cited her reason why she gave up, which is that you are unable to understand her arguments. That is not the same thing as a support for her position,position; it's just an explanation for why she is giving up.

No, but not quite for the reason of the accepted answer. An ad hominem argument is of the structure:

"A is so because Person X is a "bad" person." (where A is the proposition you are trying to argue for, Person X is who you are arguing against, and "bad" is whatever character flaw you want).

Whereas that is not the structure of what your argument opponent used. Your opponent used actual arguments (presumably), but in the end, simply gave up on arguing with you. She then cited her reason why she gave up, which is that you are unable to understand her arguments. That is not the same thing as a support for her position, it's just an explanation for why she is giving up.

No, but not quite for the reason of the accepted answer. An ad hominem argument is of the structure:

"A is so because Person X is a "bad" person." (where A is the proposition you are trying to argue for, Person X is who you are arguing against, and "bad" is whatever character flaw you want).

Whereas that is not the structure of what your argument opponent used. Your opponent used actual arguments (presumably), but in the end, simply gave up on arguing with you. She then cited her reason why she gave up, which is that you are unable to understand her arguments. That is not the same thing as a support for her position; it's just an explanation for why she is giving up.

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No, but not quite for the reason of the accepted answer. An ad hominem argument is of the structure:

"A is so because Person X is a "bad" person." (where A is the proposition you are trying to argue for, Person X is who you are arguing against, and "bad" is whatever character flaw you want).

Whereas that is not the structure of what your argument opponent used. Your opponent used actual arguments (presumably), but in the end, simply gave up on arguing with you. She then cited her reason why she gave up, which is that you are unable to understand her arguments. That is not the same thing as a support for her position, it's just an explanation for why she is giving up.