2 Copy edit... still can't make out sentence beginning with "It is often neglected..."
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I was just reading about gnostic syzygy https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeon_(Gnosticism) This is a kind of cosmic cosmogeny, a how things came to be as they are. That is absolutely a part of philosophy, though more associated with theology. In Hinduism for instance there is https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Yantra which is theological/spiritual, and I think philosophical. Buddhist cosmology is pieced together from various scriptural and commentary mentions, and varies a lot between traditions, but fundamentally aims at a theory of psychological cause and effect that can guide us in living ethically and spiritually well https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhist_cosmology

Plato in the symposium describes various mythological ideas, though they seem more like thought-experiments, like his cave analogy. Plato is usually considered a monotheist, but given Socrates was executed for qurstioningquestioning polytheistic verities you can see why he wasn't totally explicit.

It is often neglected about Greek myths and pantheon, that they can be viewed as quite a sophisticated psycologicalpsychological model, as expounded by Jung & in depth psychology, and extended in understanding by translation of linear B.

There is some line between 'just so' stories, that are primarily entertainments & sources of comfort, and philosophy which eschews those aims. But it is a line with overlap, even now - like Nietzsche's three metamorphesees, ot his thought-experiment of eternal return.

David Deutsch in ThrThe Fabric Of Reality points out the need for more than physics in a 'unified big picture'. We must be able to locate ourselves in our cosmology, as well as how the cosmos came to be this way. Whatever we come ipup with, when it is inevitably supplanted, we will look back on as infused with our psychology - like we look at the four humours or astrology. The line will move. So I think we should be humble, and accept some myth-making in philosophy, and look for it's supply of metaphiricalmetaphorical not purely literal truths, and especially how 'imagine if' suspensions of disbelief can yield insights like gedankenexperiments can.

I was just reading about gnostic syzygy https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeon_(Gnosticism) This is a kind of cosmic cosmogeny, a how things came to be as they are. That is absolutely a part of philosophy, though more associated with theology. In Hinduism for instance there is https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Yantra which is theological/spiritual, and I think philosophical. Buddhist cosmology is pieced together from various scriptural and commentary mentions, and varies a lot between traditions, but fundamentally aims at a theory of psychological cause and effect that can guide us in living ethically and spiritually well https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhist_cosmology

Plato in the symposium describes various mythological ideas, though they seem more like thought-experiments, like his cave analogy. Plato is usually considered a monotheist, but given Socrates was executed for qurstioning polytheistic verities you can see why he wasn't totally explicit.

It is often neglected about Greek myths and pantheon, that they can be viewed as quite a sophisticated psycological model, as expounded by Jung & in depth psychology, and extended in understanding by translation of linear B.

There is some line between 'just so' stories, that are primarily entertainments & sources of comfort, and philosophy which eschews those aims. But it is a line with overlap, even now - like Nietzsche's three metamorphesees, ot his thought-experiment of eternal return.

David Deutsch in Thr Fabric Of Reality points out the need for more than physics in a 'unified big picture'. We must be able to locate ourselves in our cosmology, as well as how the cosmos came to be this way. Whatever we come ip with, when it is inevitably supplanted, we will look back on as infused with our psychology - like we look at the four humours or astrology. The line will move. So I think we should be humble, and accept some myth-making in philosophy, and look for it's supply of metaphirical not purely literal truths, and especially how 'imagine if' suspensions of disbelief can yield insights like gedankenexperiments can.

I was just reading about gnostic syzygy https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeon_(Gnosticism) This is a kind of cosmic cosmogeny, a how things came to be as they are. That is absolutely a part of philosophy, though more associated with theology. In Hinduism for instance there is https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Yantra which is theological/spiritual, and I think philosophical. Buddhist cosmology is pieced together from various scriptural and commentary mentions, and varies a lot between traditions, but fundamentally aims at a theory of psychological cause and effect that can guide us in living ethically and spiritually well https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhist_cosmology

Plato in the symposium describes various mythological ideas, though they seem more like thought-experiments, like his cave analogy. Plato is usually considered a monotheist, but given Socrates was executed for questioning polytheistic verities you can see why he wasn't totally explicit.

It is often neglected about Greek myths and pantheon, that they can be viewed as quite a sophisticated psychological model, as expounded by Jung & in depth psychology, and extended in understanding by translation of linear B.

There is some line between 'just so' stories, that are primarily entertainments & sources of comfort, and philosophy which eschews those aims. But it is a line with overlap, even now - like Nietzsche's three metamorphesees, ot his thought-experiment of eternal return.

David Deutsch in The Fabric Of Reality points out the need for more than physics in a 'unified big picture'. We must be able to locate ourselves in our cosmology, as well as how the cosmos came to be this way. Whatever we come up with, when it is inevitably supplanted, we will look back on as infused with our psychology - like we look at the four humours or astrology. The line will move. So I think we should be humble, and accept some myth-making in philosophy, and look for it's supply of metaphorical not purely literal truths, and especially how 'imagine if' suspensions of disbelief can yield insights like gedankenexperiments can.

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I was just reading about gnostic syzygy https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeon_(Gnosticism) This is a kind of cosmic cosmogeny, a how things came to be as they are. That is absolutely a part of philosophy, though more associated with theology. In Hinduism for instance there is https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Yantra which is theological/spiritual, and I think philosophical. Buddhist cosmology is pieced together from various scriptural and commentary mentions, and varies a lot between traditions, but fundamentally aims at a theory of psychological cause and effect that can guide us in living ethically and spiritually well https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhist_cosmology

Plato in the symposium describes various mythological ideas, though they seem more like thought-experiments, like his cave analogy. Plato is usually considered a monotheist, but given Socrates was executed for qurstioning polytheistic verities you can see why he wasn't totally explicit.

It is often neglected about Greek myths and pantheon, that they can be viewed as quite a sophisticated psycological model, as expounded by Jung & in depth psychology, and extended in understanding by translation of linear B.

There is some line between 'just so' stories, that are primarily entertainments & sources of comfort, and philosophy which eschews those aims. But it is a line with overlap, even now - like Nietzsche's three metamorphesees, ot his thought-experiment of eternal return.

David Deutsch in Thr Fabric Of Reality points out the need for more than physics in a 'unified big picture'. We must be able to locate ourselves in our cosmology, as well as how the cosmos came to be this way. Whatever we come ip with, when it is inevitably supplanted, we will look back on as infused with our psychology - like we look at the four humours or astrology. The line will move. So I think we should be humble, and accept some myth-making in philosophy, and look for it's supply of metaphirical not purely literal truths, and especially how 'imagine if' suspensions of disbelief can yield insights like gedankenexperiments can.