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I regret a decision or an action if a different decision or action would have led (by my own standards) to a better outcome - where this outcome is known to me or believed by me. 'Better' here includes both positively better (as in gaining things I want, fulfilling my preferences) and 'less bad' (as in less harmful to myself or others).

  1. If I lose my memory at time t2, I cannot 'directly' regret what I did at time t1, since I can't remember it, and so I cannot at t2 learn from my previous mistakes. That's generally right but the claim needs to be hedged by the fact that if I experienced regret at t1 this could have taught me a lesson which, absorbed into my consciousness at t1, remains a part of my stance to life at t2 even though the experience is not remembered.

  2. If I lose my memory at time t2, I can still be reliably informed what I did at t1 and earlier. If I accept this information as reliable, I can regret what I believe (correctly) I did at t1 and earlier and hence experience regret and learn from my previous mistakes even though, ex hypothesi, I do not remember them.

  3. If all this fails, then as long as I can remember decisions or actions from t2 onwards, I can (from t2 onwards) make mistakes, regret them, and learn from them.

  4. There are other ways of learning the lessons of life or gaining the benefits of experience than by regretting one's mistakes. One can learn from the knowledge and wisdom of others. A parallel : if I am acquiring a skill I can regret my mistakes and learn from them but I can also learn from observing a skilful practitioner at work.

I regret a decision or an action if a different decision or action would have led (by my own standards) to a better outcome - where this outcome is known to me or believed by me. 'Better' here includes both positively better (as in gaining things I want, fulfilling my preferences) and 'less bad' (as in less harmful to myself or others).

  1. If I lose my memory at time t2, I cannot 'directly' regret what I did at time t1, since I can't remember it, and so I cannot at t2 learn from my previous mistakes. That's generally right but the claim needs to be hedged by the fact that if I experienced regret at t1 this could have taught me a lesson which, absorbed into my consciousness at t1, remains a part of my stance to life at t2 even though the experience is not remembered.

  2. If I lose my memory at time t2, I can still be reliably informed what I did at t1 and earlier. If I accept this information as reliable, I can regret what I believe (correctly) I did at t1 and earlier and hence experience regret and learn from my previous mistakes even though, ex hypothesi, I do not remember them.

  3. If all this fails, then as long as I can remember decisions or actions from t2 onwards, I can (from t2 onwards) make mistakes, regret them, and learn from them.

I regret a decision or an action if a different decision or action would have led (by my own standards) to a better outcome - where this outcome is known to me or believed by me. 'Better' here includes both positively better (as in gaining things I want, fulfilling my preferences) and 'less bad' (as in less harmful to myself or others).

  1. If I lose my memory at time t2, I cannot 'directly' regret what I did at time t1, since I can't remember it, and so I cannot at t2 learn from my previous mistakes. That's generally right but the claim needs to be hedged by the fact that if I experienced regret at t1 this could have taught me a lesson which, absorbed into my consciousness at t1, remains a part of my stance to life at t2 even though the experience is not remembered.

  2. If I lose my memory at time t2, I can still be reliably informed what I did at t1 and earlier. If I accept this information as reliable, I can regret what I believe (correctly) I did at t1 and earlier and hence experience regret and learn from my previous mistakes even though, ex hypothesi, I do not remember them.

  3. If all this fails, then as long as I can remember decisions or actions from t2 onwards, I can (from t2 onwards) make mistakes, regret them, and learn from them.

  4. There are other ways of learning the lessons of life or gaining the benefits of experience than by regretting one's mistakes. One can learn from the knowledge and wisdom of others. A parallel : if I am acquiring a skill I can regret my mistakes and learn from them but I can also learn from observing a skilful practitioner at work.

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I regret a decision or an action if a different decision or action would have led (by my own standards) to a better outcome - where this outcome is known to me or believed by me. 'Better' here includes both positively better (as in gaining things I want, fulfilling my preferences) and 'less bad' (as in less harmful to myself or others).

  1. If I lose my memory at time t2, I cannot 'directly' regret what I did at time t1, since I can't remember it, and so I cannot at t2 learn from my previous mistakes. That's generally right but the claim needs to be hedged by the fact that if I experienced regret at t1 this could have taught me a lesson which, absorbed into my consciousness at t1, remains a part of my stance to life at t2 even though the experience is not remembered.

  2. If I lose my memory at time t2, I can still be reliably informed what I did at t1 and earlier. If I accept this information as reliable, I can regret what I believe (correctly) I did at t1 and earlier and hence experience regret and learn from my previous mistakes even though, ex hypothesi, I do not remember them.

  3. If all this fails, then as long as I can remember decisions or actions from t2 onwards, I can (from t2 onwards) make mistakes, regret them, and learn from them.